Potamogeton ogdenii - Hellquist & Hilton
Ogden's Pondweed
Other Common Names: Ogden's pondweed
Synonym(s): Potamogeton x ogdenii Hellquist & R.L. Hilton
Taxonomic Status: Accepted
Related ITIS Name(s): Potamogeton ogdenii Hellquist & Hilton (TSN 504554)
French Common Names: potamot d'Ogden
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.151664
Element Code: PMPOT03170
Informal Taxonomy: Plants, Vascular - Flowering Plants - Pondweed Family
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Plantae Anthophyta Monocotyledoneae Najadales Potamogetonaceae Potamogeton
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Concept Reference
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Concept Reference: Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.
Concept Reference Code: B94KAR01HQUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Potamogeton ogdenii
Taxonomic Comments: Hellquist (2003) considers to be a fertile species of hybrid origin, according to NYHP. Fed. Reg. (USFWS) considers a '3B' (30Sep93). Also treated as a hybrid by Kaplan et al. (2013).
Conservation Status
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NatureServe Status

Global Status: G1G2
Global Status Last Reviewed: 29Sep2005
Global Status Last Changed: 29Sep2005
Rounded Global Status: G1 - Critically Imperiled
Reasons: Known only from about 10 occurrences in western New England and adjacent New York, but it is suspected that it is uncollected and under-observed.. Reported from Ontario, Canada based on a single collection made in 1974 (FNA 2000; Ontario Natural Heritage Information Centre 2003). The small likelihood of both parent species being present in good alkaline water habitats has probably limited its distribution.

Expected to be overlooked given the difficulties of identifying and similarities to other Potamogetons.

This species is threatened by eutrophication, and recreational actitivties such as boating.

Nation: United States
National Status: N1
Nation: Canada
National Status: NH (13Aug2012)

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
United States Connecticut (S1), Massachusetts (S1), New York (S1), Vermont (S1)
Canada Ontario (SH)

Other Statuses

Canadian Species at Risk Act (SARA) Schedule 1/Annexe 1 Status: E (05Mar2009)
Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC): Endangered (22Apr2007)
Comments on COSEWIC: Reason for designation: This species is an aquatic plant that is globally at risk with low population numbers and only 11 extant sites known worldwide. In Canada, it is known from only 3 sites in southeastern Ontario where it was last collected in 1987. Recent fieldwork has documented the loss of habitat and probable extirpation of one population but failed to relocate the others ? one of these is a historic site in a relatively undisturbed region with no specific locality information. The presence of aquatic invasive plants in areas around presumed extant populations suggests a further decline in overall area and quality of habitat for native pondweeds.  However the species, which is easily confused in the field with other similar narrow-leaved pondweeds, may still be present in Canada in suitable habitats in the vicinity of previously known sites.

Status history: Designated Endangered in April 2007. 

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent Comments: Very limited distribution. Only known from Massachusetts, Vermont, New York and Ontario.

Area of Occupancy: 3-125 4-km2 grid cells
Area of Occupancy Comments:  

Number of Occurrences: 6 - 20
Number of Occurrences Comments: NY (3), MA (2), ON (3) only one is confirmed extant and VT (1) one other occurrence has not been seen in many years.

Population Size Comments: Population numbers of this aquatic plant vary greatly from year to year (Hellquist and Mertinooke-Jongkind 2002). Number of individuals is not a good indication of population size, rather areal coverage is a better indicators of population size.

Number of Occurrences with Good Viability/Integrity: Very few to few (1-12)
Viability/Integrity Comments: At least some of the 10 extant occurrences are of good viability.

Overall Threat Impact: High
Overall Threat Impact Comments: Eutrophication due to runoff from nearby farms, herbicides used to control aquatic vegetation, lawns and paved area pose a major threat. The eutrophication allows algae and weeds to thrive which can crowd the pondweed. Further, eutrophication from goose droppings may be a threat in the future (Hellquist and Mertinook-Jongkind 2003) Competition from invasive species is also a threat, and specifically Myriophyllum spicatum and Trapa natans. These non-natives species present a threat to the pondweed because they can shade and outcompete this vulnerable species.

