Schoenocrambe barnebyi - (Welsh & Atwood) Rollins
Syes Butte Plains-mustard
Other English Common Names: Barneby Reed-Mustard
Other Common Names: Syes Butte plainsmustard
Taxonomic Status: Accepted
Related ITIS Name(s): Schoenocrambe barnebyi (Welsh & Atwood) Rollins (TSN 195790)
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.131256
Element Code: PDBRA28020
Informal Taxonomy: Plants, Vascular - Flowering Plants - Mustard Family
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Plantae Anthophyta Dicotyledoneae Capparales Brassicaceae Schoenocrambe
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Concept Reference
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Concept Reference: Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.
Concept Reference Code: B94KAR01HQUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Schoenocrambe barnebyi
Conservation Status
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NatureServe Status

Global Status: G1
Global Status Last Reviewed: 09Apr2009
Global Status Last Changed: 30Jun1988
Rounded Global Status: G1 - Critically Imperiled
Reasons: Endemic to the Canyonlands of south-central Utah, where known from five occurrences in two distinct clusters: one in the southern portion of the San Rafael Swell in southern Emery County (administered by the BLM) and the other in Capitol Reef National Park in central Wayne County. Approximately 3,000 plants are known, but this may be an underestimate since this species occurs on difficult terrain. The Emery County occurrences are threatened by habitat degradation associated with uranium mining claim annual assessment work (an access road bisects the population); degradation could become more severe in the future if abandoned uranium mines near these occurrences were ever reopened. The Wayne County occurrences are vulnerable to trampling by hikers.
Nation: United States
National Status: N1

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
United States Utah (S1)

Other Statuses

U.S. Endangered Species Act (USESA): LE: Listed endangered (14Jan1992)
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Lead Region: R6 - Rocky Mountain

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent Comments: Endemic to the Canyonlands of south-central Utah, where known from two distinct clusters of occurrences: one in the southern portion of the San Rafael Swell near Muddy Creek in southern Emery County and the other in Capitol Reef National Park in the Fremont River drainage west of Fruita in central Wayne County.

Number of Occurrences: 1 - 5
Number of Occurrences Comments: Five occurrences in two clusters ("populations") are known. However, additional potential habitat in the vicinity of each of these clustes remains unsurveyed (Franklin 2005).

Population Size Comments: Approximately 3,000 plants are known, but this may be an underestimate since this species occurs on to terrain that is difficult to navigate and in some cases inaccessible (Franklin 2005).

Overall Threat Impact: Medium
Overall Threat Impact Comments: The Emery County occurrences are threatened by habitat damage associated with potential uranium mining. An access road leading to nearby mining claims bisects the hillside where many plants occur, and there is concern that the annual assessment work required to maintain these claims may cause some habitat degradation. Abandoned uranium mines are also present near these occurrences; should mining ever resume at those locations, additional impacts are possible. The Wayne County occurrences are vulnerable to trampling by hikers in Capitol Reef National Park. Domestic livestock grazing may have had an impact on this species historically, but is not believed to be a significant threat currently due to grazing management by the Federal agencies (USFWS 1994).

Long-term Trend:  
Long-term Trend Comments: Little information is available on the historic abundance of S. barnebyi because it was discovered relatively recently (1980). Past activities associated with uranium mining during the 1950s and 1960s may have extirpated a portion of the Emery County population, but this cannot be known for certain (USFWS 1994).

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
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Global Range: Endemic to the Canyonlands of south-central Utah, where known from two distinct clusters of occurrences: one in the southern portion of the San Rafael Swell near Muddy Creek in southern Emery County and the other in Capitol Reef National Park in the Fremont River drainage west of Fruita in central Wayne County.

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
Color legend for Distribution Map

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States UT

Range Map
No map available.


U.S. Distribution by County Help
State County Name (FIPS Code)
UT Emery (49015), Wayne (49055)
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
U.S. Distribution by Watershed Help
Watershed Region Help Watershed Name (Watershed Code)
14 Muddy (14070002)+, Fremont (14070003)+
+ Natural heritage record(s) exist for this watershed
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
Ecology & Life History
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Basic Description: A sparsely leaved perennial herb, 1-3.5 dm tall. Flowers (May-June) have pale purple petals, prominently veined with darker purple.
Diagnostic Characteristics: Similar to S. argillacea, but differs in being larger in all its parts, having elliptic to oblanceolate leaves, and having fewer flowers per raceme (Utah Native Plant Society 2008).
Duration: PERENNIAL
Terrestrial Habitat(s): Bare rock/talus/scree, Desert
Habitat Comments: Mixed desert shrub communities (shadscale, Eriogonum, Ephedra), in sparsely vegetated sites on steep, eroding north to northeast facing slopes. Grows in xeric, fine-textured red clay soils rich in selenium and gypsum of the Moenkopi Formation, and, rarely, on soils eroded from it that now overlie the Chinle Formation and on the Carmel Formation. Associated species include Abronia fragrans, Amelanchier utahensis, Artemisia dracunculus, Astragalus brandegeei, Atriplex confertifolia, Chrysothamnus nauseosus, Ephedra torreyana, Ephedra viridis, Eriogonum corymbosum, Erioneuron pulchellum, Erioneuron pilosum, Hilaria jamesii, Monolepis nuttalliana, Opuntia polyacantha, Phacelia rafaelensis, Sporobolus sp., Stanleya pinnata, and Townsendia incana. 1460-1985 m.
Economic Attributes Not yet assessed
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Management Summary Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Delineation Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Viability
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U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
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Authors/Contributors
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NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Edition Date: 30Dec1987
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Author: Roth, E., rev. B. Franklin (1996), rev. K. Gravuer (2009)

Botanical data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs), The North Carolina Botanical Garden, and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References
Help
  • 100th Congress. 1988. Endangered Species Act of 1973, appropriations authorization for fiscal years 1988-1992. Public Law 100-478-October 7, 1988 102 STAT.2307-102 STAT.2323.

