Pisidium casertanum - (Poli, 1791)
Ubiquitous Peaclam
Taxonomic Status: Accepted
Related ITIS Name(s): Pisidium casertanum (Poli, 1791) (TSN 81405)
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.119089
Element Code: IMBIV51030
Informal Taxonomy: Animals, Invertebrates - Mollusks - Other Mollusks
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Animalia Mollusca Bivalvia Veneroida Sphaeriidae Pisidium
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Concept Reference
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Concept Reference: Turgeon, D.D., J.F. Quinn, Jr., A.E. Bogan, E.V. Coan, F.G. Hochberg, W.G. Lyons, P.M. Mikkelsen, R.J. Neves, C.F.E. Roper, G. Rosenberg, B. Roth, A. Scheltema, F.G. Thompson, M. Vecchione, and J.D. Williams. 1998. Common and scientific names of aquatic invertebrates from the United States and Canada: Mollusks. 2nd Edition. American Fisheries Society Special Publication 26, Bethesda, Maryland: 526 pp.
Concept Reference Code: B98TUR01EHUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Pisidium casertanum
Taxonomic Comments: Pisidium roperi recognized as distinct by Henderson (1924), but current treatments include with Pisidium casertanum (Turgeon et al. 1998, Mackie 2007, Bogan 2013).
Conservation Status
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NatureServe Status

Global Status: G5
Global Status Last Reviewed: 28Jan2015
Global Status Last Changed: 16Mar2004
Ranking Methodology Used: Ranked by calculator
Rounded Global Status: G5 - Secure
Reasons: This is a widespread species, with many occurrences and no significant threats at a global level.
Nation: United States
National Status: N5 (07Jun2004)
Nation: Canada
National Status: N5 (24Oct2016)

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
United States Alaska (SNR), Arizona (SNR), Colorado (SNR), Idaho (S5), Indiana (SNR), Kentucky (SU), Massachusetts (SNR), Michigan (SNR), Montana (SNR), New York (SNR), North Carolina (S5), Tennessee (SNR), Texas (SNR), Utah (S4?), Virginia (S4), Wyoming (SNR)
Canada Alberta (S5), British Columbia (S5), Labrador (SU), Manitoba (S5), New Brunswick (S5), Newfoundland Island (S4), Northwest Territories (S5), Nova Scotia (S5), Nunavut (S5), Ontario (S5), Prince Edward Island (SU), Quebec (SNR), Saskatchewan (S5), Yukon Territory (S5)

Other Statuses

IUCN Red List Category: LC - Least concern

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent: >2,500,000 square km (greater than 1,000,000 square miles)
Range Extent Comments: Pisidium casertanum is one of the most widely distributed species of freshwater mollusc in the world. It is widely known from Palaearctic and Nearctic regions and some parts of South America, Africa and Australia and Asia. In North America, it has been recorded from every state and province except North Dakota and Kentucky; these are probably oversights (Mackie 2007).

Number of Occurrences: > 300
Number of Occurrences Comments: This species is also known from Pleistocene deposits in the Black Hills of Fall River/Custer Cos., South Dakota (Jass et al., 2002). Lysne and Clark (2009) found it in the Bruneau River (survey area from Snake River confluence upstream to Hot Creek- 41 km) in Idaho. It has been documented in Alaska in the north Gulf Coast and southwestern portions (Baxter, 1987).

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
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Global Range: (>2,500,000 square km (greater than 1,000,000 square miles)) Pisidium casertanum is one of the most widely distributed species of freshwater mollusc in the world. It is widely known from Palaearctic and Nearctic regions and some parts of South America, Africa and Australia and Asia. In North America, it has been recorded from every state and province except North Dakota and Kentucky; these are probably oversights (Mackie 2007).

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.

Map unavailable!:
Distribution data for U.S. states and Canadian provinces is known to be incomplete or has not been reviewed for this taxon.
Endemism: occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States AK, AZ, CO, ID, IN, KY, MA, MI, MT, NC, NY, TN, TX, UT, VA, WY
Canada AB, BC, LB, MB, NB, NF, NS, NT, NU, ON, PE, QC, SK, YT

Range Map
No map available.

Ecology & Life History
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Habitat Type: Freshwater
Non-Migrant: N
Locally Migrant: N
Long Distance Migrant: N
Habitat Comments: This species has adapted to a variety of habitats, including ponds, streams with fast or slow currents, rivers, shallow and deep lakes (both oligotrophic and eutrophic), as well as roadside ditches, and temporary ponds and swamps (Mackie 2007, Herrington 1962). In lakes, it lives in water down to 40 m deep (Mackie 2007).
Economic Attributes Not yet assessed
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Management Summary Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Delineation Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Viability
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U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
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Authors/Contributors
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NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Edition Date: 28Jan2015
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Author: Mackie, G.L.

