Neviusia alabamensis - Gray
Alabama Snow-wreath
Other Common Names: Alabama snow-wreath
Taxonomic Status: Accepted
Related ITIS Name(s): Neviusia alabamensis Gray (TSN 25266)
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.128124
Element Code: PDROS14010
Informal Taxonomy: Plants, Vascular - Flowering Plants - Rose Family
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Plantae Anthophyta Dicotyledoneae Rosales Rosaceae Neviusia
Check this box to expand all report sections:
Concept Reference
Help
Concept Reference: Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.
Concept Reference Code: B94KAR01HQUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Neviusia alabamensis
Taxonomic Comments: Two species in the genus, and these are the only North American members of the tribe Kerrieae of the family Rosaceae. The tribe is an example of an Arcto-Tertiary relic distribution (Fernald, 1931) of the pattern described by Wood (1972) as E Asia - E North America.
Conservation Status
Help

NatureServe Status

Global Status: G2
Global Status Last Reviewed: 16Jul2004
Global Status Last Changed: 18Sep1990
Rounded Global Status: G2 - Imperiled
Reasons: Rare throughout its range, with widely scattered 'populations' that are mostly or entirely clonal. Sexual reproduction does not appear to be occurring at all; little or no seed production has been observed and seedlings have never been found at any of the sites. Although this species has been cultivated far north of its natural range, wild populations may be restricted to some specific habitat condition(s) near the boundary of the Misssissippi Embayment of the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Plain.
Nation: United States
National Status: N2

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
United States Alabama (S2), Arkansas (S1S2), Georgia (S1), Mississippi (S1), Missouri (SH), Tennessee (S2)

Other Statuses

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent Comments: At or near the upland edge of the Mississippi Embayment. Extant populations are known from 16 counties in 5 states: Newton, Pope, Conway, Faulkner Counties, AR; Tishomingo County, MS; Bibb, Blount, Jefferson, Madison, Jackson, Limestone, Tuscaloosa Counties, AL; Rutherford, Lincoln, Moore Counties, TN; and, Walker County, GA. Also reported in South Carolina.

Area of Occupancy: 26-2,500 4-km2 grid cells
Area of Occupancy Comments:  

Number of Occurrences: 21 - 80

Population Size Comments: All consist of continuous clones, so populations may consist of only individual plants. Seedlings have never been observed in natural populations.

Number of Occurrences with Good Viability/Integrity: Some to many (13-125)

Overall Threat Impact: High - medium
Overall Threat Impact Comments: Many sites are potentially threatened. Potential threats include timber harvesting, recreational development, encroachment by undesirable weedy species, grazing, urban expansion, and forest management practices (Southern Appalachian Species Viability Project 2002).

Short-term Trend: Relatively Stable (<=10% change)
Short-term Trend Comments: Believed to be stable.

Intrinsic Vulnerability Comments: No seedlings found; moisture stress in drought years; displacement by aggressive woody species; specific germinating conditions.

Environmental Specificity: Narrow to moderate.

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
Help
Global Range: At or near the upland edge of the Mississippi Embayment. Extant populations are known from 16 counties in 5 states: Newton, Pope, Conway, Faulkner Counties, AR; Tishomingo County, MS; Bibb, Blount, Jefferson, Madison, Jackson, Limestone, Tuscaloosa Counties, AL; Rutherford, Lincoln, Moore Counties, TN; and, Walker County, GA. Also reported in South Carolina.

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
Color legend for Distribution Map

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States AL, AR, GA, MO, MS, TN

Range Map
No map available.


