Lepechinia rossii - S. Boyd & O. Mistretta
Ross' Pitcher Sage
Taxonomic Status: Provisionally accepted
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.795433
Element Code: PDLAM0V060
Informal Taxonomy: Plants, Vascular - Flowering Plants - Mint Family
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Plantae Anthophyta Dicotyledoneae Lamiales Lamiaceae Lepechinia
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Concept Reference
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Concept Reference: Boyd, S. and O. Mistretta. 2006. Lepechinia rossii (Lamiaceae), a narrow endemic from the western Transverse Ranges of southern California. Madroņo 53(1): 77-84.
Concept Reference Code: A06BOY01HQUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Lepechinia rossii
Taxonomic Comments: A newly described species narrowly endemic to the western Transverse Ranges of southern California, most readily set apart from other members of the genus by a suite of inflorescence characters (Boyd and Mistretta 2006).
Conservation Status
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NatureServe Status

Global Status: G1
Global Status Last Reviewed: 18May2016
Global Status Last Changed: 01Nov2006
Ranking Methodology Used: Ranked by calculator
Rounded Global Status: G1 - Critically Imperiled
Reasons: This species, newly described in 2006, is narrowly endemic to the western Transverse Ranges of southern California (Los Angeles and Ventura counties). Three to four occurrences are known, from two areas separated by a distance of ca. 40 km. One of the known areas contains ca. 500-1000 individuals, while the other known area may be a broad metapopulation extending over at least ca. 3.3 km. Both areas are of relatively limited aerial extent. The species occurs within relatively open sites in chaparral vegetation that are created by, e.g., fire, fuel breaks, road cuts, or death of mature dominant shrubs. Threats include habitat disturbance by off-highway vehicle (OHV) activity, maintenance of electric power line towers, and petroleum exploration and extraction, as well as type-conversion of habitat due to invasion by exotic grasses.
Nation: United States
National Status: N1

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
United States California (S1)

Other Statuses

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent Comments: Narrowly endemic to the western Transverse Ranges of southern California.

Area of Occupancy: 3-5 4-km2 grid cells
Area of Occupancy Comments:  

Number of Occurrences: 1 - 5
Number of Occurrences Comments: Occurs at 3-4 sites in two areas of California: the Liebre Mountains in Los Angeles County and the Topatopa Mountains in Ventura County.

Population Size Comments: The Liebre Mountains area contains ca. 500-1000 individuals. The Topatopa Mountains area apparently has not been counted, but may be a broad metapopulation extending over at least ca. 3.3 km of creeks.

Number of Occurrences with Good Viability/Integrity: Unknown

Overall Threat Impact: Very high
Overall Threat Impact Comments: Direct threats include localized habitat disturbance by off-highway vehicle (OHV) activity, maintenance of electric power line towers, and grading of pads for petroleum exploration and potentially extraction. Also of general concern is type-conversion of habitat due to invasion by exotic grasses (e.g. Bromus diandrus, B. madritensis ssp. rubens, Vulpia myuros) and concomitant increase in fire frequency, because this species is associated with earlier phases of post-fire succession.

Short-term Trend: Unknown

Long-term Trend: Unknown

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
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Global Range: Narrowly endemic to the western Transverse Ranges of southern California.

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
Color legend for Distribution Map

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States CA

Range Map
No map available.


U.S. Distribution by County Help
State County Name (FIPS Code)
CA Los Angeles (06037), Ventura (06111)
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
U.S. Distribution by Watershed Help
Watershed Region Help Watershed Name (Watershed Code)
18 Santa Clara (18070102)+
+ Natural heritage record(s) exist for this watershed
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
Ecology & Life History
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Basic Description: Shrub, often forming clonal stands following disturbance or fire, generally less than 1.5 m tall with numerous ascending to erect branches from base and strongly aromatic herbage. Leaves opposite, blades bright, light green or yellowish green, ovate to deltate-ovate, 3-13 cm long. Inflorescence bent 60-90° relative to subtending stem. Bracts foliaceous, broadly ovate to suborbicular, 2.5-8 cm, generally longer than subtended flower and not strongly reduced in size distally. Flowers pendent and solitary in bract axils. Corolla broadly tubular, 3.3-3.9 cm long, 5-lobed and strongly bilateral, initially pale yellowish cream with small maroon spots, fading to off-white with spots becoming very pale or disappearing (Boyd and Mistretta 2006).
Diagnostic Characteristics: A suite of inflorescence characters most readily set this species apart from other members of the genus. These include (1) orientation of the inflorescence axes (in this species, inflorescence is geniculate, bent ą 60-90° relative to subtending stem and thus arching or spreading), (2) size, shape, and orientation of the floral bracts (in this species, bracts are foliaceous, sessile, ascending, broadly ovate to suborbicular, 2.5-8 cm, generally longer than subtended flower and not strongly reduced in size distally, therefore appearing imbricate towards apex of inflorescence), and (3) the degree to which these bracts are reduced apically (Boyd and Mistretta 2006).
Duration: PERENNIAL
Terrestrial Habitat(s): Shrubland/chaparral
Habitat Comments: According to Boyd and Mistretta (2006), associated with chaparral vegetation characterized by a mix of shrubs. Generally associated with relatively open areas, often appearing in greatest abundance following wildland fire, or at least temporarily, in areas affected by anthropogenic disturbance, such as fuel breaks and road cuts. Within mature stands of chaparral, the species is largely limited to small natural openings. Generally found on north- to northeast-facing slopes, and on adjacent portions of ridgelines. Substrates include fine-grained, reddish, nonmarine and marine sedimentary rocks of various ages and volcanics. Co-occurring species include Adenostoma fasciculatum Hook. & Arn., Cercocarpus betuloides Nutt. ex Torr. & A. Gray, Clematis lasiantha Nutt., Eriodictyon crassifolium Benth. var. nigrescens Brand, Eriogonum fasciculatum Benth. var. foliolosum (Nutt.) S. Stokes ex Abrams, Eriophyllum confertiflorum (DC.) A. Gray, Fraxinus dipetala Hook. & Arn., Quercus berberidifolia Liebm., Heteromeles arbutifolia (Lindl.) M. Roem., Keckiella cordifolia (Benth.) Straw, Rhamnus ilicifolia Kellogg, Ribes malvaceum Sm., and Solanum xanti A. Gray. 300 - 800 m.
Economic Attributes Not yet assessed
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Management Summary Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Delineation Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Viability
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U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
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Authors/Contributors
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NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Edition Date: 18May2016
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Author: Gravuer, K. (2006), rev. Treher and Bittman (2016)

Botanical data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs), The North Carolina Botanical Garden, and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References
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  • Boyd, S. and O. Mistretta. 2006. Lepechinia rossii (Lamiaceae), a narrow endemic from the western Transverse Ranges of southern California. Madroņo 53(1): 77-84.

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