Thelesperma pubescens - Dorn
Uinta Greenthread
Other English Common Names: Hairy Greenthread
Other Common Names: hairy greenthread
Taxonomic Status: Accepted
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.160132
Element Code: PDAST980B0
Informal Taxonomy: Plants, Vascular - Flowering Plants - Aster Family
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Plantae Anthophyta Dicotyledoneae Asterales Asteraceae Thelesperma
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Concept Reference
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Concept Reference: Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.
Concept Reference Code: B94KAR01HQUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Thelesperma pubescens
Taxonomic Comments: Considered a distinct species by Kartesz (1994); thought to be most closely related to Thelesperma marginatum and/or T. subnudum. Hansen et al. (2002) reduced Thelesperma caespitosum to a variety of T. pubescens (T. pubescens Dorn var. caespitosum (Dorn) C.J. Hansen, stat. nov. thus reducing Thelesperma pubescens Dorn to type variety. Further, Hansen et al. (2002) recognize Thelesperma pubescens and T. caespitosum as conspecific (i.e., different varieties of the same species). Welsh et al. (2003) reduced Thelesperma pubescens to a variety of T. subnudum, creating the new combination of Thelespermum subnudum A. Gray var. pubescens (Dorn) S. Welsh, stat. nov.
Conservation Status
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NatureServe Status

Global Status: G2
Global Status Last Reviewed: 15Sep2011
Global Status Last Changed: 15Sep2011
Rounded Global Status: G2 - Imperiled
Reasons: Known from four Wyoming sites, all within an area of about 260 square km in southwestern Wyoming. Also reported from Utah, but no status information available from that state. Restricted entirely to soils of the Bishop Conglomerate. Take precautions to avoid negative impacts from oil and gas drilling in the area.
Nation: United States
National Status: N2

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
United States Utah (S1), Wyoming (S1)

Other Statuses

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent Comments: Endemic to foothills of the southern Green River Basin and northern Uinta Range in southwest Wyoming (where Uinta and Sweetwater counties come together, close to the Utah border). The reports of Thelesperma pubescens from Summit County, Utah (Atwood et al. 1991, Utah Plant Society 2003-04 in Heidel 2004) are in error (Welsh et al. 2003; B. Franklin pers. comm. in Heidel 2004).

Area of Occupancy: 3-125 4-km2 grid cells
Area of Occupancy Comments: Approximately 24 4-sq km grid cells. Total estimated area of rim habitat for all 4 known occurrences is 1088 acres (Heidel 2004).

Number of Occurrences: 1 - 5
Number of Occurrences Comments: Four known sites in Wyoming (3 A-ranked and 1 B-ranked) (EO data in the NatureServe central database as of July 2011). No occurrences are reported from Utah.

Population Size Comments: Estimates of population sizes indicate that total population numbers are in the 100,000 magnitude. The rough estimates were made by recording the approximate length and width of occupied habitat, making a conservative estimate of plant density across each area as a multiple and then adding the values for each subpopulation area (Heidel 2004).

Number of Occurrences with Good Viability/Integrity: Few (4-12)
Viability/Integrity Comments: All 4 occurrences are considered to have Excellent or Good estimated viability (EO data in the NatureServe central database as of July 2011).

