Gratiola quartermaniae - D. Estes
Quarterman's Hedge-hyssop
Other English Common Names: Limestone Hedge-hyssop
Taxonomic Status: Provisionally accepted
French Common Names: gratiole de Quarterman
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.822055
Element Code: PDSCR0R0D0
Informal Taxonomy: Plants, Vascular - Flowering Plants - Figwort Family
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Plantae Anthophyta Dicotyledoneae Scrophulariales Scrophulariaceae Gratiola
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Concept Reference
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Concept Reference: Estes, D. and R. L. Small. 2007. Two new species of Gratiola (Plantaginaceae) from eastern North America and an updated circumscription for Gratiola neglecta. Journal of the Botanical Research Institute of Texas 1(1): 149-170.
Concept Reference Code: A07EST01HQUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Gratiola quartermaniae
Taxonomic Comments: Newly described in 2007, this species is closely related to Gratiola neglecta (in which this material was formerly included) and Gratiola graniticola (another newly-described species formerly included in G. neglecta). According to Estes and Small (2007), it is distinguished from G. granticola by its longer leaves, longer pedicels that are mostly equal to or shorter than their subtending bracts, larger corollas that usually lack purplish or pinkish coloration and that have a beard of yellow trichomes inside the corolla orifice, bracteoles that are mostly longer than the calyces, larger more ovoid and brownish capsules, larger seeds, and slender-based trichomes. It differs from G. neglecta in having a glabrous midstem; narrower and more falcate, fewer veined and fewer toother leaves that have a larger length to width ratio; and seeds that average longer, thicker and darker (Estes and Small 2007).
Conservation Status
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NatureServe Status

Global Status: G3
Global Status Last Reviewed: 16Aug2016
Global Status Last Changed: 26Jun2009
Ranking Methodology Used: Ranked by inspection
Rounded Global Status: G3 - Vulnerable
Reasons: Estes and Small (2007) state that this newly-described species is most common in the limestone cedar glades of middle Tennessee, where it is known from about 20-30 populations in nine counties. Although it is not particularly rare in Tennessee at this time, the part of the state where this species occurs is developing rapidly and the species' once-abundant glade habitat is increasingly disappearing; monitoring of Tennessee populations is advisable. In the rest of its scattered known range (Alabama, Illinois, Texas, and Ontario), it appears to be quite rare and is restricted to small geographic areas (Estes and Small 2007). There are probably fewer than 50 known presumed extant locations globally and it is unlikely that the species has been significantly overlooked (D. Estes pers. comm. 2009).
Nation: United States
National Status: N3
Nation: Canada
National Status: N2 (06Sep2017)

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
United States Alabama (SNR), Illinois (SNR), Kentucky (S1), Tennessee (SNR), Texas (SNR)
Canada Ontario (S2)

Other Statuses

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent Comments: Most common in the limestone cedar glades of the Interior Low Plateau of Middle Tennessee, northern Alabama, and southern Kentucky. Disjunct to the alvars of southeastern Ontario; to Will County, Illinois; and to the Edward's Plateau of Texas. This pattern of disjunction is unusual, but in each of these areas, the species occurs in similar habitat and always occurs with other calcium-loving species, some of which have similar patterns of disjunction (Estes and Small 2007). Estes and Small (2007) recommend further searches for the species in other regions with calcareous outcrops and prairies, such as the limestone glades of the southern Ridge and Valley of southeastern Tennessee and northwestern Georgia, the Blackbelt prairies of Mississippi and Alabama, the limestone glades of central and western Kentucky, the Ozark glades of southern Missouri and northern Arkansas, and alvar habitats in New York, Michigan, and Ohio. Possible counties where it may be documented in the future include Sumner and Williamson Cos. (and possibly Meigs and Hamilton Cos.), TN; and Marshall, Madison, and Jackson Cos., AL (D. Estes pers. comm. 2009).

Number of Occurrences: 21 - 80
Number of Occurrences Comments: Occurrences of this newly-described species have not yet been mapped in heritage databases, but there are probably fewer than 50 known presumed extant locations globally. In Tennessee, known from approximately 20-30 populations; although the TN geographic range is not expected to expand much with further searching , it is possible that more populations (possibly as many as 50-75 in total) may be found in the counties where currently known (D. Estes pers. comm. 2009). In Alabama, there are about 6-7 known populations; as many as 20-30 may eventually be documented with diligent searching (D. Estes pers. comm. 2009). In Texas, 5 populations have been reported, but 2 of these are more than 50 years old; probably no more than 20 Texas populations will eventually be documented, within a few counties in vicinity of the known sites (D. Estes pers. comm. 2009). In Illinois, restricted range and habitat and only a few populations known (D. Estes pers. comm. 2009). In Kentucky, known only from a single specimen collected in the 1980s; relatively little habitat for the species remains in KY (D. Estes pers. comm. 2009). In Ontario, there are approximately 10-12 documented sites; more than 20 may eventually be found with concerted searching, although some searching (over 3 years) has already been completed with few new sites located (M. Oldham pers. comm. 2009).