In Vermont this species is threatened by eutrophication and water level changes due to a nearby dam break.

In New York this species is potentially threatened by recreational boating. There is one population in New York which is mildly threatened by acidification by the surrounding bogmat. This pondweed requires alkaline water chemistry so the acidic bog mat alters the water pH (Hellquist and Mertinook-Jongkind 2003).

In Ontario, this species is in or very close to a lock system.

Short-term Trend: Unknown
Short-term Trend Comments: Possibly a newly evolved species and trends are not known.

Intrinsic Vulnerability Comments: Small populations make this taxon intrisically vulnerable. Since this species is a fertile hybrid between P. hillii and P. zosteriformis, with the former being rare, it's rarity could be attributed to the limited distribution of P. hillii (Hellquist and Mertinooke-Jongkind 2003).

Environmental Specificity: Narrow. Specialist or community with key requirements common.
Environmental Specificity Comments: Seems to prefer alkaline waters; stagnant waters in ditches and slow moving streams. This species is restricted by its habitat.

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
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Global Range: Very limited distribution. Only known from Massachusetts, Vermont, New York and Ontario.

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
Color legend for Distribution Map

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States CT, MA, NY, VT
Canada ON

Range Map
No map available.


U.S. Distribution by County Help
State County Name (FIPS Code)
CT Litchfield (09005)
MA Berkshire (25003)
VT Rutland (50021), Washington (50023), Windsor (50027)
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
U.S. Distribution by Watershed Help
Watershed Region Help Watershed Name (Watershed Code)
01 Black-Ottauquechee (01080106)+, Housatonic (01100005)+
02 Hudson-Hoosic (02020003)+, Middle Hudson (02020006)+
04 Mettawee River (04150401)+, Winooski River (04150403)+
+ Natural heritage record(s) exist for this watershed
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
Ecology & Life History
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Basic Description: An aquatic annual herb; the slender, branching stem and linear leaves (5-10 cm x 1-3 mm) are all submersed. Flowers are inconspicuous, borne on a small fleshy, cylindrical spike. Winter bud characters differentiate this species from its close relatives. This is a fertile species that arose from hybridization of P. hillii and P. zosteriformis. This species reproduces mainly be producing turions (winter buds) (Hellquist and Mertinooke-Jongkind 2002).
General Description: This is an aquatic plant with masses of long, very narrow leaves visible just below the surface of waters with a high pH. There are 3, sometimes 5 veins running the length of the leaf. There are one or two rows of large open cells on either side of the mid vein and often, but not always, a little bristle at the tip of the leaf. It is often in fruit with small clusters of fruits at the end of short arching stalks. The fruits are large for a pondweed .
Technical Description: This pondweed has a stem that is round or only slightly flattened. All leaves are submersed and 1-3 mm broad with 5-11(3-13) veined. The peduncles are mostly terminal. Winter buds are uncommon but when present these are stiff with the outer flat leaves ascending or with inner and outer leaves occasionally undifferentiated. The stipules are brown (rarely white) and fibrous only at tips. There are 2-4 (0-6) lacunae bands per leaf.
Reproduction Comments: This annual species reproduces by turions (winter buds). These winter buds are produced at the tips of stems late in the growing season, these buds then fall to the substrate and remain dormant until spring . This species does produce some viable fruit, however, usually one fruit per plant (Hellquist and Mertinooke-Jongkind 2002).
Riverine Habitat(s): Low gradient
Lacustrine Habitat(s): Shallow water
Palustrine Habitat(s): HERBACEOUS WETLAND
Habitat Comments: Ponds, lakes, marshes, and slow streams with alkaline waters.
Economic Attributes Not yet assessed
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Management Summary Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Delineation Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Viability
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Excellent Viability: Size: Population consisting of greater than 1,000 ramets and/or habitat area occupied greater than 5 acres (2 hectares). Because population sizes of pusilloid pondweeds, such as P. ogdenii, fluctuate, size and/or area of habitat occupied should be averaged over five surveys.
Condition: Very vigorous population, exhibiting rooted, dark-green foliage, reproducing abundantly via winter buds, with some to many individuals producing fruit. Immediate plant community associates indigenous to northeastern North America; EO not competing directly with exotics.
Landscape context: Supporting waterbody is natural (expected to persist, not subject to drastic alterations in water level) and large (100 acres (40 hectares) or greater) and with extensive available habitat. Invasive aquatic species such as Myriophyllum heterophyllum, M. spicatum, Trapa natans, and Potamogeton crispus are either absent from the waterbody, being actively managed in a manner that is sensitive to P. ogdenii (e.g. not a broad-spectrum herbicide or whole-lake drawdown), or are present at sufficiently low levels as to not pose a significant competitive threat to the persistence of the occurrence. Aquatic habitat well-buffered from high-nutrient runoff which could lead to excessive eutrophication.

