Schinia bicuspida - Smith, 1891
a noctuid moth
Taxonomic Status: Accepted
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.108901
Element Code: IILEYMP400
Informal Taxonomy: Animals, Invertebrates - Insects - Butterflies and Moths - Other Moths
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Animalia Mandibulata Insecta Lepidoptera Noctuidae Schinia
Genus Size: D - Medium to large genus (21+ species)
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Concept Reference
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Concept Reference: Hodges, R.W. et al., eds. 1983. Check List of the Lepidoptera of America North of Mexico. E.W. Classey Limited and The Wedge Entomological Research Foundation, London. 284 pp.
Concept Reference Code: B83HOD01HQUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Schinia bicuspida
Conservation Status
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NatureServe Status

Global Status: GNR
Rounded Global Status: GNR - Not Yet Ranked
Nation: United States
National Status: NNR

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
United States Arkansas (SNR)

Other Statuses

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
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U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.

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Distribution data for U.S. states and Canadian provinces is known to be incomplete or has not been reviewed for this taxon.

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States AR

Range Map
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Ecology & Life History Not yet assessed
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Economic Attributes Not yet assessed
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Management Summary Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Delineation
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Group Name: Schinia and other flower-feeding Noctuidae

Use Class: Not applicable
Minimum Criteria for an Occurrence: A patch or proximate patches of the foodplant where the species occurs or has occurred where there is potential for persistence or regular recurrence. Minimally a collection or photograph of an adult or verifiable larvae in association with the foodplant. If the foodplant is not known for the species an occurrence may be based on an adult associated with plausible habitat, that is with some sort of flowery situation such as a grassland, roadside, outcrop etc. Verification standards vary with taxa, but for many SCHNIA and some others photographs of adults are acceptable although specimens are always preferable. In most cases high quality occurrences will be metapopulations with several large patches of the foodplant with some scattered individuals between the main patches, usually within in a large prairie, savanna, woodland etc.
Mapping Guidance: When the foodplant occurs in multiple patches within a large remnant prairie, savanna, woodland, right of way etc. consider all occupied patches as a single metapopulation occurrence subject to the 10 kilometer distance.
Separation Distance for Unsuitable Habitat: 2 km
Separation Distance for Suitable Habitat: 10 km
Separation Justification: Most of these species are strong fliers and good colonizers. For example SCHINIA NUBILA colonized and became established in much of southern New Jersey and parts of Maryland, New York and Pennsylvania during the early and mid 1990s. Many species are very adept at colonizing successional habitats or coping with plants that do not flower every year. They also often reach high densities and can colonize small patches of plants if there are other source patches in the area. Thus a population should occupy essentially all available habitat where the species is present at all and populations will usually occur widely in good habitats although areas of concentration will shift if the plants bloom irregularly. While strays do occur adults concentrate very near their larval foodplant so relatively short separation distances across unsuitable habitat can be used to define occurrences even though some gene flow may occur. While some seemingly suitable habitat may be unoccupied for some of the rarer species, in general collections less than 10 kilometers apart over suitable habitat with the foodplant are very unlikely to represent separate occurrences.
Inferred Minimum Extent of Habitat Use (when actual extent is unknown): 1 km
Inferred Minimum Extent Justification: In general habitats are only a few hectares to hundreds of hectares and so IE is simply all available habitat up to 400 hectares. However some arbitrary cap is needed where habitat is extensive or foodplant patches are widely distributed within a large community.
Date: 30Oct2001
Author: Schweitzer, Dale F.
Population/Occurrence Viability
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U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
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Authors/Contributors
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References
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  • Hodges, R.W. et al., eds. 1983. Check List of the Lepidoptera of America North of Mexico. E.W. Classey Limited and The Wedge Entomological Research Foundation, London. 284 pp.

  • Lafontaine, J.D. and B. C. Schmidt. 2010. Annotated check list of the Noctuoidea (Insecta, Lepidoptera) of North America north of Mexico. ZooKeys 40:1-239.

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