Overall Threat Impact Comments: This species is most abundant in Tennessee, and the part of Tennessee where it occurs is developing rapidly; its once-abundant glade habitat is increasingly disappearing (Estes and Small 2007).

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
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Global Range: Most common in the limestone cedar glades of the Interior Low Plateau of Middle Tennessee, northern Alabama, and southern Kentucky. Disjunct to the alvars of southeastern Ontario; to Will County, Illinois; and to the Edward's Plateau of Texas. This pattern of disjunction is unusual, but in each of these areas, the species occurs in similar habitat and always occurs with other calcium-loving species, some of which have similar patterns of disjunction (Estes and Small 2007). Estes and Small (2007) recommend further searches for the species in other regions with calcareous outcrops and prairies, such as the limestone glades of the southern Ridge and Valley of southeastern Tennessee and northwestern Georgia, the Blackbelt prairies of Mississippi and Alabama, the limestone glades of central and western Kentucky, the Ozark glades of southern Missouri and northern Arkansas, and alvar habitats in New York, Michigan, and Ohio. Possible counties where it may be documented in the future include Sumner and Williamson Cos. (and possibly Meigs and Hamilton Cos.), TN; and Marshall, Madison, and Jackson Cos., AL (D. Estes pers. comm. 2009).

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
Color legend for Distribution Map

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States AL, IL, KY, TN, TX
Canada ON

Range Map
No map available.


U.S. Distribution by County Help
State County Name (FIPS Code)
IL Champaign (17019)*, Will (17197)
KY Simpson (21213)
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
U.S. Distribution by Watershed Help
Watershed Region Help Watershed Name (Watershed Code)
05 Barren (05110002)+, Vermilion (05120109)+*
07 Des Plaines (07120004)+
+ Natural heritage record(s) exist for this watershed
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
Ecology & Life History
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Riverine Habitat(s): SPRING/SPRING BROOK
Palustrine Habitat(s): FORESTED WETLAND, HERBACEOUS WETLAND, TEMPORARY POOL
Terrestrial Habitat(s): Barrens, Grassland/herbaceous
Habitat Comments: Limestone or dolomite glades, outcrops and calcareous prairies. In these habitats, predominantly occurs in shallow clayey soils of ephemeral pools, seasonal streambeds, and periodically wet meadows on or immediately adjacent to outcrops; these sites are wet in late winter and early spring but become severely dried out by late spring and early summer. Sites tend to be flat to slightly sloping and relatively open. Rarely occurs in other habitats such as low wet fields, roadside ditches, open wet woods, and marsh edges; however, such populations are always in close proximity to glades. Also sometimes found in disturbed non-outcrop habitats, a pattern similar to limestone glade endemics such as Leavenworthia alabamica, L. crassa, L. torulosa, and Lesquerella lyrata, with which it is often associated in these cases.In central Tennessee and northern Alabama, almost always associated with limestone cedar glade endemics or calciphiles such as Allium cernuum, Carex crawei, Carex granularis, Dalea foliosa, Dalea gattingeri, Eleocharis bifida, Hypericum sphaerocarpum, Isoetes butleri, Juncus filipendulus, Leavenworthia spp., Ludwigia microcarpa, Mecardonia acuminata, Sedum pulchellum, Sporobolus vaginiflorus, and Talinum calcaricum. In areas where this species is disjunct (Ontario, Illinois, Texas), it is assocaited with a number of additional calcium-loving taxa, including a few of those already listed (Estes and Small 2007).
Economic Attributes Not yet assessed
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Management Summary Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Delineation Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Viability
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U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
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Authors/Contributors
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NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Edition Date: 02Jul2009
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Author: Gravuer, K.

Botanical data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs), The North Carolina Botanical Garden, and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References
Help
  • Estes, D. and R. L. Small. 2007. Two new species of Gratiola (Plantaginaceae) from eastern North America and an updated circumscription for Gratiola neglecta. Journal of the Botanical Research Institute of Texas 1(1): 149-170.

  • Estes, D. and R.L. Small. 2007. Two new species of Gratiola (Plantaginaceae) from eastern North American and an updated circumscription for Gratiola neglecta. Journal of the Botanical Research Institute of Texas 1(1): 149 170.

  • Oldham, M.J. 2008b. MNR biologists assist with the description of a new plant species. Ontario Natural Heritage Information Centre Newsletter 13(1): 3. http://nhic.mnr.gov.on.ca/MNR/nhic/documents/newsletter.cfm).

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