Lomatium erythrocarpum - Meinke & Constance
Red-fruit Lomatium
Other English Common Names: Red-fruited Lomatium
Taxonomic Status: Accepted
Related ITIS Name(s): Lomatium erythrocarpum Meinke & Constance (TSN 503535)
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.149411
Element Code: PDAPI1B260
Informal Taxonomy: Plants, Vascular - Flowering Plants - Carrot Family
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Plantae Anthophyta Dicotyledoneae Apiales Apiaceae Lomatium
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Concept Reference
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Concept Reference: Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.
Concept Reference Code: B94KAR01HQUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Lomatium erythrocarpum
Conservation Status
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NatureServe Status

Global Status: G1G2
Global Status Last Reviewed: 02Apr2013
Global Status Last Changed: 02Apr2013
Ranking Methodology Used: Ranked by calculator
Rounded Global Status: G1 - Critically Imperiled
Reasons: Endemic to a small, high elevation area of the Blue Mountains of eastern Oregon. While only a few populations are known, they appear to be stable with an estimated total population of about 6000 plants. Although there are some documented impacts from mountain goats, a non-native species introduced to the area in the 1980s, plant populations remain stable. Climate change is a major threat to this high-elevation species. Monitoring should continue to keep tabs on these threats.
Nation: United States
National Status: N1N2

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
United States Oregon (S1S2)

Other Statuses

Comments on USESA: Was previously a candidate, but was removed from candidacy on February 28, 1996 in a notice of review.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Lead Region: R1 - Pacific

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent Comments: Elkhorn Range including Baker, Union, and Grant Counties, Oregon, U.S.A. 7 km2 calculated using convex hull.

Area of Occupancy: 3-5 4-km2 grid cells
Area of Occupancy Comments: Five 4 sq km grid cells occupied.

Number of Occurrences: 1 - 5
Number of Occurrences Comments: Known only from a few sites. 5 EOs using 1 km separation distance.

Population Size Comments: An estimated 6325 plants in the 2000s, but counts fluctuate depending on timing of surveys and winter snow pack but probably not more than several thousand plants.

Number of Occurrences with Good Viability/Integrity: Very few (1-3)
Viability/Integrity Comments: 2 EOs with good viability.

Overall Threat Impact: High
Overall Threat Impact Comments: Hikers, trail maintenance crews, mountain goats, though these have so far had minimal impact on populations. Climate change may be the greatest threat leading to loss of alpine habitat.

Short-term Trend: Relatively Stable (<=10% change)
Short-term Trend Comments: Most sites are stable or increasing.

Long-term Trend: Unknown

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
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Global Range: Elkhorn Range including Baker, Union, and Grant Counties, Oregon, U.S.A. 7 km2 calculated using convex hull.

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
Color legend for Distribution Map

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States OR

Range Map
No map available.