Overall Threat Impact: Unknown
Overall Threat Impact Comments: All of the high plateaus where the species occurs have roads to them, at different levels of development and places over time. Road developments were cited as the most likely cause of existing human impacts to the species (IHI Environmental 1995 in Heidel 2004). Motorized vehicle activity in the habitat, as indicated by tire tracks, was identified as a threat to the species during the summer of 1993 (USDI BLM 1997 in Heidel 2004). However, much of its Cedar Mountain rim habitat is fenced off from the adjoining road. Some road access constructions have removed species' habitat where the roadbed cuts through the rims. The northwest rim corner of Sage Creek Mountain appears to have seen recently bull-dozing activity which may have reduced habitat and the Hickey Mountain North road access to the radio tower may have reduced habitat. Oil and gas development, including drill pads and roads, were identified as having limited impact because the habitat is generally not suited for development (Dorn 1989 in Heidel 2004). Intense livestock grazing was identified as a threat in the past, potentially reducing vigor, if not viability. Stocking numbers were reduced during 2002 and 2003 on the BLM allotments, and there were no signs of stock or stock use in 2004 (Heidel 2004). The radio tower built on Hickey Mountain North adjoins Thelesperma pubescens habitat and any expansion or alteration of surrounding grounds potentially affects the species. The access road to the tower is barely passable to 4-wheeled vehicles and any road improvements would greatly increase traffic. Quarrying for gravel was identified as another potential threat; the high quality and high volume of alluvial cobble and gravel represented by the Bishop Conglomerate Formation may represent a commercial source. (Dorn 1989 in Heidel 2004).

Short-term Trend: Relatively Stable (<=10% change)
Short-term Trend Comments: Dorn (1989) estimated about 9,200 individuals at the 4 sites. In 2003, it was estimated to total 200,000+ individuals. Whether this represents actual growth in the number of individuals or more thorough and accurate counts, is unknown. Three permanent 50 meter monitoring transects were established on Cedar and Hickey mountains to track major population trends with a minimum amount of time, providing an early warning system (Marriott 1988 in Heidel 2004). The trends in cover show relative stability of distribution patterns within transects over time. There was modest reduction in cover for at least two of the four Cedar Mountain transects. A third Cedar Mountain transect is stable likely due to a slightly more sheltered setting below the rim among scattered mountain mahogany cover. The Hickey Mountain transect is relatively stable, without a net change in cover (Heidel 2004).

Environmental Specificity: Very narrow. Specialist or community with key requirements scarce.
Environmental Specificity Comments: All Wyoming populations are in settings where microhabitat conditions have a distinct microclimate associated with them. The microhabitat is generally free of snow by the middle of May. The rim and upper slope positions receive the full force of winds, aided by gravity to maintain early succession conditions. Even though water is readily adsorbed by the soils derived from calcium carbonate bedrock, there are direct losses to evaporation and runoff (Heidel 2004).

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
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Global Range: Endemic to foothills of the southern Green River Basin and northern Uinta Range in southwest Wyoming (where Uinta and Sweetwater counties come together, close to the Utah border). The reports of Thelesperma pubescens from Summit County, Utah (Atwood et al. 1991, Utah Plant Society 2003-04 in Heidel 2004) are in error (Welsh et al. 2003; B. Franklin pers. comm. in Heidel 2004).

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
Color legend for Distribution Map

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States UT, WY

Range Map
No map available.


U.S. Distribution by County Help
State County Name (FIPS Code)
WY Sweetwater (56037), Uinta (56041)
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
U.S. Distribution by Watershed Help
Watershed Region Help Watershed Name (Watershed Code)
14 Upper Green-Flaming Gorge Reservoir (14040106)+, Blacks Fork (14040107)+
+ Natural heritage record(s) exist for this watershed
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
Ecology & Life History
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Basic Description: A perennial herb that forms a low tuft of gray-green, short-hairy, compound leaves. Flowering stems, 3-12 cm high, rise above the leaves, each bearing a single, yellow, rayless flower head. Blooms July-August.
Technical Description: Perennial with a thick, branching caudex and persistent old leaf bases; leaves pubescent throughout, appearing gray-green; flowering stems glabrous on lower portion; disk corollas yellow, ray florets and pappus lacking; blooms July.
Diagnostic Characteristics: Differs from T. caespitosum in having leaves pubescent throughout rather than only on the petioles, and in appearing more gray-green than green. It differs from T. windhamii in having no pappus and flowering stems glabrous on the lower portions.
Duration: PERENNIAL
Terrestrial Habitat(s): Grassland/herbaceous, Shrubland/chaparral
Habitat Comments: From Heidel (2004): occupies sparsely vegetated settings at the rim crest, often situated above wooded communities such as mountain mahogany communities, but also situated above cliffs or steep, unconsolidated, highly unstable slopes. Most of its habitat is classified as cushion plant community, which is distributed in broken or continuous bands from 1-10 m wide on gentle to moderate slopes of mesa rims that are straight or convex, sometimes above cliffs. The most extensive habitat is on west- facing slopes, but all other aspects are represented.