U.S. Distribution by County Help
State County Name (FIPS Code)
AL Bibb (01007), Blount (01009), Jackson (01071), Jefferson (01073), Limestone (01083), Madison (01089), Marshall (01095), Tuscaloosa (01125)
AR Conway (05029), Faulkner (05045), Marion (05089), Newton (05101), Pope (05115), Searcy (05129)
GA Floyd (13115), Walker (13295)
MO Butler (29023)*
MS Tishomingo (28141)
TN Franklin (47051), Lincoln (47103), Meigs (47121), Monroe (47123), Moore (47127), Rutherford (47149)
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
U.S. Distribution by Watershed Help
Watershed Region Help Watershed Name (Watershed Code)
03 Etowah (03150104)+, Upper Coosa (03150105)+, Cahaba (03150202)+, Mulberry (03160109)+, Locust (03160111)+, Upper Black Warrior (03160112)+
05 Stones (05130203)+, Harpeth (05130204)+
06 Lower Little Tennessee (06010204)+, Middle Tennessee-Chickamauga (06020001)+, Guntersville Lake (06030001)+, Wheeler Lake (06030002)+, Upper Elk (06030003)+, Lower Elk (06030004)+, Pickwick Lake (06030005)+
11 Bull Shoals Lake (11010003)+, Buffalo (11010005)+, Upper Black (11010007)+*, Current (11010008)+*, Dardanelle Reservoir (11110202)+, Cadron (11110205)+
+ Natural heritage record(s) exist for this watershed
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
Ecology & Life History
Help
Basic Description: A 1-2 m tall, deciduous, thicket-forming shrub with bright green leaves. Despite the absence of flower petals, the plant is showy when in bloom, with masses of feathery white stamens covering the plant during its peak flowering period. Highly distinct; the only other species in the genus - N. cliftonii - is a rare plant, found only in California. Outside of that, the species' nearest taxonomic relatives are members of Asian genera. Flowers mid to late April, with the sepals and calyx sometimes persisting until October.
Diagnostic Characteristics: Not easily confused with any other species. The showy white petalless flowers are highly distinctive. The only other shrubs which may superficially resemble Neviusia alabamensis are some forms of Spiraea; however, Spiraea lack the persistant stipules at the base of the leafstalk present in Neviusia (Patrick et al. 1995).
Palustrine Habitat(s): Riparian
Terrestrial Habitat(s): Bare rock/talus/scree, Forest/Woodland
Habitat Comments: Forested bluffs, talus slopes, and streambanks on a variety of geologic substrates, soil types, and aspects, and under open- to completely closed-canopy conditions. Most typical habitat may be within forested areas on thin soil over limestone that is moist for part of the year (seasonal streambeds, margins of sinkholes, riverbluffs). Usually found in large clonal clumps. Sites mostly map out along the edge of the Mississippi Embayment, a sediment-filled structural low that has been affected over geologic time by glaciation in the northern river basin and sea level changes to the south.
Economic Attributes Not yet assessed
Help
Management Summary
Help
Stewardship Overview: Management for this species primarily means avoiding timber harvesting and other forms of disturbance. Patrick et al. (1995) note: "At most this species will tolerate only hand thinning of trees in its immediate vicinity, and only if done carefully." Some careful thinning may be beneficial (Gay et al. 1996) to plants under a very closed canopy, but any disturbance which could facilitate invasion by aggressive exotic species should be avoided. Exotics, especially Japanese honeysuckle, have been identified as a serious threat at some sites. Japanese honeysuckle can best be controlled by applying herbicide after first frost or during winter months (when it is one of the few evergreen shrubs) to decrease accidental nontarget damage (Nuzzo 1997).
Population/Occurrence Delineation Not yet assessed
Help
Population/Occurrence Viability
Help
Excellent Viability: An A-rated occurrence of Neviusia alabamensis should contain 18,000 + stems or encompass a minimum of 0.5 acres in a functional forested landscape. These occurrences should have no or minimal disturbances (< 10 %) from invasive species and/or anthropogenic modifications.
Good Viability: A B-rated occurrence of Neviusia alabamensis should contain 5,000 to 17,999 stems or encompass between 0.25 and 0.5 acres in a functional forested landscape. These occurrences should have no or minimal disturbances (< 10 %) from invasive species and/or anthropogenic modifications. Larger occurrences with a higher incidence (to 40 %) of disturbance should be designated as a B-ranked occurrence.
Fair Viability: A C-rated occurrence of Neviusia alabamensis should contain 100 to 4,999 stems or encompass between 0.1 and 0.25 acres in a mature forested landscape. These occurrences should have no or minimal disturbances (< 10 %) from invasive species and/or anthropogenic modifications. Larger occurrences heavily impacted (to 80 %) by human-induced disturbances should be designated as a C-ranked occurrence.
Poor Viability: A D-rated occurrence of Neviusia alabamensis should contain less than 100 stems or encompass a maximum of 0.1 acres. These occurrences may either exist in high quality habitat or severely degraded conditions where restoration potential is limited. High quality sites will have potential for occurrences to expand.
Justification: Specifications are based on personal experience and Element Occurrence Records. Several occurrences reserved with C and D ranks inhabit exemplary habitat conditions, appear to be inherently small. Since the species is not known to reproduce sexually, the long-term viability of these occurrences may prove difficult to ascertain. No studies pertinent to population dynamics have been conducted. Given the preferred habitat of N. alabamensis - rocky forested bluffs and slopes - timber harvesting is the most apparent source of disturbance.

