Astragalus neglectus - (Torr. & Gray) Sheldon
Cooper's Milkvetch
Other Common Names: Cooper's milkvetch
Taxonomic Status: Accepted
Related ITIS Name(s): Astragalus neglectus (Torr. & Gray) Sheldon (TSN 25598)
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.145328
Element Code: PDFAB0F5U0
Informal Taxonomy: Plants, Vascular - Flowering Plants - Pea Family
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Plantae Anthophyta Dicotyledoneae Fabales Fabaceae Astragalus
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Concept Reference
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Concept Reference: Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.
Concept Reference Code: B94KAR01HQUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Astragalus neglectus
Conservation Status
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NatureServe Status

Global Status: G4
Global Status Last Reviewed: 07Jun2002
Global Status Last Changed: 30Oct1995
Rounded Global Status: G4 - Apparently Secure
Reasons: Astragalus neglectus is an uncommon species with narrow requirements for its naturally disturbed habitats, which are rare across the species' range. In Minnesota, however, A. neglectus succeeds in powerline rights-of-way and under other human-created disturbance regimes (74 extant sites have been discovered in MN since 1988). This species will likely thrive for as long as current right-of-way and road-management policies continue.
Nation: United States
National Status: N4
Nation: Canada
National Status: N3 (05Sep2017)

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
United States Iowa (SNR), Michigan (S3), Minnesota (S4), New York (S1), North Dakota (S1), Ohio (S1), Pennsylvania (S1), South Dakota (SNR), Virginia (S2), West Virginia (S1), Wisconsin (S1)
Canada Manitoba (S1), Ontario (S3), Saskatchewan (SNR)

Other Statuses

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent Comments: The historical distribution of A. neglectus appears to have been from western New York and Ontario south to Virginia, and west through Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, eastern North and South Dakota, and southern Manitoba. Currently presumed extirpated from North Dakota, South Dakota, and Pennsylvania (Bowles and Betz 1988).

Number of Occurrences: 81 to >300
Number of Occurrences Comments: Most abundant in Minnesota (76 extant occurrences). Also documented from Michigan (6), New York (2), Ohio (1), Wisconsin (1), Virginia (4), and Ontario (not tracked).

Population Size Comments: Even the best populations generally include only a few hundred plants.

Overall Threat Impact Comments: The principal threat to Astragalus neglectus is the loss of a periodic disturbance regime. Threats would therefore include fire suppression, alterations in hydrology of lakeshore habitats, overly-regular maintenance of roadsides and powerline rights-of-way, and spraying of herbicides along roadsides. This species limited distribution makes it vulnerable to land-use conversion and habitat fragmentation. Human disturbance and competition from exotics may also be low-level threats (Southern Appalachian Species Viability Project 2002).

Short-term Trend: Relatively Stable (<=10% change)
Short-term Trend Comments: According to Bowles and Betz (1988), this species has declined almost 90% in extant site records and may have disappeared from much of its range. Since 1988, however, Astragalus neglectus has been located at 74 sites in Minnesota, approximately 85-90% of these in rights-of-way and other sites kept open by human disturbance (Sather pers. comm. 1995). Whether or not A. neglectus occurs at such disturbed sites in other parts of its range is unknown.

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
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Global Range: The historical distribution of A. neglectus appears to have been from western New York and Ontario south to Virginia, and west through Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, eastern North and South Dakota, and southern Manitoba. Currently presumed extirpated from North Dakota, South Dakota, and Pennsylvania (Bowles and Betz 1988).

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
Color legend for Distribution Map

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States IA, MI, MN, ND, NY, OH, PA, SD, VA, WI, WV
Canada MB, ON, SK

Range Map
No map available.


