Ericameria discoidea var. winwardii - Dorn and Delmat.
Winward's Whitestem Goldenbush
Other English Common Names: Winward's Goldenbush
Synonym(s): Ericameria winwardii (Dorn & Delmatier) R.P. Roberts & Urbatsch
Taxonomic Status: Provisionally accepted
Related ITIS Name(s): Ericameria winwardii (Dorn & Delmatier) R.P. Roberts & Urbatsch (TSN 780301)
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.777388
Element Code: PDAST3L0N3
Informal Taxonomy: Plants, Vascular - Flowering Plants - Aster Family
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Plantae Anthophyta Dicotyledoneae Asterales Asteraceae Ericameria
Check this box to expand all report sections:
Concept Reference
Help
Concept Reference: Dorn, R. D., and C. H. Delmatier. 2005. A new variety of Ericameria discoidea (Asteraceae) from Idaho and Wyoming. Madrono 52(1):63-65.
Concept Reference Code: A05UNK01HQUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Ericameria discoidea var. winwardii
Taxonomic Comments: First described as a variety of Ericameria discoidea (Dorn and Delmatier 2005). However, Roberts et al. (2005) believe that this taxon deserves specific rank [Ericameria winwardii] "due to its unique morphology, restricted, allopatric distribution, and adaptation to different edaphic conditions."
Conservation Status
Help

NatureServe Status

Global Status: G4G5T1
Global Status Last Reviewed: 09Apr2009
Global Status Last Changed: 09Apr2009
Rounded Global Status: T1 - Critically Imperiled
Reasons: Described in 2005, this variety of Ericameria discoidea var. winwardii (= E. winwardii) is known from Bear Lake County, southeastern Idaho and southern Lincoln County, southwestern Wyoming. Two occurrences with a total of approximately 4600 documented individuals are known from Idaho, and one occurrence with an unknown number of individuals is known from Wyoming. Threats include OHV use and trampling by cattle, which cause erosion of the unstable substrates on which this plant occurs. Surveys of apparently suitable habitat in the area between the known Idaho and Wyoming sites (approximately 80 km distant) may reveal additional occurrences.
Nation: United States
National Status: N1

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
United States Idaho (S1), Wyoming (S1)

Other Statuses

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent Comments: Known only from the Preuss Range, Bear Lake County, southeastern Idaho and the South Fork Twin Creek drainage, southern Lincoln County, southwestern Wyoming (Dorn and Delmatier 2005). The Idaho and Wyoming areas are separated by approximately 80 km; the area between them has not yet been thoroughly searched, and may contain additional occurrences (Kinter 2009).

Number of Occurrences: 1 - 5
Number of Occurrences Comments: There are three total EOs known; 1 in Wyoming and 2 in Idaho. Surveys in the vicinity of known Idaho sites in 2009 added additional area to the two known occurrences, but did not discover additional occurrences. However, it is believed that further survey may yet locate additional sites, for example on apparently suitable outcrops of the Twin Creek Limestone formation between the currently-known Wyoming and Idaho sites (Kinter 2009).

Population Size Comments: In Idaho, approximately 4580 individuals have been documented (2320 at one occurrence and 2260 at the other) (Kinter 2009). Population size in Wyoming unknown.

Overall Threat Impact Comments: The unstable substrates on which this plant occurs are susceptible to erosion following disturbance. In Idaho, the most widespread disturbances within known sites are OHV use and trampling by cattle; E. discoidea var. winwardii plants tend to be absent from OHV trail beds (Kinter 2009). In Idaho, native plant communities are largely intact at occupied sites, but non-native plants are present at low levels; these plants should be monitored to ensure they do not become problematic (Kinter 2009).

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
Help
Global Range: Known only from the Preuss Range, Bear Lake County, southeastern Idaho and the South Fork Twin Creek drainage, southern Lincoln County, southwestern Wyoming (Dorn and Delmatier 2005). The Idaho and Wyoming areas are separated by approximately 80 km; the area between them has not yet been thoroughly searched, and may contain additional occurrences (Kinter 2009).

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
Color legend for Distribution Map

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States ID, WY

Range Map
No map available.