Key for Ranking Species Element Occurrences Using the Generic Approach (2008).
Date: 05Jan2004
Author: Schotz, Alfred
U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
Help
Authors/Contributors
Help
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Edition Date: 16Jun1997
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Author: Bridges, E., rev. Maybury/Hilton (1996); rev. Alfred R. Schotz (6/97)
Management Information Edition Date: 16Jul2004
Management Information Edition Author: Maybury, K.

Botanical data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs), The North Carolina Botanical Garden, and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References
Help
  • Flora of North America Editorial Committee. 2014b. Flora of North America North of Mexico. Vol. 9. Magnoliophyta: Picramniaceae to Rosaceae. Oxford University Press, New York. xxiv + 713 pp.

  • Gay, M., M. Pyne, A. Shea, and C. Nordman. 1996. Guide to rare plants - Tennessee Division of Forestry District 6. Tennessee Dept. Agriculture, Division of Forestry, Nashville.

  • Gray, A. 1859. Neviusia, a new genus of Rosaceae. Memoirs of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, New Series 6: 373-376.

  • Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.

  • Long, Alice A. 1989. Disjunct Populations of the rare shrub Neviusia alabamensis Gray (Rosaceae). Castanea 54(1):29-39.

  • Nuzzo, V. 1997. Element stewardship abstract for Lonicera japonica - Japanese honeysuckle. The Nature Conservancy. Arlington, VA.

  • Patrick, T.S., J.R. Allison, and G.A. Krakow. 1995. Protected plants of Georgia: an information manual on plants designated by the State of Georgia as endangered, threatened, rare, or unusual. Georgia Dept. Natural Resources, Wildlife Resources Division, Georgia Natural Heritage Program, Social Circle, Georgia. 218 pp + appendices.

  • Rogers, G., and P. Wilmes. 1989. The Alabama snow wreath. American Horticulturist April: 40-41.

  • Ruddiman, W.F., and H.E. Wright, Jr., eds. 1987. North America and adjacent oceans during the last deglaciation. Geological Society America, Inc., Boulder, CO.

  • Schotz, A. 1997. Status survey report on Neviusia alabamensis. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Jackson, MS.

  • Shevock, J., B. Ertter and D.W. taylor. 1992. Neviusia cliftonnii (Rosaceae: Kerrieae), an intriguing new relict species from California. Novon 2(4):285-289.

  • Small, J.K. 1933. Manual of the southeastern flora. Two volumes. Hafner Publishing Company, New York.

  • Southern Appalachian Species Viability Project. 2002. A partnership between the U.S. Forest Service-Region 8, Natural Heritage Programs in the Southeast, NatureServe, and independent scientists to develop and review data on 1300+ regionally and locally rare species in the Southern Appalachian and Alabama region. Database (Access 97) provided to the U.S. Forest Service by NatureServe, Durham, North Carolina.

  • Steyermark, J.A. 1963. Flora of Missouri. Iowa State Univ. Press, Ames. 1728 pp.

  • TUCKER, G.E. 1983. STATUS REPORT ON NEVIUSIA ALABAMENSIS A. GRAY. UNPUBLISHED REPORT SUBMITTED TO U.S. FISH & WILDLIFE S ERVICE.

Use Guidelines & Citation

Use Guidelines and Citation

The Small Print: Trademark, Copyright, Citation Guidelines, Restrictions on Use, and Information Disclaimer.

Note: All species and ecological community data presented in NatureServe Explorer at http://explorer.natureserve.org were updated to be current with NatureServe's central databases as of March 2018.
Note: This report was printed on

Trademark Notice: "NatureServe", NatureServe Explorer, The NatureServe logo, and all other names of NatureServe programs referenced herein are trademarks of NatureServe. Any other product or company names mentioned herein are the trademarks of their respective owners.

Copyright Notice: Copyright © 2018 NatureServe, 4600 N. Fairfax Dr., 7th Floor, Arlington Virginia 22203, U.S.A. All Rights Reserved. Each document delivered from this server or web site may contain other proprietary notices and copyright information relating to that document. The following citation should be used in any published materials which reference the web site.