U.S. Distribution by County Help
State County Name (FIPS Code)
MI Bay (26017), Chippewa (26033), Clinton (26037)*, Delta (26041), Dickinson (26043)*, Genesee (26049)*, Gratiot (26057)*, Ingham (26065)*, Kalamazoo (26077)*, Kent (26081)*, Lapeer (26087)*, Menominee (26109), Ontonagon (26131), Presque Isle (26141), Tuscola (26157)*, Washtenaw (26161)*
MN Becker (27005), Beltrami (27007), Clearwater (27029), Hubbard (27057), Mahnomen (27087), Marshall (27089), Norman (27107), Otter Tail (27111), Pennington (27113), Polk (27119), Red Lake (27125)
NY Cayuga (36011), Erie (36029)*, Livingston (36051)
OH Geauga (39055), Lake (39085)
PA Blair (42013), Centre (42027)*, Susquehanna (42115)*
VA Alleghany (51005), Botetourt (51023), Montgomery (51121)
WI Door (55029), Kenosha (55059), Milwaukee (55079)*, Racine (55101)*, Sheboygan (55117)*
WV Grant (54023)
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
U.S. Distribution by Watershed Help
Watershed Region Help Watershed Name (Watershed Code)
02 Upper Susquehanna (02050101)+*, Bald Eagle (02050204)+*, Upper Juniata (02050302)+, South Branch Potomac (02070001)+, Upper James (02080201)+
03 Upper Roanoke (03010101)+
04 Ontonagon (04020102)+, Manitowoc-Sheboygan (04030101)+*, Door-Kewaunee (04030102)+, Menominee (04030108)+, Escanaba (04030110)+, Tacoosh-Whitefish (04030111)+, Pike-Root (04040002)+, Milwaukee (04040003)+*, St. Joseph (04050001)+*, Upper Grand (04050004)+*, Lower Grand (04050006)+*, St. Marys (04070001)+, Lone Lake-Ocqueoc (04070003)+, Pigeon-Wiscoggin (04080103)+, Pine (04080202)+*, Flint (04080204)+*, Cass (04080205)+*, Lake Huron (04080300)+*, Huron (04090005)+*, Raisin (04100002)+*, Cuyahoga (04110002)+, Grand (04110004)+, Buffalo-Eighteenmile (04120103)+*, Upper Genesee (04130002)+, Seneca (04140201)+
07 Mississippi Headwaters (07010101)+, Crow Wing (07010106)+, Pomme De Terre (07020002)+*
09 Otter Tail (09020103)+, Buffalo (09020106)+, Eastern Wild Rice (09020108)+, Sandhill-Wilson (09020301)+, Red Lake (09020303)+, Thief (09020304)+, Clearwater (09020305)+, Snake (09020309)+
+ Natural heritage record(s) exist for this watershed
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
Ecology & Life History
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Basic Description: Astragalus neglectus is a tall, erect, hollow-stemmed perennial herb. The fresh flowers are usually white or greenish-white, fading straw-color when dried.
Technical Description: "Tall, caulescent perennials with a taprood and knobby caudex; herbage with basifixed appressed or ascending hairs; stems erect, hollow, 3-9 dm tall, strict or branched. Leaves alternate, odd-pinnate, 4-12 cm long, short petioled or upper sessile; stipules distinct, 2-6 mm long; leaflets 11-25, oblong-elliptic, oblong, or oblong-obovate, 7-30 mm long. Peduncles axillary, 3-7 cm long; racemes loosely 10- to 20-flowered, flowers nodding. Pedicels to 2 mm long; calyx tube campanulate, 3.7-5 mm long, teeth 2-3 mm long; corolla whitish or pale yellow; banner 11.6-14 mm long; wings 10-13 mm long; keel 10-12.5 mm long. Legumes erect, obliquely ovoid or ovoid-ellipsoid, inflated, 1.5-3 cm long, with a short beak; seeds 2-3 mm long, yellowish, smooth." (Great Plains Flora Association, 1986)
Diagnostic Characteristics: Astragalus neglectus is likely to be mistaken only for A. canadensis, with which it is sometimes associated on lake shores in MN and elsewhere. Cooper's milkvetch is distinguished by its simple taproot, campanulate calyx with nigrescent hairs, short triangular stipules and inflorescence bracts, and inflated pods 1 cm or more thick. A. canadensis differs by its more elongated calyx with malphighian hairs, longer clasping stipules, slender bracts, olbique rhizomes, and pods less than 1 cm thick. (Bowles and Betz, 1988)
Duration: PERENNIAL
Palustrine Habitat(s): Riparian
Terrestrial Habitat(s): Cliff, Savanna
Habitat Comments: Astragalus neglectus occurs primarily on sites with a periodic disturbance regime. Habitats include the following: well-drained, sand or gravel borders of glacial lakes; open, calcareous, rocky ridges and bluffs; deep, loamy, well-drained soils, at the border between prairie and woods; and powerline rights-of-way, roadsides, and railroad beds.
Economic Attributes
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Economically Important Genus: Y
Management Summary Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Delineation Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Viability
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U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
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Authors/Contributors
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NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Edition Date: 05Jun1995
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Author: Russell, C., rev. M. Penskar;
Element Ecology & Life History Edition Date: 02Mar1992

Botanical data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs), The North Carolina Botanical Garden, and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References
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  • Barneby, R.C. 1964. Atlas of North American Astragalus. 2 Vols. New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, New York. 1188 pp.

