Solidago villosicarpa - R.J. LeBlond
Coastal Goldenrod
Other English Common Names: LeBlond's Goldenrod
Other Common Names: hairy-seed goldenrod
Taxonomic Status: Provisionally accepted
Related ITIS Name(s): Solidago villosicarpa LeBlond (TSN 780517)
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.148511
Element Code: PDAST8P3A0
Informal Taxonomy: Plants, Vascular - Flowering Plants - Aster Family
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Plantae Anthophyta Dicotyledoneae Asterales Asteraceae Solidago
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Concept Reference
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Concept Reference: LeBlond, R.J. 2000. Solidago villosicarpa (Asteraceae: Astereae), a rare new Southeastern Coastal Plain endemic. Sida 19(2): 291-300.
Concept Reference Code: A00LEB01HQUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Solidago villosicarpa
Taxonomic Comments: Sometimes called LeBlond's Goldenrod (Weakley 2000), Camp LeJeune Goldenrod, or Coastal Goldenrod.
Conservation Status
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NatureServe Status

Global Status: G1
Global Status Last Reviewed: 07Sep2005
Global Status Last Changed: 19Jul1993
Rounded Global Status: G1 - Critically Imperiled
Reasons: A recently described species of goldenrod (LeBlond, 2000) known only from a few sites on the outer Coastal Plain in North Carolina.
Nation: United States
National Status: N1

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
United States North Carolina (S1)

Other Statuses

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent Comments: Endemic to a four-county area of the outer coastal plain of North Carolina. All populations are within 1000 feet of estuarine habitats (LeBlond 2004).

Number of Occurrences: 1 - 5
Number of Occurrences Comments: This species was first collected in Brunswick County, NC, in 1949 by Godfrey and Fox, who sent a specimen to Cronquist at NY Botanical Garden for identification. A second specimen was collected and misidentified in 1950 and deposited at the NC State University herbarium. The next collection was made in 1963 and was misidentified as yet another species. Richard LeBlond rediscovered the species during the Natural Heritage inventory of Camp Lejeune and subsequently found the previously misidentified records. All known populations are in North Carolina. Currently known from four populations, three in Onslow County and one in Pender County. Of the four current populations, 1 is A rank, 1 B rank, 1 C rank, and 1 CD rank.

Population Size Comments: Known from four populations, where counts range from 100 to 1400 individuals.

Number of Occurrences with Good Viability/Integrity: Very few (1-3)

Overall Threat Impact Comments: Invasive species present a low threat, particularly mimosa (Albizia julibrissin).

Short-term Trend: Decline of 10-30%
Short-term Trend Comments: Extant in two of the four counties from which it was historically known (LeBlond, 2000). First collections were in 1949 and 1950, but not recognized as distinct until 1990's, and formally named in 2000 (LeBlond, 2000).

Intrinsic Vulnerability Comments: Vulnerable to decline with canopy closure, but responds favorably to disturbance, including hurricanes (cf. LeBlond 2000).

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
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Global Range: Endemic to a four-county area of the outer coastal plain of North Carolina. All populations are within 1000 feet of estuarine habitats (LeBlond 2004).

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
Color legend for Distribution Map

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States NC

Range Map
No map available.