Occurs on the Bishop Conglomerate which caps large erosion benches and pediments. This formation consists of well-rounded cobbles and boulders, with red quartzite from the Uinta Range, as well as limestone and metamorphic rock that are locally common. Soils at the rims are poorly developed and generally characterized as shallow, sandy loam with many cobbles and gravel intermixed. The forces of wind and water erosion have left a gravel residuum overlying the substrate, forming gravel pavements. Elevations range from 8040-8960 feet (2450-2730 m).

Economic Attributes Not yet assessed
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Management Summary
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Stewardship Overview: Monitor population trends, particularly in areas being grazed. Maintain barriers to prevent ATV use and road widening. Any changes to the area should be carefully planned to avoid damaging plants or habitat. Revisit sites to confirm status and level of threats.


Population/Occurrence Delineation Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Viability
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U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
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Authors/Contributors
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NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Edition Date: 21Sep1987
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Author: MARRIOTT, H., rev. W. Fertig/K. Maybury (1996), rev. M. Russo (2011)
Management Information Edition Date: 22Sep2011
Management Information Edition Author: Russo, M.

Botanical data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs), The North Carolina Botanical Garden, and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References
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  • Amidon, Barbara. 1994. Special status plant species in the Rock Springs District, BLM. Memo updated 9-30-94.

  • Andersen, M.D. and B. Heidel. 2011. HUC-based species range maps. Prepared by Wyoming Natural Diversity Database for use in the pilot WISDOM application operational from inception to yet-to-be-determined date of update of tool.

  • Cronquist, A. 1994. Intermountain Flora; Vascular Plants of the Intermountain West, U.S.A. Volume 5: Asterales. The New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, NY.

  • Dorn, R. D. 1983. A new species of Thelesperma (Asteraceae) from Wyoming. Western North American Naturalist 43:749-750.

  • Dorn, R. D. 1989. Report on the status of Thelesperma pubescens, a Candidate Threatened species. Unpublished report prepared for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service by Mountain West Environmental Services, Cheyenne, WY.

  • Dorn, R. D. 1992. Vascular Plants of Wyoming, second edition. Mountain West Publishing, Cheyenne, WY.

  • Dorn, R. D. 2001. Vascular Plants of Wyoming, third edition. Mountain West Publishing, Cheyenne, WY.

  • Dorn, R.D. 1983. A new species of Thelesperma (Asteraceae) from Wyoming. Great Basin Naturalist 43: 749-750.

  • Dorn, R.D. 1989. Report on the status of Thelesperma pubescens, a candidate Threatened species. Unpublished report prepared for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  • Fertig, W. 2001. State Species Abstract: Thelesperma pubescens. Wyoming Natural Diversity Database. Available on the internet at www.uwyo.edu/wyndd.

  • Fertig, W. and R. Thurston. 2003. Modeling the potential distribution of BLM Sensitive and USFWS Threatened and Endangered plant species in Wyoming. Unpublished report prepared for the Bureau of Land Management Wyoming State Office by the Wyoming Natural Diversity Database, Laramie, WY.

  • Fertig, W., C. Refsdal, and J. Whipple. 1994. Wyoming Rare Plant Field Guide. Wyoming Rare Plant Technical Committee, Cheyenne, WY.

  • Fertig, W., C. Refsdal, and J. Whipple. 1994. Wyoming rare plant field guide. Wyoming Rare Plant Technical Committee, Cheyenne. No pagination.