U.S. Distribution by County Help
State County Name (FIPS Code)
ID Bear Lake (16007)
WY Lincoln (56023)
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
U.S. Distribution by Watershed Help
Watershed Region Help Watershed Name (Watershed Code)
16 Upper Bear (16010101)+, Bear Lake (16010201)+
+ Natural heritage record(s) exist for this watershed
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
Ecology & Life History
Help
Basic Description: A golden-flowered small perennial shrub, flowering late summer to fall.
Technical Description: From Flora of North America (2006): "Plants 5-20 cm. Stems stems prostrate or ascending to erect, green when young (▒ concealed by tomentum), becoming tan to brown, moderately branched, densely floccose-tomentose, eglandular. Leaves ascending; blades elliptic or oblanceolate (flat), 6-15 x 2.5-5 mm, midnerves prominent, apices acute (often curved downward), faces densely silvery white floccose-tomentose, eglandular; fascicles absent. Heads usually borne singly, sometimes (2-3) in racemiform arrays (5-20 mm wide). Peduncles 1-5 mm (tomentose, bracts 0-3, phyllary-like). Involucres obconic, 9-12 x 3-4 mm. Phyllaries 11-15 in 2-3 series, lanceolate or elliptic to oblanceolate, 1.5-5 x 0.8-1.3 mm, subequal, outer herbaceous or herbaceous-tipped, inner mostly chartaceous or herbaceous-tipped, midnerves conspicuous, raised, (margins: outer herbaceous, entire, floccose-tomentose, inner narrowly scarious, minutely lacerate) apices acute to acuminate, outer abaxial faces floccose-tomentose, inner glabrate. Ray florets 0. Disc florets 4-9; corollas ca. 9 mm. Cypselae tan to brown, narrowly oblanceoloid, 5-7 mm (5-ribbed), densely sericeous; pappi tan, 8-9 mm."
Diagnostic Characteristics: Distinguished from E. [discoidea var.] linearis and E. [discoidea var.] discoidea by its smaller stature, floccose-tomentose pubescence throughout (such that the tomentum of the stems contrasts less sharply with the foliage), absence of glandular hairs, and 10 or fewer flowers per capitulum (Dorn and Delmatier 2005, Roberts et al. 2005). Its stems lack the white, felt-like tomentum characteristic of E. [discoidea var.] discoidea (Roberts et al. 2005). Its leaves tend to be intermediate between the broad, usually with wavy or crisped margins, leaves of E. [discoidea var.] discoidea and the narrow leaves of E. [discoidea var.] linearis (Dorn and Delmatier 2005). In addition, E. [discoidea var.] linearis and E. [discoidea var.] discoidea tend to grow at higher elevations (2285-3960 m with a few collections from as low as 1830 m) on coarse, well-drained soils along streams and lakes as well as stony slopes and alpine fell-fields; in contrast, E. [discoidea var.] winwardii occurs at 1900-2200 m in less sloping areas, in the dryer foothills and out into the basins but where the finer clay soils hold moisture and/or where extra runoff provides additional moisture (Dorn and Delmatier 2005, Roberts et al. 2005).
Terrestrial Habitat(s): Bare rock/talus/scree, Grassland/herbaceous, Shrubland/chaparral
Habitat Comments: Known from barren whitish outcrops of Twin Creek Limestone, mostly on erosive, clay-shale slopes, ridges, or gullies, occasionally on gently rolling terrain. Known from 0-40░ slopes, all aspects. Typically dominates the sparse vegetation in which it occurs. Associated species include Amelanchier alnifolia, Chrysothamnus viscidiflorus, Purshia tridentata, Mahonia repens, Achnatherum hymenoides, Pseudoroegneria spicata, Stenotus acaulis, Comandra umbellata, Ivesia gordonii, Astragalus jejunus var. jejunus, and Eriogonum brevicaule var. laxifolium, as well as low levels of the non-natives Tragopogon dubious, Lactuca serriola, Bromus inermis, and Isatis tinctoria. Landscape in the vicinity of known occurrences is predominantly mountain shrub grassland dominated by Artemisia tridentata, A. arbuscula, and Pseudoroegneria spicata. 1900-2200 m.
Economic Attributes Not yet assessed
Help
Management Summary Not yet assessed
Help
Population/Occurrence Delineation Not yet assessed
Help
Population/Occurrence Viability
Help
U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
Help
Authors/Contributors
Help
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Edition Date: 06Apr2009
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Author: Oliver, L., rev. K. Gravuer (2010)