U.S. Distribution by County Help
State County Name (FIPS Code)
NC Brunswick (37019), Craven (37049), Dare (37055), New Hanover (37129)*, Onslow (37133), Pender (37141)
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
U.S. Distribution by Watershed Help
Watershed Region Help Watershed Name (Watershed Code)
03 Albemarle (03010205)+, Middle Neuse (03020202)+, Lower Neuse (03020204)+, New River (03020302)+, Lower Cape Fear (03030005)+, Northeast Cape Fear (03030007)+, Coastal Carolina (03040208)+
+ Natural heritage record(s) exist for this watershed
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
Ecology & Life History
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Basic Description: Plant, dicot, Asteraceae; non- to short-rhizomatous, perennial herb.
Technical Description: Rosettes can reach up to 30 cm across, possibly indicating a long juvenile stage. The plants reach 1.5 meters high and stems are 1-1.5 cm thick. The species is rarely rhizomatous.
Ecology Comments: The best populations occur in Coastal Fringe Evergreen forest with live oak, sand laurel oak, and loblolly pine. Other collections are within a Live Oak Thicket/ Maritime Forest and a Mesic Hardwood Forest (LeBlond 2004).
Terrestrial Habitat(s): Forest - Hardwood, Forest - Mixed, Forest Edge, Forest/Woodland, Shrubland/chaparral, Woodland - Conifer
Habitat Comments: Endemic to the outer Coastal Plain and always associated with a maritime influence (including freshwater tidal habitats). Extant populations occur on mainland areas either along the coast or adjacent to inland tidal systems on upland terraces that gradually to abruptly slope to adjacent tidelands (swamps, marshes, or creeks). None of the extant populations occurs in habitat that is in its historical natural condition. The most likely natural community types at population sites are Dry Oak-Hickory Forest and Dry-Mesic Oak-Hickory Forest, ranging to the edge of mesic Coastal Fringe Evergreen Forest. The communities are characterized by moderately dense to dense canopies of oak, hickory, and pine and often have open understories. One site may have been a longleaf pine community before it was logged, although there is no evidence to suggest that this species is adapted to fire-dependent longleaf pine communities. A historical collection was made on "live-oak scrub on sand dunes" on a coastal barrier island, suggesting that the species has also occurred in the Maritime Shrub and Maritime Evergreen Forest communities of dry to wet-mesic barrier beach sands. Another historical collection was made on a "sandy roadside."

This species is generally associated with natural and human-caused disturbances. However, it is apparently not fire-adapted, but it may be fire-tolerant. All four current sites were logged in the past. Two sites were impacted by hurricanes in 1996 and 1998, and plants there showed a "vigorous response" to tree blow-downs. Plants also appear to respond positively to canopy openings from logging and have been found in roadbeds. Sunlight is beneficial to the species and increases branching in inflorescence, consequently increasing flower and seed production. Populations have been observed flowering in more shaded conditions, but with fewer and less robust individuals. It is probable that prolonged full shading is detrimental to populations.

In general, soils are dry to wet mesic and range from excessively drained to well-drained. Co-occurring species include Pinus taeda, Liquidambar styraciflua, Quercus virginiana, Q. falcata, Q. stellata, Q. margarettiae, Q. nigra, Myrica cerifera var. cerifera, Symplocos tinctoria, Diospyros virginiana; Chasmanthium laxum, Panicum anceps var. rhizomatum, Pteridium aquilium var. pseudocaudatum, and Aristida purpurascens.

Economic Attributes Not yet assessed
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Management Summary Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Delineation Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Viability
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U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
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Authors/Contributors
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NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Edition Date: 07Sep2005
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Author: M. Franklin
Element Ecology & Life History Edition Date: 07Sep2005
Element Ecology & Life History Author(s): M. Franklin

Botanical data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs), The North Carolina Botanical Garden, and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References
Help
  • LeBlond, R.J. 1996. Inventory of Rare Species, Natural Communities, and Critical Areas of Camp Lejeune Marine Corps Base, North Carolina - Phase III (draft).

  • LeBlond, R.J. 2000. Solidago villosicarpa (Asteraceae: Astereae), a rare new Southeastern Coastal Plain endemic. Sida 19(2): 291-300.

  • LeBlond, R.J. 2000. Solidago villosicarpa (Asteraceae: Astereae), a rare new southeastern coastal plain endemic. Sida 19(2):291-300.

  • Weakley, A.S. 2000. Flora of the Carolinas and Virginia: working draft of May 15, 2000. Unpublished draft, The Nature Conservancy, Southern Resource Office.

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