  • Fertig, W., L. Welp, and S. Markow. 1998. The status of rare plants in southwest Wyoming. Unpublished report prepared for the Bureau of Land Management by the Wyoming Natural Diversity Database, Laramie, WY.

  • Hansen, C. J. 1998. Biosystematic analysis of the Thelesperma subnudum (Asteraceae) complex. Masters Thesis. Brigham Young University, Provo, UT.

  • Hansen, C.J., L. Allphin, and M.D. Windham. 2002. Biosystematic analysis of the Thelesperma subnudum complex (Asteraceae). Sida 20(1):71-96.

  • Hartman, R. L. and C. H. Refsdal. 1995. Status report on the general floristic inventory of southwest Wyoming and adjacent northeast Utah. Unpublished report prepared for the Bureau of Land Management Wyoming State Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Region 4, U.S. Forest Service, by the Rocky Mountain Herbarium, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY.

  • Heidel, B. 2004. Status of Thelesperma pubescens (Uinta greenthread) in Wyoming. Report prepared for the Bureau of Land Management. Wyoming Natural Diversity Database, Laramie. 53 pp.

  • Heidel, B. 2004. Status of Thelesperma pubescens (Uinta greenthread) in Wyoming. Unpublished report prepared for the Bureau of Land Management by the Wyoming Natural Diversity Database, Laramie, WY.

  • IHI Environmental. 1995. Conservation strategy and action plan: Thelesperma pubescens (Uinta greenthread). Prepared for Wasatch-Cache National Forest. 20 pp. + appendices.

  • IHI Environmental. 1995. Draft conservation strategy and action plan, Thelesperma pubescens (Uinta greenthread). Unpublished report prepared for Wasatch-Cache National Forest by IHI Environmental, Salt Lake City, UT.

  • Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.

  • Marriott, H. J. 1988. Draft habitat management plan for threatened, endangered and sensitive plant species and their habitats on the Rock Springs District, Bureau of Land Management. Unpublished report prepared for the Bureau of Land Management by the Wyoming Natural Diversity Database, Laramie, WY.

  • Marriott, H. J. 1988. Inventory and monitoring of Thelesperma pubescens (Uinta greenthread), a Category 2 candidate plant species for federal listing, on Wasatch National Forest and the Rock Springs District, Bureau of Land Management. Unpublished report prepared for the Bureau of Land Management by the Wyoming Natural Diversity Database, Laramie, WY.

  • Marriott, H.J. 1988. Inventory and monitoring of Thelesperma pubescens (Uinta greenthread), a category 2 candidate plant species for federal listing, on Wasatch National Forest and the Rock Springs District, Bureau of Land Management. Unpublished report prepared by the Wyoming Natural Diversity Database, Laramie, WY.

  • Refsdal, C. H. 1996. A general floristic inventory of southwest Wyoming and adjacent northeast Utah, 1994-1995. Unpublished report prepared for the Bureau of Land Management Wyoming State Office, Bureau of Land Management Vernal Supervisor's Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and U.S. Forest Service Region 4 by the Rocky Mountain Herbarium, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY.

  • Spahr, R., L. Armstrong, D. Atwood, and M. Rath (comp.). 1991. Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive Species of the Intermountain Region. US Forest Service Region 4, Ogden, UT. (not paginated)

  • Strother, J. L. 2006. Thelesperma. Pages 199-203 in Flora of North America Editorial Committee, editor. Flora of North America North of Mexico. Vol. 21. Magnoliophyta: Asteridae (in part): Asteraceae part 3. Oxford University Press, New York, NY.

  • Utah Native Plant Society. 2003-2005. Utah Rare Plant Guide. Salt Lake City, UT. Online. Available: http://www.utahrareplants.org. (Accessed 2005)

  • Welsh, S.L., N.D. Atwood, S. Goodrich and L.C. Higgins. (Eds.) 2003. A Utah Flora. 3rd edition. Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, U.S.A. 912 pp.

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