Sedum moranii - Clausen
Rogue River Stonecrop
Other English Common Names: Glandular Stonecrop, Moran's Stonecrop, Reid's Stonecrop
Synonym(s): Cotyledon glandulifera Henderson ;Gormania glandulifera (Henderson) Abrams
Taxonomic Status: Accepted
Related ITIS Name(s): Sedum moranii Clausen (TSN 24137)
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.141573
Element Code: PDCRA0A0P0
Informal Taxonomy: Plants, Vascular - Flowering Plants - Stonecrop Family
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Plantae Anthophyta Dicotyledoneae Rosales Crassulaceae Sedum
Check this box to expand all report sections:
Concept Reference
Help
Concept Reference: Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.
Concept Reference Code: B94KAR01HQUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Sedum moranii
Taxonomic Comments: Originally described as Cotyledon glandulifera Henderson; moved into the genus Sedum as Sedum glanduliferum (Henderson) M.E. Peck, but it was later discovered that a homonym, Sedum glanduliferum Gussone, had been published earlier (1827). The species in Sedum was therefore renamed Sedum moranii Clausen (Clausen 1942). Denton (1982) notes that S. moranii is the most distinctive, and perhaps the most evolutionarily remote, species in Sedum section Gormania; it is a geographically and habitat-restricted diploid, considered to be a putative relic with no clear-cut affinities within the genus.
Conservation Status
Help

NatureServe Status

Global Status: G2
Global Status Last Reviewed: 18Sep2015
Global Status Last Changed: 18Sep2015
Ranking Methodology Used: Ranked by calculator
Rounded Global Status: G2 - Imperiled
Reasons: Twenty extant populations, limited to serpentine or volcanic cliffs in Josephine County, Oregon, mainly along the Rogue River and surrounding forest lands. More populations are likely to be found if all suitable habitat is surveyed (BLM). Many threats are known to exist in its range but it is unclear how many populations are directly under threat. Only a few populations have noted loss due to collecting or browsing, or possible threats due to logging, mining, or fire. Documented range is significantly larger than when this species was last ranked in 2010.
Nation: United States
National Status: N2

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
United States Oregon (S2)

Other Statuses

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent Comments: Endemic to southwestern Oregon (Meinke 1982). Range extent is 590 sq km, calculated with convex hull for all known EOs.

Area of Occupancy: 26-125 4-km2 grid cells
Area of Occupancy Comments: Twenty-eight 4 sq km grid cells occupied. BLM sighting reports speculate that more populations will be found if all suitable habitat is surveyed.

Number of Occurrences: 6 - 20
Number of Occurrences Comments: Twenty extant records using 1 km separation distance.

Population Size Comments: Estimated 9,970 individuals reported plus several populations where individuals were not reported:sum of these is greater than 10,000.

Number of Occurrences with Good Viability/Integrity: Few (4-12)
Viability/Integrity Comments: Eight populations with good or excellent viability.

Overall Threat Impact: Very high - high
Overall Threat Impact Comments: Threatened by horticultural collecting, recreational use, trail maintenance, and flooding (Meinke 1982). Some evidence of browsing (BLM 2000). May be threatened by nearby mining, logging, road activities, motorcycle or ATV paths (BLM sighting reports). Only a few EOs document any risk (collection, browsing, possible logging, mining, or fire). Not vulnerable/presumed stable with regards to climate change.

Short-term Trend: Unknown
Short-term Trend Comments: Very few revisits with which to judge trends.

Long-term Trend: Unknown

Environmental Specificity: Narrow. Specialist or community with key requirements common.
Environmental Specificity Comments: Open, dry serpentine or volcanic outcrops and cliffs on west or south-west aspects at 180-830 m elevation in Josephine County, mainly along the Rogue River.

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
Help
Global Range: Endemic to southwestern Oregon (Meinke 1982). Range extent is 590 sq km, calculated with convex hull for all known EOs.

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
Color legend for Distribution Map

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States OR

Range Map
No map available.