Botanical data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs), The North Carolina Botanical Garden, and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References
Help
  • Andersen, M.D. 2011. HUC10-based species range maps. Prepared by Wyoming Natural Diversity Database for use in the pilot WISDOM application operational from inception to yet-to-be-determined date of update of tool.

  • Dorn, R. D. and C. H. Delmatier. 2005. A new variety of Ericameria discoidea (Asteraceae) from Idaho and Wyoming. Madro˝o 52:63-65.

  • Dorn, R. D., and C. H. Delmatier. 2005. A new variety of Ericameria discoidea (Asteraceae) from Idaho and Wyoming. Madrono 52(1):63-65.

  • Fertig, W. 2012. Status of Winward's goldenweed (Ericameria discoidea var. winwardii) in Wyoming. Unpublished report prepared for the Bureau of Land Management Wyoming State Office and Wyoming Natural Diversity Database by Moenave Botanical Consulting, Kanab, UT.

  • Flora of North America Editorial Committee. 2006b. Flora of North America North of Mexico. Vol. 20. Magnoliophyta: Asteridae, part 7: Asteraceae, part 2. Oxford Univ. Press, New York. xxii + 666 pp.

  • Kinter, C.L. 2009. Survey for Winward's goldenbush (Ericameria discoidea var. winwardii, Ericameria winwardii) on the Caribou-Targhee National Forest, Bear Lake County, Idaho. Idaho Natural Heritage Program, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, Idaho. 31 pp. plus appendices.

  • Roberts, R. P. 2002. Phylogeny of Ericameria, Chrysothamnus and related genera (Asteraceae: Astereae) based on nuclear ribosomal DNA sequence data. PhD Dissertation, Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA.

  • Roberts, R. P. and L. E. Urbatsch. 2005. New species and new combinations in Ericameria (Asteraceae: Astereae). Sida 21:1557-1564.

  • Roberts, R.P., L.E. Urbatsch, and J. Anderson. 2005. New species and new combinations in Ericameria (Asteraceae: Astereae). SIDA 21(3): 1557-1564.

  • Urbatsch, L. W., L. C. Anderson, R. P. Roberts, and K. M. Neubig. 2006. Ericameria. Pages 50-77 in Flora of North America Editorical Committee, editor. Flora of North America North of Mexico. Vol. 20. Magnoliophyta: Asteridae (in part): Asteraceae part 2. Oxford University Press, New York, NY.

Use Guidelines & Citation

Use Guidelines and Citation

The Small Print: Trademark, Copyright, Citation Guidelines, Restrictions on Use, and Information Disclaimer.

Note: All species and ecological community data presented in NatureServe Explorer at http://explorer.natureserve.org were updated to be current with NatureServe's central databases as of March 2019.
Note: This report was printed on

Trademark Notice: "NatureServe", NatureServe Explorer, The NatureServe logo, and all other names of NatureServe programs referenced herein are trademarks of NatureServe. Any other product or company names mentioned herein are the trademarks of their respective owners.

Copyright Notice: Copyright © 2019 NatureServe, 2511 Richmond (Jefferson Davis) Highway, Suite 930, Arlington, VA 22202, U.S.A. All Rights Reserved. Each document delivered from this server or web site may contain other proprietary notices and copyright information relating to that document. The following citation should be used in any published materials which reference the web site.

Citation for data on website including State Distribution, Watershed, and Reptile Range maps:
NatureServe. 2019. NatureServe Explorer: An online encyclopedia of life [web application]. Version 7.1. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia. Available http://explorer.natureserve.org. (Accessed:

Citation for Bird Range Maps of North America:
Ridgely, R.S., T.F. Allnutt, T. Brooks, D.K. McNicol, D.W. Mehlman, B.E. Young, and J.R. Zook. 2003. Digital Distribution Maps of the Birds of the Western Hemisphere, version 1.0. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Acknowledgement Statement for Bird Range Maps of North America:
"Data provided by NatureServe in collaboration with Robert Ridgely, James Zook, The Nature Conservancy - Migratory Bird Program, Conservation International - CABS, World Wildlife Fund - US, and Environment Canada - WILDSPACE."