  • Anderson, K. 1992. Report on the Awapa Plateau['s] threatened, endangered and sensitive plants. Submitted to [USDI] Bureau of Land Management[, Richfield District Office, Richfield, UT]. 9 pp. + maps.

  • England, J.L. 1994. Utah reed-mustards: clay reed-mustard (Schoenocrambe argillacea), Barneby reed-mustard (Schoenocrambe barnebyi), shrubby reed-mustard (Schoenocrambe suffrutescens) recovery plan. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Denver, Colorado. 22 pp.

  • Franklin, M.A. 2005. Plant information compiled by the Utah Natural Heritage Program: A progress report. Publication Number 05-40. Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, Salt Lake City, Utah. 341 pp. [http://dwrcdc.nr.utah.gov/ucdc/ViewReports/plantrpt.htm]

  • Heil, K. 1994. The effects of grazing on threatened/ endangered plant species in The Hartnet and Sandy III grazing allotments, Capitol Reef National Park, Utah. Conducted for: National Park Service. Unpublished report. San Juan College, Farmington, New Mexico. 45 pp. + maps.

  • Heil, K. D. 1987. A vegetation study of Capitol Reef National Park, conducted for the National Park Service. Final progress report for 1986. San Juan College, Farmington, New Mexico. 9 pp.

  • Heil, K. D., J. M. Porter, R. Fleming, and W. H. Romme. 1993. Vascular flora and vegetation of Capitol Reef National Park. Technical report NPS/NAUCARE/NRTR-93/01. 82 pp.

  • Heil, K.D. 1992. Survey to determine the distribution of: Schoenocrambe barnebyi on Bureau of Land Management lands in Utah. Conducted for: Bureau of Land Management, Moab, Utah. Prepared by: Ecosphere Environmental Services, Farmington, New Mexico. 7 pp + appendices.

  • Holmgren, N.H., P.K. Holmgren, and A. Cronquist. 2005. Intermountain flora. Volume 2, part B. Subclass Dilleniidae. The New York Botanical Garden Press. 488 pages.

  • Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.

  • Kass, R. J. 1990. Final report of habitat inventory of threatened, endangered and candidate plant species in the San Rafael Swell, Utah. Environmental Consulting, Springville, Utah. 87 pp.

  • Neese, E. 1986. Literature search report (preliminary report for Habitat Inverntory of Sclerocactus wrightiae and other associated sensitive species.

  • Neese, E. 1987. Final report. Habitat inventory of Sclerocactus wrightiae and other associated sensitive species. Volume I - Text and photographs. Prepared for: [USDI] Bureau of Land Management, Richfield District Office. Neese Investigations, Salt Lake City, Utah. ??? pp.

  • Rollins, R.C. 1982. Thelypodiopsis and Schoenocrambe (Cruciferae). Contr. Gray Herb. 212: 71-102. (!!!Very poor copy)

  • Rollins, R.C. 1993a. The Cruciferae of continental North America: Systematics of the mustard family from the Arctic to Panama. Stanford Univ. Press, Stanford, California. 976 pp.

  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). 1992. Endangered and threatened wildlife and plants; proposed endangered status for the plant SALIX ARIZONICA (Arizona willow), with critical habitat. Federal Register 57(225):54747-54765.

  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). 1992. Final rule to determine the plant Schoenocrambe argillaceae (clay reed-mustard) to be a threatened species and the plant Schoenocrambe barnebyi (Barneby reed-mustard) to be an endangered species. Federal Register 57(9): 1398-1403.

  • Utah Native Plant Society. 2003-2008. Utah Rare Plant Guide. Salt Lake City, UT: Utah Rare Plant Guide Home Page. Online. Available: http://www.utahrareplants.org (accessed 2009).

  • Welsh, S. L. 1981. New taxa of western plants-in tribute. Brittonia 33(3): 294-303.

  • Welsh, S. L. 1983. Collection data - rare plants of Utah. Prepared by Endangered Plant Studies, Inc. 129 North 1000 East, Orem, UT 84057. Report from Larry England, US Fish and Wildlife Service, T & E Species.

  • Welsh, S.L., N.D. Atwood, S. Goodrich and L.C. Higgins. (Eds.) 2008. A Utah Flora. 4th edition, revised. Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, U.S.A. 1019 pp.

  • Welsh, S.L., N.D. Atwood, S. Goodrich, and L.C. Higgins (eds.) 1993. A Utah flora. 2nd edition. Brigham Young Univ., Provo, Utah. 986 pp.

  • Wosten, Mireille. 1997. The San Rafael Swell; the impact of off-road vehicle use. Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance. Salt Lake City, Utah.

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