U.S. Distribution by County Help
State County Name (FIPS Code)
OR Josephine (41033)
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
U.S. Distribution by Watershed Help
Watershed Region Help Watershed Name (Watershed Code)
17 Lower Rogue (17100310)+, Illinois (17100311)+
+ Natural heritage record(s) exist for this watershed
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
Ecology & Life History
Help
Basic Description: A succulent, cluster-forming perennial herb, 1.5-2.7 dm tall, often with reddish-purple or purple tinged herbage at maturity. Greenish-yellow flowers bloom on stems that are densely covered with gland-tipped hairs. Blooms from late May to mid June, rarely into early July.
General Description: Succulent perennial herb with a greenish to reddish-purple stem whose top portion is densely glandular, 15-33 cm tall from a stout rootstock. Basal leaves flat spoon-shaped in a dense rosette. Stem leaves alternate and oblong. Petals yellow to greenish-yellow, 12-15 mm long, with stamens equaling to slightly longer than the calyx.
Technical Description: Succulent perennial herb, greenish to reddish-purple (except flowers). Bare, rather long, stout rootstocks (to 1 cm thick) bearing compact, dense terminal rosettes 2-7 cm in diameter, the internodes up to 3 mm long; offsets 0-4 (9), borne on branchlets 1-4 cm long. Rosette leaves ascending, spatulate to oblong-oblanceolate with apex subacute and grooved, 17-40 mm long, 8-17 mm wide at the widest point 4-6 mm from the apex, thick (2-4 mm thickness), stiff, rather flat, somewhat glaucous. Stems erect (recurved when young) or occasionally abruptly decumbent at base, 15-33 cm tall, glabrous below, densely glandular above. Cauline leaves alternate, ascending, oblong, sessile, base not spurred, not scarious, apex widely rounded to obtuse or emarginate, with papillose-crenulate appendage, 9-16(-28) mm long, 4-8(-14) mm wide, 2-4 mm thick, blade green, glaucous when young, laminar, surfaces of proximal leaves glabrous, of distal leaves glandular-hairy. Inflorescences obconic, (2-)3 branched cymes with branches typically simple and ascending, 6-9 cm long, densely glandular-puberulent, 19-30-flowered. Floral bracts oblong-spatulate, glandular-ciliate, 0.5-1.4 cm long below, much reduced upwards. Pedicels 1-4(-5) mm long. Flowers 5-merous. Sepals erect, green, lanceolate or ovate, apically acute (sometimes obtuse), united for 1-2 mm at base, equal, 5-8.5 mm long, 2-4.5 mm wide, glandular-pubescent. Petals erect, primrose-yellow to clear greenish-yellow, oblong-lanceolate, acute and sometimes slightly apiculate at apex, (11-)12-15(-16) mm long, 2.5-4.5(-5) mm wide, margins fused basally for about one-fourth petal length, glandular-puberulent on both faces and margins. Stamens about equaling to slightly longer than calyx, basally epipetalous for 1-3 mm, with filaments greenish yellow and anthers oblong, 0.8-1.4 mm long, 0.8 mm wide, 0.3 mm thick, rounded apically and truncate basally, tawny, yellow or reddish-brown. Pollen 29-34 microns diameter. Nectar scales white or translucent, narrowly reniform, nectaries 0.4-0.6 mm long, 1.1-1.9 mm wide. Carpels erect, glandular-papillate, 6-10 mm long, with short stout styles to 2 mm long and stigmas ca 0.5 mm diameter. Follicles 9-11 mm long. Seeds many, oblong-pyriform, finely striate, yellow-brown to brown, 1-1.3(-1.9) mm long (total length), the body 0.9-1(-1.6) mm long, 0.3-0.5(-0.7) mm wide. 2n = 30 (Clausen 1942, Abrams 1944, Peck 1961, Denton 1982, Meinke 1982, Flora of North America Editorial Committee 2009).
Diagnostic Characteristics: Can be distinguished from other related Sedum species by its (1) inflorescence and upper part of stem glandular pubescent (vs. inflorescence and upper part of stem glabrous or glaucous, eglandular); (2) inflorescence a simple 2-3-parted cyme (vs. inflorescence corymbose or paniculate or with many branches); (3) inflorescence strongly reflexed before flowering time (vs. inflorescence usually erect before flowering time); (4) plants usually 28-33 cm tall (vs. plants up to 28 cm tall); (5) leaves of rosettes glandular-ciliate (vs. leaves of rosettes usually not ciliate); (6) petals 11-13(-16) mm long (vs. petals 4-12 mm long); (7) petals lemon-yellow to greenish-yellow (vs. petals yellow, white, red or pink); and (8) stigmas 0.5 mm in diameter well differentiated from the styles (vs. stigmas up to 0.2 mm in diameter) (Clausen 1942, Denton 1982). Other general distinguishing features include stems often reddish to purplish, leaves mostly a dense basal rosette, plants usually forming few offsets, and larger cauline leaves and longer sepals and petals than related Sedum species. Sedum moranii is most similar to S. albomarginatum, from which it differs by its smaller leaves without white margins in the primary rosette, longer and deeper yellow petals, and glandular-pubescent cymes (Meinke 1982, Oregon Flora Project 2007).
Reproduction Comments: S. moranii exhibits little vegetative reproduction and high levels of self-compatibility. Self-compatibility appears to be adaptive in the hot, short growing season characteristic its habitat, and it is possible that high self-compatibility may have initially facilitated the colonization of lower elevations in the Klamath Mountains (Denton 1979). The abundant glandular hairs of S. moranii are also likely an adaptation to moisture stress (Denton 1979).
Terrestrial Habitat(s): Barrens, Cliff, Grassland/herbaceous, Savanna, Shrubland/chaparral
Habitat Comments: Dry, steep rock outcrops, cliffs, and canyon walls, usually serpentine, sometimes metasedimentary rock. Occupied sites tend to be open with full exposure to sun and are located within plant communities such as conifer (e.g., Pinus jeffreyi) woodlands. Associated species include Pacific madrone (Arbutus menziesii), Wallace's selaginella (Selaginella wallacei), poison oak (Toxicodendron diversilobum), gold-fern (Pityrogramma triangularis ssp. triangularis), yarrow (Achillea millefolium), mountain monardella (Monardella odoratissima), canyon live oak (Quercus chrysolepis), Oregon white oak (Quercus garryana), bear brush (Garrya fremontii), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), silverback luina (Luina hypoleuca), other Sedum species, and several mosses. 100-830 m.
Economic Attributes Not yet assessed
Help
Management Summary
Help
Stewardship Overview: The construction of additional trails or roads within the range of this species should be avoided (Meinke 1982). Education regarding the protection of wildflowers may help to ameliorate impacts from increased recreational use (BLM 2000).
Population/Occurrence Delineation Not yet assessed
Help
Population/Occurrence Viability
Help
U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
Help
Authors/Contributors
Help
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Edition Date: 20Aug2012
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Author: Maybury, K. & S. Vrilakas, rev. A. Olivero (2003), rev. K. Gravuer (2010), rev. L. Wise (2013)
Management Information Edition Date: 06Sep2010
Management Information Edition Author: Gravuer, K.