U.S. Distribution by County Help
State County Name (FIPS Code)
OR Baker (41001)
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
U.S. Distribution by Watershed Help
Watershed Region Help Watershed Name (Watershed Code)
17 Powder (17050203)+
+ Natural heritage record(s) exist for this watershed
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
Ecology & Life History
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Basic Description: A diminutive perennial herb, usually 2-7 cm tall, that produces clusters of white flowers with purple anthers in June, often before the fern-like foliage appears. Conspicuous reddish fruits mature by mid-July.
Technical Description: Plant perennial, odorless, acaulescent or very short-stemmed, 2-7 (-9) cm tall, glabrous throughout, the stems, petioles, and peduncles often purplish; the underground stem (pseudoscape) prominent, 1.5-6.5 (-10) cm long, clothed by one or more scarious, dilated sheaths at base, arising from a simple or very rarely 2-3 branched caudex surmounting an elongate, thickened taproot up to 2 dm long and 3-9 mm wide; leaves 1-3, inserted at ground level and typically lying flat against the substrate, dull olive green or grayish and more or less glaucous, triangular to triangular-hastate; rachis much flattened and conspicuously winged, particularly distally, up to 1.5 mm broad near apex; blade, when expanded, 1.0-3.5 cm long, 0.5-2.7 cm wide, the 3-5 paris of oblong to oval leaflets 5-15 mm long and 3-8 mm broad, 3-4 times pinnately divided into numerous irregular segments, slightly crisped on the margins, typically congested and overlapping, the ultimate divisions lanceolate or oblong, acutish, 0.8-2.5 mm long, 0.4-1.5 mm wide, obscurely scaberulous on margins, with simple, non-reticulate venation; petiole mostly shorter than the blade, 0.4-2.0 cm long, 0.3-0.9 cm wide, usually sheathing throughout or occasionally only to the middle, rarely up to 3-4 times longer than blade and not sheathing; inflorescence appearing with or occasionally well before foliage, 0.8-1.8 cm across; peduncles 1-2 (-4), 1.5-5.5 cm long, erect or curved-spreading, slightly exceeding leaves; involucre none, the umbel rarely subtended by a tripinnate bract 0.5-1.0 cm long; fertile rays 1-3 (if 1, the umble appearing simple), spreading or ascending in fruit, unequal, 1-7 mm long; involucel absent or usually present but inconspicuous, consisting of 1-8 linear to narrowly lanceolate separate bractlets 1-3 (-4.5) mm long, the margins narrowly scarious; umbellets 5-20 flowered, 0-10 (-12) developing fruit; pedicels 3-7 mm long in fruit, spreading or recurved; ovaries glabrous; sepals obsolete, or present but very inconspicuous, purple; petals, anthers, and stylopodia purplish-white (petals with a purple midvein), fading to white; styles 0.8-1.2 mm long, recurved; fruit dorsally compressed, oblong-elliptic, glabrous and glossy, often conspicuously red-tinged at maturity, 7-9 mm long, 4-5 mm wide, rounded to truncate at apex and base; lateral wings thin, narrower than body, 0.8-1.2 mm wide, the dorsal ribs unwinged; vittae crowded, (2-) 3-5 in the intervals, 4-6 on the commissure; carpophore bipartite, persistent. (Meinke 1984)
Reproduction Comments: Seeds are dispersed by wind and gravity (Meinke 1987 cited in Guerrant 2001).
Terrestrial Habitat(s): Bare rock/talus/scree, Forest Edge, Forest/Woodland, Shrubland/chaparral, Woodland - Conifer
Habitat Comments: Dry, moderately steep, south- and east-facing (full sun exposure) slopes and ridges. Substrate is sandy-stony soil, loose gravel, and talus, derived from granodiorite; distribution suggests an avoidance of calcareous substrates. Generally found in open areas, in the ecotone between shrub-steppe vegetation, dominated by mountain mahogany (Cercocarpus ledifolius) and big sagebrush (Artemesia tridentata), and subalpine woodland, dominated by white-bark pine (Pinus albicaulis) and Engelmann's spruce (Picea engelmannii). Associated species include Lupinus caudatus, Polygonum phytolaccaefolium, Castilleja applegatei, Haplopappus lyallii, Linum lewisii, Lomatium cusickii, Viola purpurea, Pteryxia terebinthina, Kellogia galioides, Phlox austromontana, and Trisetum spicatum. A high elevation species generally found above 2500 m, sometimes as low as 2300 m.
Economic Attributes
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Economically Important Genus: Y
Management Summary Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Delineation Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Viability
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U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
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Authors/Contributors
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NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Edition Date: 20Sep2012
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Author: Joyal, E., rev. Vrilakas/Kagan/Maybury (1996), rev. K. Gravuer (2008), rev. Lindsey Wise (2012).

Botanical data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs), The North Carolina Botanical Garden, and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References
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  • Guerrant, E. 2001. National Collection Plant Profile: Lomatium erythrocarpum, Center for Plant Conservation. Online. Available: www.centerforplantconservation.org/ASP/CPC_ViewProfile.asp?CPCNum=2662 (Accessed 2008).

  • Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.

  • Meinke, R.J., and L. Constance. 1984. A new subalpine species of Lomatium (Umbelliferae) from eastern Oregon. Bull. Torrey Botanical Club 111(2): 222-226.

  • Meinke, Robert J. 1987. Status report for Lomatium erythrocarpum. Oregon Natural Heritage Data Base, The Nature Conservancy, Portland.

  • Meinke, Robert J. and Lincoln Constance. 1984. A new subalpine species of Lomatium (Umbelliferae) from eastern Oregon. Torreya 111: 222-226.

  • Oregon Natural Heritage Information Center. 2008, 15 July last update. Oregon threatened or endangered plant field guide. Online. Available: http://oregonstate.edu/ornhic/plants/view_plants2.php (Accessed 2008).

  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). 1995. Category and listing priority assignment form: Lomatium erythrocarpum. Lead Field Office: Boise, ID. 4 pp.

  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS. 1996. Endangered and threatened species; Notice of reclassification of 96 candidate taxa. Federal Register 61(40): 7457-7463. Feb. 28, 1996.

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