Solidago shortii - Torr. & Gray
Short's Goldenrod
Other Common Names: Short's goldenrod
Taxonomic Status: Accepted
Related ITIS Name(s): Solidago shortii Torr. & A. Gray (TSN 36305)
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.140598
Element Code: PDAST8P1T0
Informal Taxonomy: Plants, Vascular - Flowering Plants - Aster Family
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Plantae Anthophyta Dicotyledoneae Asterales Asteraceae Solidago
Check this box to expand all report sections:
Concept Reference
Help
Concept Reference: Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.
Concept Reference Code: B94KAR01HQUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Solidago shortii
Conservation Status
Help

NatureServe Status

Global Status: G1
Global Status Last Reviewed: 15Jul2004
Global Status Last Changed: 23Jun1986
Rounded Global Status: G1 - Critically Imperiled
Reasons: Known only from northern Kentucky, and adjacent Indiana. The few known natural occurrences are all clustered in a small area near the juncture of Fleming, Nicholas, and Robertson counties, Kentucky. Buchele et al. (1989) counted over 73,000 stems in this small area but noted that since the species reproduces vegetatively, the large number of stems may represent relatively few individual genotypes. Previously thought extirpated from Indiana, but a naturally occurring population of Solidago shortii was found by Natural Heritage botanists on August 2001 in Harrison County, Indiana (M. Homoya, pers. comm.). All occurrences of this species are small remnant patches of glade/forest complex and none continuously covers more than an acre. Population sizes are small. Species is highly localized which makes it vulnerable to catastrophic population impacts such as disease.
Nation: United States
National Status: N1

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
United States Indiana (S1), Kentucky (S1)

Other Statuses

U.S. Endangered Species Act (USESA): LE: Listed endangered (05Sep1985)
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Lead Region: R4 - Southeast

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent Comments: Known only from the vicinity of Blue Licks, KY. Michael Homoya (Indiana Natural Heritage Data Center's botanist) notes that an 1844 report from Indiana was mentioned in Dr. Asahel Clapp's journal (a physician and botanist from Albany, Indiana) (Homoya, 1996).

Area of Occupancy: 3-125 4-km2 grid cells
Area of Occupancy Comments: Current (1999) area of occupancy limited to 12.2 square km in the Eden Shale Belt (Walck et al. 1999b).

Number of Occurrences: 6 - 20
Number of Occurrences Comments: Little natural habitat remains within the known range of the plant or thorughout KY. Inventories have been conducted and make it doubtful that other occurrences will be found. Baskin and others, who have studied the species for over 15 years suggest that there are 14 populations (2000).

Population Size Comments: Fewer than several hundred individuals are presently known but Braun commented in 1942 that the species was common in overgrazed pasture in the Blue Licks area. Total number of aboveground stems in 1989 was 73620, with an unknown number of genetic individuals (Baskin et al. 2000).

Number of Occurrences with Good Viability/Integrity: Very few to few (1-12)
Viability/Integrity Comments: Something less than the known populations are estimated to have good viability. At least one population is thought to consist of just one (or very few) genetic individuals ("one clump") (Baskin et al. 2000).

Overall Threat Impact: Unknown
Overall Threat Impact Comments: Primary threats have been identified as vegetation competition and habitat destruction for other land uses.

Short-term Trend: Decline of 10-30%

Long-term Trend: Decline of <70% to Relatively Stable
Long-term Trend Comments: No evidence of a range extension since it was first discovered in the late 1930's (Buchele et al. 1992).

Intrinsic Vulnerability Comments: The plant is clonal and is capable of persisting after some disturbance. Survivorship curves are typical of other herbaceous perennials (Walck et al. 1999b). Only 0. 7% of 1344 plants flowered in the field after 9 years even though plants grown in 'benign' conditions flower readily - but this is not necessarily different from more widespread and common Solidago spp. (Walck et al. 1999b). Does not produce a long-lived seed bank (Walck et al. 1999a).

Environmental Specificity: Very narrow. Specialist or community with key requirements scarce.
Environmental Specificity Comments: Limited to early successional limestone glades in the Bluegrass region of Kentucky.

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
Help
Global Range: Known only from the vicinity of Blue Licks, KY. Michael Homoya (Indiana Natural Heritage Data Center's botanist) notes that an 1844 report from Indiana was mentioned in Dr. Asahel Clapp's journal (a physician and botanist from Albany, Indiana) (Homoya, 1996).

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
Color legend for Distribution Map

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States IN, KY

Range Map
No map available.