Botanical data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs), The North Carolina Botanical Garden, and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References
Help
  • Abrams, L. 1944. Illustrated flora of the Pacific states: Washington, Oregon, and California. Vol. 2. Polygonaceae to Krameriaceae. Stanford Univ. Press, Stanford, California. 635 pp.

  • Clausen, R. T. 1942. Studies in the Crassulaceae-III. Sedum, Subgenus Gormania, Section Eugormania. Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 69(1): 27-40.

  • Denton, M. F. 1979. Cytological and Reproductive Differentiation in Sedum Section Gormania (Crassulaceae). Brittonia 31(2): 197-211.

  • Denton, M. F. 1982. Revision of Sedum Section Gormania (Crassulaceae). Brittonia 34(1): 48-77.

  • Flora of North America Editorial Committee. 2009. Flora of North America North of Mexico. Vol. 8. Magnoliophyta: Paeoniaceae to Ericaceae. Oxford University Press, New York. xxiv + 585 pp.

  • Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.

  • Kartesz, J.T. 1999. A synonymized checklist and atlas with biological attributes for the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. First edition. In: Kartesz, J.T., and C.A. Meacham. Synthesis of the North American Flora, Version 1.0. North Carolina Botanical Garden, Chapel Hill, N.C.

  • Meinke, R.J. 1982. Threatened and Endangered Vascular Plants of Oregon: An Illustrated Guide. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 1, Portland, Oregon. 326 pp.

  • Meinke, R.J. 1982. Threatened and endangered vascular plants of Oregon: an illustrated guide. Office of Endangered Species, Region 1, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Portland, OR. 352 pp.

  • Oregon Flora Project. 2007 last update. Rare Plant Guide. Online. Available: http://www.oregonflora.org/rareplants/index.php (Accessed 2008).

  • Peck, M.E. 1961. A manual of the higher plants of Oregon. 2nd edition. Binsford & Mort, Portland, Oregon. 936 pp.

  • U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management (BLM). 2000. Wild Rogue - South Watershed Analysis. REO Fifth Field Watershed #1710031004. Rogue River/Kelsey Creek (Portion South of the Rogue River). Medford District, Grants Pass Resource Area. March 2000. Online. Available: (Accessed 2010).

Use Guidelines & Citation

Use Guidelines and Citation

The Small Print: Trademark, Copyright, Citation Guidelines, Restrictions on Use, and Information Disclaimer.

Note: All species and ecological community data presented in NatureServe Explorer at http://explorer.natureserve.org were updated to be current with NatureServe's central databases as of March 2018.
Note: This report was printed on

Trademark Notice: "NatureServe", NatureServe Explorer, The NatureServe logo, and all other names of NatureServe programs referenced herein are trademarks of NatureServe. Any other product or company names mentioned herein are the trademarks of their respective owners.

