Mentzelia springeri - (Standl.) Tidestrom
Santa Fe Stickyleaf
Other English Common Names: Santa Fe Blazingstar, Springer's blazing star
Other Common Names: Santa Fe blazingstar
Taxonomic Status: Accepted
Related ITIS Name(s): Mentzelia springeri (Standl.) Tidestrom (TSN 503807)
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.142593
Element Code: PDLOA031N0
Informal Taxonomy: Plants, Vascular - Flowering Plants - Blazingstar Family
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Plantae Anthophyta Dicotyledoneae Violales Loasaceae Mentzelia
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Concept Reference
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Concept Reference: Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.
Concept Reference Code: B94KAR01HQUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Mentzelia springeri
Taxonomic Comments: Included within M. multiflora by Darlington (1934) despite its leaves, flowers, and capsules being smaller than the limits put forward for M. multiflora, and its having a bushier growth form and stem tips ending in single flowers (rather than clusters of 1-3 flowers) (Sivinski 1998). Darlington also assigned one very probable M. springeri specimen to M. multicaulis, which differs from M. springeri in its clustered, 5- petaled flowers, larger capsules, and geographic range (CO and UT) (Sivinski 1998). Included in M. pumila var. integra by Martin and Hutchins (1981), despite its having lighter-colored flowers and linear (rather than oblanceolate) leaves (Sivinski 1998). Recognized as distinct by Tidestrom and Kittell (1941), Sivinski (1998), and Kartesz (1994 and 1999).
Conservation Status
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NatureServe Status

Global Status: G3
Global Status Last Reviewed: 15Apr2009
Global Status Last Changed: 15Apr2009
Rounded Global Status: G3 - Vulnerable
Reasons: Endemic to north-central New Mexico, where known from a small range on the slopes of the Jemez Mountains in Los Alamos, northeastern Sandoval, and northwestern Santa Fe counties. At least seven occurrences are known; more may eventually be documented since the species is poorly studied and much of the range is in remote areas. All currently known sites may comprise just a few metapopulations, given site proximity and likely pollinators. A few dozen to several hundred individuals are present at each of the known locations; at least 10,000 individuals may exist, but this number of plants has not yet been documented. There are no significant known threats.
Nation: United States
National Status: NNR

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
United States New Mexico (S3)

Other Statuses

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent Comments: Endemic to north-central New Mexico, on the southern, southwestern, and eastern slopes of the Jemez Mountains in Los Alamos and northeastern Sandoval counties and in extreme northwestern Santa Fe County along White Rock Canyon near the Los Alamos County line (Sivinski 1998, 1999; R. Sivinski pers. comm. 2009). May also be present in similar habitat in southeastern Rio Arriba County (Santa Clara Indian Reservation), also on on the southwest slope of the Jemez Mountains (R. Sivinski pers. comm. 2009). Much of the range is found in and around Bandelier National Monument (Holmgren and Holmgren 2002). Using GIS tools, range extent was calculated to be approximately 350 square km.

Number of Occurrences: 1 - 80
Number of Occurrences Comments: Six occurrences are mapped in the Natural Heritage New Mexico database. At least eight additional herbarium specimens have been collected since the most recent observation date in that database, so there may be one to a few more documented sites; there is almost certainly at least one more documented site, since several of the recent collections are from Los Alamos County, unlike any of the mapped occurrences. Bob Sivinski, who has made many observations of this species in the field, estimates that he has seen it in approximately 10 places, although many of these places are within a mile of other known locations (and so might be mapped as the same occurrence) (R. Sivinski pers. comm. 2009). All of these known (documented and observed) sites may comprise just a few metapopulations that are sufficiently isolated to have very infrequent gene exchange, as pollinators may frequently carry pollen among some of the known sites (R. Sivinski pers. comm. 2009). Nevertheless, it is probable that as-yet undocumented occurrences exist, as this species has not been adequately studied, and much of the range occurs in remote areas (such as the Bandelier National Monument Wilderness Area).

Population Size Comments: Numbers of individuals range from a few dozen to several hundred at each of the known locations (R. Sivinski pers. comm. 2009); the species was described as "common" at one site where collected in 2003. Bob Sivinski suspects that at least 10,000 individuals exist but has not personally seen that many (R. Sivinski pers. comm. 2009).

Overall Threat Impact: Low
Overall Threat Impact Comments: There are no significant known threats to this species (R. Sivinski pers. comm. 2009). Much of the range occurs in remote areas, including the Bandelier National Monument Wilderness Area. In addition, it favorably responds to soil disturbance within its habitats and readily colonizes road cuts and pumice quarries (Sivinski 1999, R. Sivinski pers. comm. 2009).

Short-term Trend Comments: One frequently-observed group of plants appears to be stable in number over last several years (R. Sivinski pers. comm. 2009).

Intrinsic Vulnerability Comments: Favorably responds to soil disturbance within its habitat and readily colonizes road cuts and pumice quarries (Sivinski 1999, R. Sivinski pers. comm. 2009).