  • Bowles, M.L. and R.F. Betz. 1988. A preliminary assessment of the status and distribution of Astragalus neglectus (T. & G.) Sheldon in the United States. 15 pp.

  • Coffin, B., and L. Pfannmuller, eds. 1988. Minnesota's endangered flora and fauna. Univ. Minnesota Press, Minneapolis. 473 pp.

  • Criddle, N. 1927. A Calendar of Flowers. Canadian Field-Naturalist. 41: 48-55.

  • Fernald, M.L. 1950. Gray's manual of botany. 8th edition. D. Van Nostrand, New York. 1632 pp.

  • Gleason, H.A., and A. Cronquist. 1991. Manual of vascular plants of northeastern United States and adjacent Canada. New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, New York. 910 pp.

  • Gleason, Henry A. and A. Cronquist. 1991. Manual of Vascular Plants of Northeastern United States and Adjacent Canada. The New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, New York. 910 pp.

  • Great Plains Flora Association (R.L. McGregor, coordinator; T.M. Barkley, ed., R.E. Brooks and E.K. Schofield, associate eds.). 1986. Flora of the Great Plains. University Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 1392 pp.

  • Herbarium, Department of Botany, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

  • Herbarium, Museum of Man and Nature, 190 Rupert Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

  • Holmgren, Noel. 1998. The Illustrated Companion to Gleason and Cronquist's Manual. Illustrations of the Vascular Plants of Northeastern United States and Adjacent Canada. The New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, New York.

  • Hutton, E.E. Jr. 1989. Four western plants new to West Virginia. Castanea 54(3):203-207.

  • Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.

  • Love, D. & J.P. Bernard. 1959. Flora and vegetation of the Otterburne area, Manitoba, Canada. Svensk Botanisk Tidskrift 53:335-461.

  • McCance, R.M., Jr., and J.F. Burns, eds. 1984. Ohio endangered and threatened vascular plants: Abstracts of state-listed taxa. Division Natural Areas and Preserves, Ohio Dept. Natural Resources, Columbus. 635 pp.

  • Mitchell, Richard S. and Gordon C. Tucker. 1997. Revised Checklist of New York State Plants. Contributions to a Flora of New York State. Checklist IV. Bulletin No. 490. New York State Museum. Albany, NY. 400 pp.

  • Natural Heritage Program Files. 1996. Unpublished.

  • New York Natural Heritage Program. 2010. Biotics database. New York Natural Heritage Program. New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. Albany, NY.

  • Reschke, Carol. 1990. Ecological communities of New York State. New York Natural Heritage Program, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. Latham, NY. 96 pp. plus xi.

  • Schultz, J. 2003. Conservation Assessment for Cooper's Milkwetch (Astragalus neglectus) (T & G) E. Sheld. USDA Forest Service, Eastern Region. 20 ppt.

  • Scoggan, H.J. 1957. Flora of Manitoba. National Museum of Canada, Bulletin number 140.

  • Scoggan, H.J. 1978-1979. The flora of Canada: Parts 1-4. National Museums Canada, Ottawa. 1711 pp.

  • Scoggan, H.J. 1978. The Flora of Canada. National Museum of Natural Sciences, National Museum of Canada, Publ. in Botany 7(4).

  • Southern Appalachian Species Viability Project. 2002. A partnership between the U.S. Forest Service-Region 8, Natural Heritage Programs in the Southeast, NatureServe, and independent scientists to develop and review data on 1300+ regionally and locally rare species in the Southern Appalachian and Alabama region. Database (Access 97) provided to the U.S. Forest Service by NatureServe, Durham, North Carolina.

  • Sutherland, D.A. 1987. The Vascular Plants of Haldimand-Norfolk. Pages 1-52 in The Natural Areas Inventory of the Regional Municipality of Haldimand-Norfolk - Volume II: Annotated Checklists. Norfolk Field Naturalists, Simcoe, Ontario.

  • Voss, E.G. 1985. Michigan Flora. Part II. Dicots (Saururaceae - Cornaceae). Cranbrook Institute of Science and University of Michigan Herbarium. Ann Arbor, Michigan. 724 pp.

  • Weldy, T. and D. Werier. 2010. New York flora atlas. [S.M. Landry, K.N. Campbell, and L.D. Mabe (original application development), Florida Center for Community Design and Research http://www.fccdr.usf.edu/. University of South Florida http://www.usf.edu/]. New York Flora Association http://wwws.nyflora.org/, Albany, New York

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