Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus - (Ord, 1815)
Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse
Other English Common Names: Columbian sharp-tailed grouse
Synonym(s): Pedioecetes phasianellus columbianus
Taxonomic Status: Accepted
Related ITIS Name(s): Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus (Ord, 1815) (TSN 175849)
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.104539
Element Code: ABNLC13033
Informal Taxonomy: Animals, Vertebrates - Birds - Other Birds
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Animalia Craniata Aves Galliformes Phasianidae Tympanuchus
Genus Size: B - Very small genus (2-5 species)
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Concept Reference
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Concept Reference: American Ornithologists' Union (AOU). 1957. The A.O.U. Check-list of North American Birds, 5th ed. Port City Press, Inc., Baltimore, MD. 691 pp.
Concept Reference Code: B57AOU01HQUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus
Conservation Status
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NatureServe Status

Global Status: G4T3
Global Status Last Reviewed: 10Apr2016
Global Status Last Changed: 25Nov1996
Ranking Methodology Used: Ranked by inspection
Rounded Global Status: T3 - Vulnerable
Reasons: Formerly widespread from British Columbia and northern California to Montana and Colorado; now occupies less than 10% of former range; threatened by habitat loss/degradation due to agricultural practices and livestock overgrazing.
Nation: United States
National Status: N3 (05Jan1997)
Nation: Canada
National Status: N2N3 (04Feb2016)

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
United States California (SX), Colorado (S2), Idaho (SNA), Nevada (S1), Oregon (S1), Utah (S2), Wyoming (S1)
Canada British Columbia (S2S3)

Other Statuses

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent: 20,000-2,500,000 square km (about 8000-1,000,000 square miles)
Range Extent Comments: Native range: western Colorado, northeastern Utah, western Wyoming, extreme western Montana, northern Nevada, northwestern California, eastern Oregon, eastern Washington, Idaho, and southeastern British Columbia (Spomer 1987). Currently occupies less than 10% of former range; extirpated from Nevada by 1952, from California by 1960, from Oregon by 1970; nearly extirpated from Montana.

Overall Threat Impact Comments: HABITAT: Has declined due to vegetation changes caused by cattle grazing and agriculture. Kessler and Bosch (1982) surveyed biologists who manage T. P. COLUMBIANUS and found that grazing intensity and subsequent effects on residual cover were overwhelmingly identified as the major conflict in conserving the taxon. Natural succession of grasslands and shrublands to forests, accelerated or expanded geographically by artificial fire regimes, have influenced habitat quality and populations in several regions. Habitat and distribution is constrained in regions where fire suppression has reduced early and mid-successional vegetation communities. DISTURBANCE: Males are relatively tolerant of lek disturbance, but females avoid disturbed leks; disturbance may limit reproductive opportunities and hence should be minimized (Baydack and Hein 1987). When not at leks, birds tolerant of intrusion.

Short-term Trend: Decline of 10-30%
Short-term Trend Comments: Has declined greatly and now occupies less than 10% of its historic range.

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
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Global Range: (20,000-2,500,000 square km (about 8000-1,000,000 square miles)) Native range: western Colorado, northeastern Utah, western Wyoming, extreme western Montana, northern Nevada, northwestern California, eastern Oregon, eastern Washington, Idaho, and southeastern British Columbia (Spomer 1987). Currently occupies less than 10% of former range; extirpated from Nevada by 1952, from California by 1960, from Oregon by 1970; nearly extirpated from Montana.

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.

Map unavailable!:
Distribution data for U.S. states and Canadian provinces is known to be incomplete or has not been reviewed for this taxon.
Endemism: occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States CAextirpated, CO, ID, NV, OR, UT, WY
Canada BC

Range Map
No map available.


U.S. Distribution by County Help
State County Name (FIPS Code)
CO Eagle (08037)*, Garfield (08045), Grand (08049), La Plata (08067)*, Moffat (08081), Routt (08107)
OR Baker (41001)*, Harney (41025)*, Sherman (41055)*, Union (41061)*, Wallowa (41063)*
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
U.S. Distribution by Watershed Help
Watershed Region Help Watershed Name (Watershed Code)
14 Colorado headwaters (14010001)+, Eagle (14010003)+*, Colorado headwaters-Plateau (14010005)+, Upper Yampa (14050001)+, Lower Yampa (14050002)+, Little Snake (14050003)+, Animas (14080104)+*
17 Burnt (17050202)+*, Imnaha (17060102)+*, Upper Grande Ronde (17060104)+*, Wallowa (17060105)+*, Lower Grande Ronde (17060106)+*, Middle Columbia-Hood (17070105)+*, Lower Deschutes (17070306)+*, Harney-Malheur Lakes (17120001)+*
+ Natural heritage record(s) exist for this watershed
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
Ecology & Life History
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Ecology Comments: In western Idaho, summer home range averaged 1.9 sq km (Saab and Marks 1992).
Non-Migrant: Y
Locally Migrant: N
Long Distance Migrant: N
Palustrine Habitat(s): Riparian
Terrestrial Habitat(s): Grassland/herbaceous, Shrubland/chaparral
Habitat Comments: Native bunchgrass and shrub-steppe communities. In western Idaho, preferred big sagebrush habitats with moderate vegetative cover, high plant species diversity, and high structural diversity; in general selected vegetative communities that were least modified by livestock grazing (Saab and Marks 1992). Deciduous shrubs are critical for winter food and escape cover (see Saab and Marks 1992). Bunchgrasses and perennial forbs are important components of nesting and brood-rearing habitat (Saab and Marks 1992).
Adult Food Habits: Frugivore, Granivore, Herbivore, Invertivore
Immature Food Habits: Frugivore, Granivore, Herbivore, Invertivore
Food Comments: Requires woody plant buds or fruits (e.g., water birch in Washington, serviceberry in Colorado) in winter.
Adult Phenology: Diurnal
Immature Phenology: Diurnal
Economic Attributes Not yet assessed
Help
Management Summary
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Restoration Potential: Transplants have been made from Canada to Dancing Prairie, Montana (Spomer 1987).
Population/Occurrence Delineation Not yet assessed
Help
Population/Occurrence Viability
Help
U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
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Authors/Contributors
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NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Edition Date: 05Oct1995
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Author: Hammerson, G.
Element Ecology & Life History Edition Date: 01Sep1994
Element Ecology & Life History Author(s): HAMMERSON, G.

Zoological data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs) and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References
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