Zoological data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs) and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References
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  • Baxter, R. 1987. Mollusks of Alaska: a listing of all mollusks, freshwater, terrestrial, and marine reported from the State of Alaska, with locations of the species types, maximum sizes and marine depths inhabited. Shells and Sea Life, Bayside, California. 163 pp.

  • Bogan, A. 2013. World checklist of freshwater Bivalvia species. World Wide Web electronic publication. Version 2013 January 24.  Available online at http://fada.biodiversity.be/group/show/14. Accessed 11 July 2014.

  • Burch, J. B. 1972. Freshwater Sphaeriacean clams (Mollusca:Pelecypoda) of North America. EPA Biota of Freshwater Ecosystems Identification Manual No. 3. 31 pp.

  • Canadian Museum of Nature. P.O. Box 3443, Stn. "D", Ottawa. K1P 6P4.

  • Clarke, A. H. 1981. The freshwater molluscs of Canada. National Museum of Natural Sciences, National Museums of Canada, Ottawa. 446 pp.

  • Clarke, A.H. 1981a. The Freshwater Molluscs of Canada. National Museum of Natural Sciences, National Museums of Canada, D.W. Friesen and Sons, Ltd.: Ottawa, Canada. 446 pp.

  • General Status 2015, Environment Canada. 2015. Manitoba Mollusk species list and subnational ranks proposed by an expert.

  • Godin, B, and D. Davidge. 2013. Benthic Information System for the Yukon (BISY). Environment Canada, Whitehorse, Yukon. unpublished database.

  • Henderson, J. 1924. Mollusca of Colorado, Utah, Montana, Idaho and Wyoming. University of Colorado Studies 13(2): 65-223.

  • Herrington, H.B. 1962. A revision of the Sphaeriidae of North America (Mollusca: Pelecypoda). Miscellaneous Publications, Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan, No. 118. 74 pp.

  • Herrington, H.B. 1962. A revision of the Sphaeriidae of North America (Mollusca: Pelecypoda). Miscellaneous Publications, Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan, No. 118. 74 pp.

  • Jass, C.N., J.I. Mead, A.D. Morrison, and L.D. Agebroad. 2002. Late Pleistocene mollusks from the southern Black Hills, South Dakota. Western North American Naturalist, 62(2): 129-140.

  • La Rocque, A. 1967. Pleistocene Mollusca of Ohio. Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey Bulletin 62, Part 2. 113-365 + 8 plates.

  • Lee, J. S. 2000. The distribution and ecology of the freshwater molluscs of northern British Columbia. M.Sc. Thesis, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, British Columbia. viii + 238 pp

  • Lee, J.S. 2000. Freshwater molluscs of British Columbia: assessments for all known or potential taxa. Unpubl. rep. submitted to the BC Conservation Data Centre, Minist. Envrion., Lands and Parks, Victoria, BC. 107pp.

  • Lysne, S.J. and W.H. Clark. 2009. Mollusc survey of the lower Bruneau River, Owyhee County, Idaho, U.S.A. American Malacological Bulletin 27:167-172.

  • Mackie, G. 2014. General Status rank assessment of freshwater molluscs of British Columbia. Prepared for Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada. Gatineau, PQ.

  • Mackie, G.L. 2007. Biology of Freshwater Corbiculid and Sphaeriid Clams of North America. Ohio Biological Survey Bulletin New Series, 15(3): 436 pp.

  • Mackie, G.L. 2007. Biology of Freshwater Corbiculid and Sphaeriid Clams of North America. Ohio Biological Survey Bulletin New Series, 15(3):ix-436.

  • Royal British Columbia Museum. 675 Belleville Street, Victoria, BC. V8V 1X4.

  • Turgeon, D.D., J.F. Quinn, Jr., A.E. Bogan, E.V. Coan, F.G. Hochberg, W.G. Lyons, P.M. Mikkelsen, R.J. Neves, C.F.E. Roper, G. Rosenberg, B. Roth, A. Scheltema, F.G. Thompson, M. Vecchione, and J.D. Williams. 1998. Common and scientific names of aquatic invertebrates from the United States and Canada: Mollusks. 2nd Edition. American Fisheries Society Special Publication 26, Bethesda, Maryland: 526 pp.

  • Wildlife Management Information System (WMIS). 2006+. Geo-referenced wildlife datasets (1900 to present) from all projects conducted by Environment and Natural Resources, Government of the Northwest Territories, Canada.  Available at http://www.enr.gov.nt.ca/programs/wildlife-research/wildlife-management-information-services

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