Copyright Notice: Copyright © 2018 NatureServe, 4600 N. Fairfax Dr., 7th Floor, Arlington Virginia 22203, U.S.A. All Rights Reserved. Each document delivered from this server or web site may contain other proprietary notices and copyright information relating to that document. The following citation should be used in any published materials which reference the web site.

Citation for data on website including State Distribution, Watershed, and Reptile Range maps:
NatureServe. 2018. NatureServe Explorer: An online encyclopedia of life [web application]. Version 7.1. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia. Available http://explorer.natureserve.org. (Accessed:

Citation for Bird Range Maps of North America:
Ridgely, R.S., T.F. Allnutt, T. Brooks, D.K. McNicol, D.W. Mehlman, B.E. Young, and J.R. Zook. 2003. Digital Distribution Maps of the Birds of the Western Hemisphere, version 1.0. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Acknowledgement Statement for Bird Range Maps of North America:
"Data provided by NatureServe in collaboration with Robert Ridgely, James Zook, The Nature Conservancy - Migratory Bird Program, Conservation International - CABS, World Wildlife Fund - US, and Environment Canada - WILDSPACE."

Citation for Mammal Range Maps of North America:
Patterson, B.D., G. Ceballos, W. Sechrest, M.F. Tognelli, T. Brooks, L. Luna, P. Ortega, I. Salazar, and B.E. Young. 2003. Digital Distribution Maps of the Mammals of the Western Hemisphere, version 1.0. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Acknowledgement Statement for Mammal Range Maps of North America:
"Data provided by NatureServe in collaboration with Bruce Patterson, Wes Sechrest, Marcelo Tognelli, Gerardo Ceballos, The Nature Conservancy-Migratory Bird Program, Conservation International-CABS, World Wildlife Fund-US, and Environment Canada-WILDSPACE."

Citation for Amphibian Range Maps of the Western Hemisphere:
IUCN, Conservation International, and NatureServe. 2004. Global Amphibian Assessment. IUCN, Conservation International, and NatureServe, Washington, DC and Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Acknowledgement Statement for Amphibian Range Maps of the Western Hemisphere:
"Data developed as part of the Global Amphibian Assessment and provided by IUCN-World Conservation Union, Conservation International and NatureServe."

NOTE: Full metadata for the Bird Range Maps of North America is available at:
http://www.natureserve.org/library/birdDistributionmapsmetadatav1.pdf.

Full metadata for the Mammal Range Maps of North America is available at:
http://www.natureserve.org/library/mammalsDistributionmetadatav1.pdf.

Restrictions on Use: Permission to use, copy and distribute documents delivered from this server is hereby granted under the following conditions:
  1. The above copyright notice must appear in all copies;
  2. Any use of the documents available from this server must be for informational purposes only and in no instance for commercial purposes;
  3. Some data may be downloaded to files and altered in format for analytical purposes, however the data should still be referenced using the citation above;
  4. No graphics available from this server can be used, copied or distributed separate from the accompanying text. Any rights not expressly granted herein are reserved by NatureServe. Nothing contained herein shall be construed as conferring by implication, estoppel, or otherwise any license or right under any trademark of NatureServe. No trademark owned by NatureServe may be used in advertising or promotion pertaining to the distribution of documents delivered from this server without specific advance permission from NatureServe. Except as expressly provided above, nothing contained herein shall be construed as conferring any license or right under any NatureServe copyright.
Information Warranty Disclaimer: All documents and related graphics provided by this server and any other documents which are referenced by or linked to this server are provided "as is" without warranty as to the currentness, completeness, or accuracy of any specific data. NatureServe hereby disclaims all warranties and conditions with regard to any documents provided by this server or any other documents which are referenced by or linked to this server, including but not limited to all implied warranties and conditions of merchantibility, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement. NatureServe makes no representations about the suitability of the information delivered from this server or any other documents that are referenced to or linked to this server. In no event shall NatureServe be liable for any special, indirect, incidental, consequential damages, or for damages of any kind arising out of or in connection with the use or performance of information contained in any documents provided by this server or in any other documents which are referenced by or linked to this server, under any theory of liability used. NatureServe may update or make changes to the documents provided by this server at any time without notice; however, NatureServe makes no commitment to update the information contained herein. Since the data in the central databases are continually being updated, it is advisable to refresh data retrieved at least once a year after its receipt. The data provided is for planning, assessment, and informational purposes. Site specific projects or activities should be reviewed for potential environmental impacts with appropriate regulatory agencies. If ground-disturbing activities are proposed on a site, the appropriate state natural heritage program(s) or conservation data center can be contacted for a site-specific review of the project area (see Visit Local Programs).

Feedback Request: NatureServe encourages users to let us know of any errors or significant omissions that you find in the data through (see Contact Us). Your comments will be very valuable in improving the overall quality of our databases for the benefit of all users.