Hypericum lissophloeus - P. Adams
Smooth-barked St. John's-wort
Other English Common Names: Silverbark St. John's-wort, Smoothbark St. John's-wort
Other Common Names: smoothbark St. Johnswort
Taxonomic Status: Accepted
Related ITIS Name(s): Hypericum lissophloeus P. Adams (TSN 503139)
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.136635
Element Code: PDCLU030Z0
Informal Taxonomy: Plants, Vascular - Flowering Plants - St. John's-Wort Family
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Plantae Anthophyta Dicotyledoneae Theales Clusiaceae Hypericum
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Concept Reference
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Concept Reference: Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.
Concept Reference Code: B94KAR01HQUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Hypericum lissophloeus
Taxonomic Comments: Distinct, one of many species in this genus.
Conservation Status
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NatureServe Status

Global Status: G2
Global Status Last Reviewed: 28Jul2009
Global Status Last Changed: 22Jan1985
Rounded Global Status: G2 - Imperiled
Reasons: Endemic to the karst pond area of Bay and Washington counties, Florida, where it occurs on the fluctuating shores of karst sinkhole ponds and small lakes. Within this very narrow geographic and habitat range, the species can be quite locally abundant, often dominating the pond shores where it occurs; occurrences with tens to hundreds of thousands of plants have been documented. Approximately 125-140 occurrences may be extant, although some are in close proximity. Some occurrences are on land owned by the Northwest Florida Water Management District, where they are protected from direct threats. However, occurrences on private lands are threatened by rapid lakeshore development in this region, which can result in clearing of lakeshore vegetation to create beaches. Other threats include erosion from disturbance of the surrounding upland longleaf pine-deciduous scrub oak sandhills matrix (forestry, development, road maintenance), prolonged drought, and recreational use of the lakeshores.
Nation: United States
National Status: N2

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
United States Florida (S2)

Other Statuses

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent Comments: Endemic to the karst pond area of Bay and Washington counties, Florida, at about the longitude of Panama City.

Area of Occupancy: 126-2,500 4-km2 grid cells
Area of Occupancy Comments: Using a 2 x 2 km grid, approximately 69 grid cells are occupied.

Number of Occurrences: 21 - 300
Number of Occurrences Comments: Approximately 125-140 occurrences may be extant, although some of the occurrences are in close proximity; the total could be less than 80 if closely adjacent sites are considered the same occurrence.

Population Size Comments: Locally abundant (Godfrey and Wooten 1981); may be the most abundant shrub on the shores of the ponds where it occurs (Kral 1983). Many occurrences seem to number in the thousands, and some occurrences in the tens to hundreds of thousands have been documented. Forms solid ring around ponds -- can be difficult to determine whether these are individuals or clones.

Number of Occurrences with Good Viability/Integrity: Some (13-40)

Overall Threat Impact: High
Overall Threat Impact Comments: Occurrences on private lands are threatened by the rapid lakeshore development in this region; shoreline development is noted as an imminent threat to several occurrences. Development can lead to complete clearing of the shoreline vegetation to create beaches as well as disturbance to adjacent upland vegetation. However, the species also occurs at some smaller ponds that appear more secure from shoreline development, and some occurrences are on land owned by the Northwest FloridaWater Management District and thus protected from this threat. Disturbance of the surrounding upland matrix is also a threat, as it can lead to increased erosion into the ponds; disturbance can result from activities such as forestry operations (especially initial site clearing and preparation), upland development, and road maintenance. Prolonged droughts can also be a threat to this species; the drought of 1999-2003 resulted in the death of many plants, with some but not all populations since rebounding from the seed bank. Other threats include increased recreational use of the ponds, particularly ORV use.

Environmental Specificity: Very narrow. Specialist or community with key requirements scarce.
Environmental Specificity Comments: Completely dependent on specialized habitat.

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
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Global Range: Endemic to the karst pond area of Bay and Washington counties, Florida, at about the longitude of Panama City.

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
Color legend for Distribution Map

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States FL

Range Map
No map available.