U.S. Distribution by County Help
State County Name (FIPS Code)
IN Harrison (18061)
KY Fleming (21069), Harrison (21097), Jefferson (21111)*, Nicholas (21181), Robertson (21201)
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
U.S. Distribution by Watershed Help
Watershed Region Help Watershed Name (Watershed Code)
05 Licking (05100101)+, Silver-Little Kentucky (05140101)+*, Blue-Sinking (05140104)+
+ Natural heritage record(s) exist for this watershed
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
Ecology & Life History
Help
Basic Description: A perennial herb, usually with several erect stems, 5-13 dm tall, that bears a cluster of golden yellow flower heads in the fall (late August to early November).
Diagnostic Characteristics: According to Medley (1980) Solidago shortii, occurs with Solidago canadensis (=S. altissima) and S. nemoralis but S. shortii is generally smaller than S. altissima, usually no more than 1 m tall (versus 2.5 m) and has glabrous leaves with minute teeth (versus pubescent leaves with noticeable teeth). It differs from S. nemoralis in having its largest leaves near the middle of the stem instead of at the base and by having glabrous leaves.
Reproduction Comments: Does not appear to form a long-lived seed bank (Walck et al. 1999a).
Palustrine Habitat(s): HERBACEOUS WETLAND, Riparian
Terrestrial Habitat(s): Bare rock/talus/scree, Barrens, Forest Edge, Forest/Woodland, Grassland/herbaceous, Old field, Woodland - Hardwood
Habitat Comments: Cedar glades and glade-like habitats (for example, powerline right-of-ways, roadside ledges, and meadows/pastures), where droughty soils prevent the establishment of trees and shrubs. Also on roadsides and on dry, rocky, overgrazed pastures. Although the plants are most vigorous in full sun, once they are established, they can persist for extended periods of time as succession from pasture to woodland occurs. Seedlings appear to be limited to relatively bare soil in glades, roadsides and wood edges.

Another description reads: natural openings within open, dry, oak-hickory woods; a historical habitat is recorded on a gravel bar of the Ohio river.

Economic Attributes Not yet assessed
Help
Management Summary
Help
Stewardship Overview: Solidago shortii is a poor competitor (Baskin et al. 2000), successful management requires removal of successional herbaceous and woody growth (for example, by mowing or grazing). This habitat then becomes susceptible to invasion by non-native species, and must be managed for their exclusion as well.
Population/Occurrence Delineation Not yet assessed
Help
Population/Occurrence Viability
Help
Excellent Viability: Over 300 healthy plants occurring in a natural community of over 10 acres in size or along a stream/river with continuous natural vegetation for one mile that includes and buffers the population. Habitat is maintained by edaphic conditions or by other disturbance regimes.
Good Viability: About 300-150 plants occurring in a natural community of over 10 acres in size or along a stream/river with continuous natural vegetation for one mile that includes and buffers the population. Habitat is maintained by edaphic conditions or by other disturbance regimes.
Fair Viability: About 150-50 plants, the habitat is generally dominanted by natural vegetation but may be degraded in quality.
Poor Viability: Fewer than 50 plants in any habitat.
Justification: Based on the population sizes known for this species. Habitat is maintained by periodic disturbance or by edaphic conditions and necessary for continued population viablity.
Key for Ranking Species Element Occurrences Using the Generic Approach (2008).
Date: 25Jan2005
Author: White, D.
U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
Help
Authors/Contributors
Help
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Edition Date: 18Sep1996
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Author: D.White (1996), rev. L. Morse (2000)
Management Information Edition Date: 10Aug2004
Management Information Edition Author: Fellows, M.

Botanical data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs), The North Carolina Botanical Garden, and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References
Help
  • Baskin, J.M., J.L. Walck, C.C. Baskin, and D.E. Buchele. 2000. Ecology and conservation biology of the endangered plant species Solidago shortii (Asteraceae). Native Plants Journal 1(1):35-41.

  • Buchele, D.E., J.M. Baskin and C.C. Baskin. 1992. Ecology of the endangered species Solidago shortii. IV. Pollination ecology. Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 119(2):137-141.

  • Buchele, D.E., J.M. Baskin, and C.C. Baskin. 1989. Ecology of the endangered species Solidago shortii. I. Geography, populations, and physical habitat. Bull. Torrey Botanical Club 116(4): 344-355.

  • Homoya, M.A. 1996. The return of Short's goldenrod. Endangered Species bulletin, March/April, Volume XX1(2): 24-25.

  • Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.

  • Lowe, D.W., J.R. Matthews, and C.J. Moseley, eds. 1990. The official World Wildlife Fund guide to endangered species of North America. Beacham Publishing, Washington, D.C. 1180 pp.

  • Medley, M. E. 1980. Status report for Solidago shortii Torr. & Gray. Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission, Frankfort.

  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 1985. Endangered status for Solidago shortii (Short's goldenrod). Federal Register 50(172): 36085-36088.

  • Walck, J.L., J.M. Baskin and C.C. Baskin. 1992a. Ecology of the endangered species Solidago shortii. VI. Effects of habitat type, leaf litter, and soil type on seed germination. Journal of the Torrey Botanical Club 126(2):117-123.

  • Walck, J.L., J.M. Baskin, and C.C. Baskin. 1999b. Ecology of the endangered species Solidago shortii. VII. Survivorship and flowering, and comparison with common, geographically-widespread Solidago species. Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society 126(2):124-132.

Use Guidelines & Citation

Use Guidelines and Citation

The Small Print: Trademark, Copyright, Citation Guidelines, Restrictions on Use, and Information Disclaimer.