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
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Global Range: Endemic to north-central New Mexico, on the southern, southwestern, and eastern slopes of the Jemez Mountains in Los Alamos and northeastern Sandoval counties and in extreme northwestern Santa Fe County along White Rock Canyon near the Los Alamos County line (Sivinski 1998, 1999; R. Sivinski pers. comm. 2009). May also be present in similar habitat in southeastern Rio Arriba County (Santa Clara Indian Reservation), also on on the southwest slope of the Jemez Mountains (R. Sivinski pers. comm. 2009). Much of the range is found in and around Bandelier National Monument (Holmgren and Holmgren 2002). Using GIS tools, range extent was calculated to be approximately 350 square km.

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
Color legend for Distribution Map

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States NM

Range Map
No map available.


U.S. Distribution by County Help
State County Name (FIPS Code)
NM Los Alamos (35028), Sandoval (35043), Santa Fe (35049)
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
U.S. Distribution by Watershed Help
Watershed Region Help Watershed Name (Watershed Code)
13 Upper Rio Grande (13020101)+, Rio Grande-Santa Fe (13020201)+, Jemez (13020202)+
+ Natural heritage record(s) exist for this watershed
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
Ecology & Life History
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Basic Description: A bushy perennial herb to subshrub with white stems and small, bright yellow flowers. Plants have numerous, slender, divergently branching stems with small, linear leaves having smooth or slightly toothed margins. Flowers open in late afternoon, July-August.
Technical Description: From Sivinski (1999): "Perennial herb; stems several with numerous branches (bushy appearance), slender, 3-5 dm tall, white, glabrous to above the middle, puberulent near the top; basal leaves absent; lower stem leaves narrowly lanceolate to linear, up to 4 cm long, entire or with a few shallow teeth; upper stem leaves linear and mostly entire, usually less than 2.5 cm long; herbage pubescent with barbed hairs (stick to cloth); flowers solitary at the ends of slender branches; petals 10, bright yellow, 10-15 mm long; capsules narrowly cylindrical, 5-10 mm long; seeds lenticular, narrowly winged. Flowers open in late afternoon, July through August."
Diagnostic Characteristics: The very small, narrow capsules of M. springeri distinguish it from other perennial Mentzelia in New Mexico (Sivinski 1998). Mentzelia multiflora occurs on similar habitats in the Jemez Mountains. M. springeri is distinguished from M. multiflora by its perennial life history (compared to the biennial life history of M. multiflora), its several slender stems with numerous branches (compared to one or a few stout stems with fewer branches), its solitary flowers at the ends of slender branches (compared to 1-3 flowers at the ends of branches), its smaller narrower leaves with margins entire or with a few shallow teeth (compared to toothed or pinnatifid margins), its flowers with bright yellow petals (compared to cream-colored or pale yellow petals), and its narrower capsules 5-10 mm long (compared to 12-18 mm long) (Sivinski 1999). Holmgren and Holmgren (2002) state that M. springeri is distinguished from their recently-described M. memorabalis (endemic to northern Arizona) by its more widely divaricate branches, its toothed to shallowly lobed lower leaves, its longer petals (13-15 mm), and its narrowly cylindrical capsules (9.5-11 mm high, 2.8-4 mm thick). Also appears to closely resemble M. densa (endemic to Colorado), from which it can be separated by its ascending to erect stems with pilulose pubescence on the upper stem (compared to the hispid and spreading stems of M. densa, which form a hemispherical tuft); its entire or remotely dentate-pinnatifid leaf margins (compared to the sinuate-pinnatifid leaves with longer lobes of M. densa); and its 5-10 mm (compared to 13-15 mm) long capsules (Sivinski 1998).
Terrestrial Habitat(s): Forest - Conifer, Forest Edge, Forest/Woodland, Woodland - Conifer
Habitat Comments: Appears to be restricted to rhyolite and pumice outcrops, on loose substrates of volcanic pumice and unconsolidated pyroclastic ash. These outcrops occur within pinyon-juniper woodland and lower montane coniferous (ponderosa pine) forest. Often seen where roads cut through pumice. Associated species include Fallugia paradoxa, Ericameria nauseosa, Stephanomeria pauciflora, Gilia pinnatifida, and Phacelia integrifolia. 1850-2450 m.
Economic Attributes Not yet assessed
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Management Summary Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Delineation Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Viability
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U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
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Authors/Contributors
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NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Edition Date: 15Apr2009
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Author: Gravuer, K.

Botanical data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs), The North Carolina Botanical Garden, and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References
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  • Darlington, J. 1934. A monograph of the genus Mentzelia. Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden 21: 103-227.

  • Holmgren., N. H. and P. K. Holmgren. 2002. New Mentzelias (Loasaceae) from the Intermountain region of western United States. Systematic Botany 27(4): 747-762.

  • Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.

  • Martin, W.C., and C.R. Hutchins. 1980-1981. A flora of New Mexico. 2 vols. J. Cramer, in der A.R. Gantner Verlag, K.G., Vaduz, Liechtenstein. 2591 pp.

  • Sivinski, R. 1999. New Mexico Rare Plants: Mentzelia springeri (Springer's blazing star). New Mexico Rare Plant Technical Council, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Online. Available: http://nmrareplants.unm.edu (Accessed 2009).

  • Sivinski, R. C. 1998. Review and resurrection of Mentzelia springeri (Losaceae). New Mexico Naturalist's Notes 1(2): 43-45.

  • Tidestrom, I., and T. Kittell. 1941. A flora of Arizona and New Mexico. Catholic Univ. of America Press, Washington, D.C.

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