U.S. Distribution by County Help
State County Name (FIPS Code)
FL Bay (12005), Washington (12133)
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
U.S. Distribution by Watershed Help
Watershed Region Help Watershed Name (Watershed Code)
03 St. Andrew-St. Joseph Bays (03140101)+, Lower Choctawhatchee (03140203)+
+ Natural heritage record(s) exist for this watershed
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
Ecology & Life History
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Basic Description: A shrub growing to 4 m in height from diffuse roots. Stems tend to remain unbranched until the top, where they become much-branched. The bark is smooth. Leaves are needle-like, 10-15 mm long. Flowers are usually solitary or in clusters of 3 in the upper leaf axils. Petals, 5, are yellow-orange in color. Young growth has a waxy, whitish or bluish cast. Flowers May to frost (Ward 1979, Kral 1983).
Technical Description: "Stems to 4 m tall, the stems limber, to 4.5 cm thick near the base, the floriferous branches thin-flexuous, ascending, the flowers mostly solitary in the leaf-axils, occasionally in 3-flowered cymes. Leaves articulate at the base, linear-subulate and needlelike, the larger ones mostly (10-) 12-17 mm long, strongly glaucous, the edges strongly curved downward, in drying flattened against the lower surface, punctate-dotted mostly along the revolute edges. Sepals 5, articulate at the base, subulate, 7-8 mm long, revolute, deciduous by the time the fruits are fully ripe. Petals 5, bright yellow, asymmetrical, obovate, with a tooth obliquely placed to one side of the summit, 10-12 mm long. Stamens many. Styles 3, rarely 4, connivent at anthesis. Capsules ovate-conic, narrowly depressed along the sutures, lustrous reddish brown, 6-8 mm long, styles slender, erect, about 4 mm long, often breaking off near the base by maturity of the capsules. Seeds oblong, tan to brown, 1.5 mm long or a little more, surfaces longitudinally marked striate, with faint cross striae between." (Small, 1933)
Diagnostic Characteristics: Hypericum lissophloeus may be characterized from other needle-leaved species of its genus first by its peculiar smooth bark that below separates like birch, by the metallic appearance of the bark of upper trunk and bases of larger branches, by the tallness and willowiness of habit, by the glaucousness of fresh shoots and leaves, and by the strongly ribbed character of the seed (Kral, 1983).
Duration: PERENNIAL, Long-lived
Lacustrine Habitat(s): Shallow water
Palustrine Habitat(s): Riparian, SCRUB-SHRUB WETLAND
Terrestrial Habitat(s): Forest/Woodland, Savanna, Woodland - Conifer
Habitat Comments: Fluctuating shores of karst sinkhole ponds and small lakes, which are set within longleaf pine-deciduous scrub oak sandhills on the Coastal Plain. Plants tend to occur in a band around these ponds; plants may be almost entirely submersed at high water (to 1.5 m deep) to entirely exposed at low water. Most often found in full sun; may also occur in light shade of scattered cypress. Substrate tends to be moist to wet peaty, acidic sand. Associated species include several other rare endemics such as Xyris longisepala, Xyris isoetifolia, and Rhexia salicifolia. Herbaceous cover under and around the Hypericum is primarily grass-sedge with some Eriocaulon, Xyris, Drosera, Sabatia, Rhexia, Proserpinaca, Centella, Hydrocotyle, Ludwigia, and composites.
Economic Attributes Not yet assessed
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Management Summary Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Delineation Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Viability
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U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
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Authors/Contributors
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NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Edition Date: 01Jun1991
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Author: Hardin, E.D., rev. D.L. White, rev. K. Gravuer (2009)
Element Ecology & Life History Edition Date: 29Jun1992

Botanical data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs), The North Carolina Botanical Garden, and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References
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  • CLEWELL, ANDRE F. 1985. GUIDE TO THE VASCULAR PLANTS OF THE FLORIDA PANHANDLE. UNIV. PRESSES OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, FL. 605 PP.

  • Chafin, L. G. 2000. Field guide to the rare plants of Florida. Florida Natural Areas Inventory, Tallahassee. [http://www.fnai.org/FieldGuide/]

  • Clewell, A.F. 1985. Guide to vascular plants of the Florida panhandle. Florida State Univ. Press, Tallahassee, Florida. 605 pp.

  • Godfrey, R.K. 1988. Trees, shrubs, and woody vines of northern Florida and adjacent Georgia and Alabama. Univ. Georgia Press, Athens. 734 pp.

  • Godfrey, R.K., and J.W. Wooten. 1981. Aquatic and wetland plants of southeastern United States: Dicotyledons. Univ. Georgia Press, Athens. 933 pp.

  • KRAL, R. 1983.A REPORT ON SOME RARE,THREATENED,OR ENDANGEREDFOREST-RELATED VASCULAR PLANTS OF THE SOUTH.VOL I ISOETACEAETHROUGH EUPHORBIACEAE;VOL II AQUIFOLIACEA THROUGH ASTERACEAE& GLOSSARY.USDA FOREST SERV,SE REG.,ATL,GA. TECH PUBL R8-TP2

  • Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.

  • Kral, R. 1983c. A report on some rare, threatened, or endangered forest-related vascular plants of the South. U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Forest Service Technical Publication R8-TP2, Athens, GA. 1305 pp.

  • RADFORD, A., H. AHLES AND C. BELL. 1968 MANUAL OF THE VASCULAR FLORA OF THE CAROLINAS. THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS CHAPEL HILL. 1183 PP + LXI.

  • Radford, A.E., H.E. Ahles, and C.R. Bell. 1968. Manual of the vascular flora of the Carolinas. Univ. North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, NC. 1183 pp.

  • WARD, D.B. (ED). 1979. RARE AND ENDANGERED BIOTA OF FLORIDA, VOLUME 5: PLANTS. UNIVERSITY PRESSES OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE.

  • WUNDERLIN, RICHARD P. 1982. GUIDE TO THE VASCULAR PLANTS OF CENTRAL FLORIDA. UNIV. PRESSES OF FLA., TAMPA, ST. PETERSBURG, FT. MEYERS, SARASOTA

  • Ward, D.B., ed. 1979. Rare and endangered biota of Florida. Vol. 5: Plants. Univ. Presses of Florida, Gainesville.

  • Wunderlin, R.P. 1982. Guide to the vascular plants of central Florida. Univ. Presses Florida, Gainesville. 472 pp.

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