Note: All species and ecological community data presented in NatureServe Explorer at http://explorer.natureserve.org were updated to be current with NatureServe's central databases as of March 2018.
Note: This report was printed on

Trademark Notice: "NatureServe", NatureServe Explorer, The NatureServe logo, and all other names of NatureServe programs referenced herein are trademarks of NatureServe. Any other product or company names mentioned herein are the trademarks of their respective owners.

Copyright Notice: Copyright © 2018 NatureServe, 4600 N. Fairfax Dr., 7th Floor, Arlington Virginia 22203, U.S.A. All Rights Reserved. Each document delivered from this server or web site may contain other proprietary notices and copyright information relating to that document. The following citation should be used in any published materials which reference the web site.

Citation for data on website including State Distribution, Watershed, and Reptile Range maps:
NatureServe. 2018. NatureServe Explorer: An online encyclopedia of life [web application]. Version 7.1. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia. Available http://explorer.natureserve.org. (Accessed:

Citation for Bird Range Maps of North America:
Ridgely, R.S., T.F. Allnutt, T. Brooks, D.K. McNicol, D.W. Mehlman, B.E. Young, and J.R. Zook. 2003. Digital Distribution Maps of the Birds of the Western Hemisphere, version 1.0. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Acknowledgement Statement for Bird Range Maps of North America:
"Data provided by NatureServe in collaboration with Robert Ridgely, James Zook, The Nature Conservancy - Migratory Bird Program, Conservation International - CABS, World Wildlife Fund - US, and Environment Canada - WILDSPACE."

Citation for Mammal Range Maps of North America:
Patterson, B.D., G. Ceballos, W. Sechrest, M.F. Tognelli, T. Brooks, L. Luna, P. Ortega, I. Salazar, and B.E. Young. 2003. Digital Distribution Maps of the Mammals of the Western Hemisphere, version 1.0. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Acknowledgement Statement for Mammal Range Maps of North America:
"Data provided by NatureServe in collaboration with Bruce Patterson, Wes Sechrest, Marcelo Tognelli, Gerardo Ceballos, The Nature Conservancy-Migratory Bird Program, Conservation International-CABS, World Wildlife Fund-US, and Environment Canada-WILDSPACE."

Citation for Amphibian Range Maps of the Western Hemisphere:
IUCN, Conservation International, and NatureServe. 2004. Global Amphibian Assessment. IUCN, Conservation International, and NatureServe, Washington, DC and Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Acknowledgement Statement for Amphibian Range Maps of the Western Hemisphere:
"Data developed as part of the Global Amphibian Assessment and provided by IUCN-World Conservation Union, Conservation International and NatureServe."

NOTE: Full metadata for the Bird Range Maps of North America is available at:
http://www.natureserve.org/library/birdDistributionmapsmetadatav1.pdf.

Full metadata for the Mammal Range Maps of North America is available at:
http://www.natureserve.org/library/mammalsDistributionmetadatav1.pdf.

Restrictions on Use: Permission to use, copy and distribute documents delivered from this server is hereby granted under the following conditions:
  1. The above copyright notice must appear in all copies;
  2. Any use of the documents available from this server must be for informational purposes only and in no instance for commercial purposes;
  3. Some data may be downloaded to files and altered in format for analytical purposes, however the data should still be referenced using the citation above;
  4. No graphics available from this server can be used, copied or distributed separate from the accompanying text. Any rights not expressly granted herein are reserved by NatureServe. Nothing contained herein shall be construed as conferring by implication, estoppel, or otherwise any license or right under any trademark of NatureServe. No trademark owned by NatureServe may be used in advertising or promotion pertaining to the distribution of documents delivered from this server without specific advance permission from NatureServe. Except as expressly provided above, nothing contained herein shall be construed as conferring any license or right under any NatureServe copyright.
Information Warranty Disclaimer: All documents and related graphics provided by this server and any other documents which are referenced by or linked to this server are provided "as is" without warranty as to the currentness, completeness, or accuracy of any specific data. NatureServe hereby disclaims all warranties and conditions with regard to any documents provided by this server or any other documents which are referenced by or linked to this server, including but not limited to all implied warranties and conditions of merchantibility, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement. NatureServe makes no representations about the suitability of the information delivered from this server or any other documents that are referenced to or linked to this server. In no event shall NatureServe be liable for any special, indirect, incidental, consequential damages, or for damages of any kind arising out of or in connection with the use or performance of information contained in any documents provided by this server or in any other documents which are referenced by or linked to this server, under any theory of liability used. NatureServe may update or make changes to the documents provided by this server at any time without notice; however, NatureServe makes no commitment to update the information contained herein. Since the data in the central databases are continually being updated, it is advisable to refresh data retrieved at least once a year after its receipt. The data provided is for planning, assessment, and informational purposes. Site specific projects or activities should be reviewed for potential environmental impacts with appropriate regulatory agencies. If ground-disturbing activities are proposed on a site, the appropriate state natural heritage program(s) or conservation data center can be contacted for a site-specific review of the project area (see Visit Local Programs).

Feedback Request: NatureServe encourages users to let us know of any errors or significant omissions that you find in the data through (see Contact Us). Your comments will be very valuable in improving the overall quality of our databases for the benefit of all users.