Citation for Mammal Range Maps of North America:
Patterson, B.D., G. Ceballos, W. Sechrest, M.F. Tognelli, T. Brooks, L. Luna, P. Ortega, I. Salazar, and B.E. Young. 2003. Digital Distribution Maps of the Mammals of the Western Hemisphere, version 1.0. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Acknowledgement Statement for Mammal Range Maps of North America:
"Data provided by NatureServe in collaboration with Bruce Patterson, Wes Sechrest, Marcelo Tognelli, Gerardo Ceballos, The Nature Conservancy-Migratory Bird Program, Conservation International-CABS, World Wildlife Fund-US, and Environment Canada-WILDSPACE."

Citation for Amphibian Range Maps of the Western Hemisphere:
IUCN, Conservation International, and NatureServe. 2004. Global Amphibian Assessment. IUCN, Conservation International, and NatureServe, Washington, DC and Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Acknowledgement Statement for Amphibian Range Maps of the Western Hemisphere:
"Data developed as part of the Global Amphibian Assessment and provided by IUCN-World Conservation Union, Conservation International and NatureServe."

NOTE: Full metadata for the Bird Range Maps of North America is available at:
http://www.natureserve.org/library/birdDistributionmapsmetadatav1.pdf.

Full metadata for the Mammal Range Maps of North America is available at:
http://www.natureserve.org/library/mammalsDistributionmetadatav1.pdf.

Restrictions on Use: Permission to use, copy and distribute documents delivered from this server is hereby granted under the following conditions:
  1. The above copyright notice must appear in all copies;
  2. Any use of the documents available from this server must be for informational purposes only and in no instance for commercial purposes;
  3. Some data may be downloaded to files and altered in format for analytical purposes, however the data should still be referenced using the citation above;
  4. No graphics available from this server can be used, copied or distributed separate from the accompanying text. Any rights not expressly granted herein are reserved by NatureServe. Nothing contained herein shall be construed as conferring by implication, estoppel, or otherwise any license or right under any trademark of NatureServe. No trademark owned by NatureServe may be used in advertising or promotion pertaining to the distribution of documents delivered from this server without specific advance permission from NatureServe. Except as expressly provided above, nothing contained herein shall be construed as conferring any license or right under any NatureServe copyright.
Information Warranty Disclaimer: All documents and related graphics provided by this server and any other documents which are referenced by or linked to this server are provided "as is" without warranty as to the currentness, completeness, or accuracy of any specific data. NatureServe hereby disclaims all warranties and conditions with regard to any documents provided by this server or any other documents which are referenced by or linked to this server, including but not limited to all implied warranties and conditions of merchantibility, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement. NatureServe makes no representations about the suitability of the information delivered from this server or any other documents that are referenced to or linked to this server. In no event shall NatureServe be liable for any special, indirect, incidental, consequential damages, or for damages of any kind arising out of or in connection with the use or performance of information contained in any documents provided by this server or in any other documents which are referenced by or linked to this server, under any theory of liability used. NatureServe may update or make changes to the documents provided by this server at any time without notice; however, NatureServe makes no commitment to update the information contained herein. Since the data in the central databases are continually being updated, it is advisable to refresh data retrieved at least once a year after its receipt. The data provided is for planning, assessment, and informational purposes. Site specific projects or activities should be reviewed for potential environmental impacts with appropriate regulatory agencies. If ground-disturbing activities are proposed on a site, the appropriate state natural heritage program(s) or conservation data center can be contacted for a site-specific review of the project area (see Visit Local Programs).

Feedback Request: NatureServe encourages users to let us know of any errors or significant omissions that you find in the data through (see Contact Us). Your comments will be very valuable in improving the overall quality of our databases for the benefit of all users.