Citation for data on website including State Distribution, Watershed, and Reptile Range maps:
NatureServe. 2018. NatureServe Explorer: An online encyclopedia of life [web application]. Version 7.1. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia. Available http://explorer.natureserve.org. (Accessed:

Citation for Bird Range Maps of North America:
Ridgely, R.S., T.F. Allnutt, T. Brooks, D.K. McNicol, D.W. Mehlman, B.E. Young, and J.R. Zook. 2003. Digital Distribution Maps of the Birds of the Western Hemisphere, version 1.0. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Acknowledgement Statement for Bird Range Maps of North America:
"Data provided by NatureServe in collaboration with Robert Ridgely, James Zook, The Nature Conservancy - Migratory Bird Program, Conservation International - CABS, World Wildlife Fund - US, and Environment Canada - WILDSPACE."

Citation for Mammal Range Maps of North America:
Patterson, B.D., G. Ceballos, W. Sechrest, M.F. Tognelli, T. Brooks, L. Luna, P. Ortega, I. Salazar, and B.E. Young. 2003. Digital Distribution Maps of the Mammals of the Western Hemisphere, version 1.0. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Acknowledgement Statement for Mammal Range Maps of North America:
"Data provided by NatureServe in collaboration with Bruce Patterson, Wes Sechrest, Marcelo Tognelli, Gerardo Ceballos, The Nature Conservancy-Migratory Bird Program, Conservation International-CABS, World Wildlife Fund-US, and Environment Canada-WILDSPACE."

Citation for Amphibian Range Maps of the Western Hemisphere:
IUCN, Conservation International, and NatureServe. 2004. Global Amphibian Assessment. IUCN, Conservation International, and NatureServe, Washington, DC and Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Acknowledgement Statement for Amphibian Range Maps of the Western Hemisphere:
"Data developed as part of the Global Amphibian Assessment and provided by IUCN-World Conservation Union, Conservation International and NatureServe."

NOTE: Full metadata for the Bird Range Maps of North America is available at:
http://www.natureserve.org/library/birdDistributionmapsmetadatav1.pdf.

Full metadata for the Mammal Range Maps of North America is available at:
http://www.natureserve.org/library/mammalsDistributionmetadatav1.pdf.

Restrictions on Use: Permission to use, copy and distribute documents delivered from this server is hereby granted under the following conditions:
  1. The above copyright notice must appear in all copies;
  2. Any use of the documents available from this server must be for informational purposes only and in no instance for commercial purposes;
  3. Some data may be downloaded to files and altered in format for analytical purposes, however the data should still be referenced using the citation above;
  4. No graphics available from this server can be used, copied or distributed separate from the accompanying text. Any rights not expressly granted herein are reserved by NatureServe. Nothing contained herein shall be construed as conferring by implication, estoppel, or otherwise any license or right under any trademark of NatureServe. No trademark owned by NatureServe may be used in advertising or promotion pertaining to the distribution of documents delivered from this server without specific advance permission from NatureServe. Except as expressly provided above, nothing contained herein shall be construed as conferring any license or right under any NatureServe copyright.
Information Warranty Disclaimer: All documents and related graphics provided by this server and any other documents which are referenced by or linked to this server are provided "as is" without warranty as to the currentness, completeness, or accuracy of any specific data. NatureServe hereby disclaims all warranties and conditions with regard to any documents provided by this server or any other documents which are referenced by or linked to this server, including but not limited to all implied warranties and conditions of merchantibility, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement. NatureServe makes no representations about the suitability of the information delivered from this server or any other documents that are referenced to or linked to this server. In no event shall NatureServe be liable for any special, indirect, incidental, consequential damages, or for damages of any kind arising out of or in connection with the use or performance of information contained in any documents provided by this server or in any other documents which are referenced by or linked to this server, under any theory of liability used. NatureServe may update or make changes to the documents provided by this server at any time without notice; however, NatureServe makes no commitment to update the information contained herein. Since the data in the central databases are continually being updated, it is advisable to refresh data retrieved at least once a year after its receipt. The data provided is for planning, assessment, and informational purposes. Site specific projects or activities should be reviewed for potential environmental impacts with appropriate regulatory agencies. If ground-disturbing activities are proposed on a site, the appropriate state natural heritage program(s) or conservation data center can be contacted for a site-specific review of the project area (see Visit Local Programs).

Feedback Request: NatureServe encourages users to let us know of any errors or significant omissions that you find in the data through (see Contact Us). Your comments will be very valuable in improving the overall quality of our databases for the benefit of all users.