Good Viability: Size: Population consisting of between 500 and 999 ramets and/or habitat area occupied greater than 1 acre (0.40 hectares), averaged over five surveys.
Condition: Vigorous population, exhibiting rooted, dark-green foliage, not necessarily producing fruit. Immediate plant community associates indigenous or not, EO may be competing directly with exotics (exotics within the EO area).

Landscape Context: Supporting waterbody of moderate size (40 acres (16 hectares) or greater) with much available habitat. Invasive aquatic species may be present, but not dominant or co-dominant, in the waterbody. Aquatic habitat partially buffered from high-nutrient runoff.

Fair Viability: Size: Population size between 25 and 499 ramets and/or habitat area occupied less than 1 acre (0.40 hectares), averaged over five surveys.
Condition: Population of at least fair vigor. Plants with paler foliage, not reproducing abundantly, some plants fragmented.
Landscape Context: Small supporting waterbody with limited potential habitat area (less than 40 acres (16 hectares)) or a larger pond with invasive species dominant or co-dominant, or with a high potential vulnerability for degraded water quality (such as excessive lawn areas extending down to shore, old/numerous septic systems in the vicinity of the waterfront, known large geese population, etc). Management may be necessary/recommended.


Poor Viability: Size: Fewer than 25 ramets ever documented.
Condition: Population of poor vigor.
Landscape context: Supporting waterbody very small or degraded, or both.

Justification: Population sizes of pusilloid pondweeds are known to fluctuate widely from year to year. Therefore, size/area of habitat occupied should be averaged over five surveys. Because numbers of ramets are difficult to census, broad estimates of population size are acceptable and expected, unless population size is quite small (and then is easily assessed). A very large, stable population with thousands of ramets covering 30 acres of habitat has been documented. According to Hellquist (2003), threats to P. ogdenii include eutrophication and competiton from invasive species.
Key for Ranking Species Element Occurrences Using the Generic Approach (2008).
Date: 13Jan2005
Author: Cullina, Melissa Dow
Notes: Primary Reference:

Hellquist, C.B. and T. Mertinooke-Jongkind. 2003. Ogden's Pondweed (Potamogeton ogdenii) Conservation and Research Plan for New England. New England Wild Flower Society, Framingham, Massachusetts, USA.

U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
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Authors/Contributors
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NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Edition Date: 29Sep2005
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Author: Morse, L.E. (1994); rev. Young, S./Maybury, K. (1996), rev. A. Olivero (2003), T. Weldy and L. Oliver (rev. 2005)
Element Ecology & Life History Edition Date: 15Feb2005
Element Ecology & Life History Author(s): Weldy, T. W.

Botanical data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs), The North Carolina Botanical Garden, and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References
Help
  • COSEWIC 2007. COSEWIC assessment and status report on the Ogden's pondweed Potamogeton ogdenii in Canada. Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. Ottawa. vi + 19 pp. (www.sararegistry.gc.ca/status/status_e.cfm).

  • Crow, Garrett E. and C. Barre Hellquist. 2000. Aquatic and Wetland Plants of Northeastern North America: A revised and enlarged edition of Norman C. Fassett's a Manual of Aquatic Plants. Volume One: Pteridophytes, Gymnosperms, and Angiosperms: Dicotyledons. The University of Wisconsin Press. Madison, Wisconsin. 536 Pages.

  • Flora of North America Editorial Committee (editors). 2000. Flora of North America, North of Mexico. Volume 22. Magnoliophyta: Alismatidae, Arecidae, Commelinidae (in part), and Zingiberidae. Oxford University Press, New York. 352 pp.

  • Flora of North America Editorial Committee. 2000. Flora of North America north of Mexico. Vol. 22. Magnoliophyta: Alismatidae, Arecidae, Commelinidae (in part), and Zingiberidae. Oxford Univ. Press, New York. xxiii + 352 pp.

  • Flora of North America Editorial Committee. 2000. Flora of North America north of Mexico. Vol. 22. Magnoliophyta: Alismatidae, Arecidae, Commelinidae (in part), and Zingiberidae. Oxford Univ. Press, New York. xxiii + 352 pp.

  • Gleason, H.A., and A. Cronquist. 1991. Manual of vascular plants of northeastern United States and adjacent Canada. New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, New York. 910 pp.

  • Gleason, Henry A. and A. Cronquist. 1991. Manual of Vascular Plants of Northeastern United States and Adjacent Canada. The New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, New York. 910 pp.

  • Hellquist, C.B. and T. Mertinooke-Jongkind. 2003. Ogden's Pondweed (Potamogeton ogdenii) Conservation and Research Plan for New England. New England Wild Flower Society, Framingham, Massachusetts, USA.

  • Hellquist, C.B. and T. Mertinooke-Jongkind. 2003. Ogden's Pondweed (Potamogeton ogdenii) Conservation and Research Plan for New England. New England Wild Flower Society, Framingham, Massachusetts, USA. Available at http://www.newfs.org/conserve/pdf/Potamogetonogdenii.pdf. 16 pp.

  • Hellquist, C.B., and R.L. Hilton. 1983. A new species of Potamogeton (Potamogetonaceae) from northeastern U.S. Systematic Botany 8(1): 86-92.

  • Hellquist, C.B., and R.L. Hilton. 1983. A new species of Potamogeton (Potamogetonaceae) from northeastern U.S. Systematic Botany 8(1): 86-92.

  • Hellquist, C.B., and R.L. Hilton. 1983. A new species of Potamogeton (Potamogetonaceae) from northeastern United States. Systematic Botany 8(1):86-92.

  • Holmgren, Noel. 1998. The Illustrated Companion to Gleason and Cronquist's Manual. Illustrations of the Vascular Plants of Northeastern United States and Adjacent Canada. The New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, New York.

  • Kaplan, Z., V. Jarolímová, and J. Fehrer. 2013. Revision of chromosome numbers of Potamogetonaceae: a new basis for taxonomic and evolutionary implications. Preslia 85: 421?482.

  • Kaplan, Z., V. Jarolímová, and J. Fehrer. 2013. Revision of chromosome numbers of Potamogetonaceae: a new basis for taxonomic and evolutionary implications. Preslia 85: 421?482.

  • Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.

  • Mitchell, Richard S. and Gordon C. Tucker. 1997. Revised Checklist of New York State Plants. Contributions to a Flora of New York State. Checklist IV. Bulletin No. 490. New York State Museum. Albany, NY. 400 pp.

  • New York Natural Heritage Program. 2010. Biotics database. New York Natural Heritage Program. New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. Albany, NY.

  • Ontario Natural Heritage Information Centre. 2003. April 3-last update. General Element Report: Potamogeton ogdenii. Online. Available: http://www.mnr.gov.on.ca/MNR/nhic/elements/el_report.cfm?elid=201107. Accessed 2003, June 13.

  • Reschke, Carol. 1990. Ecological communities of New York State. New York Natural Heritage Program, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. Latham, NY. 96 pp. plus xi.

  • Weldy, T. and D. Werier. 2010. New York flora atlas. [S.M. Landry, K.N. Campbell, and L.D. Mabe (original application development), Florida Center for Community Design and Research http://www.fccdr.usf.edu/. University of South Florida http://www.usf.edu/]. New York Flora Association http://wwws.nyflora.org/, Albany, New York

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