Euxoa chimoensis - Hardwick, 1966
a dart moth
Synonym(s): Euxoa macleani chimoensis Hardwick, 1966
Taxonomic Status: Accepted
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.117586
Element Code: IILEYKV0C2
Informal Taxonomy: Animals, Invertebrates - Insects - Butterflies and Moths - Other Moths
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Animalia Mandibulata Insecta Lepidoptera Noctuidae Euxoa
Genus Size: D - Medium to large genus (21+ species)
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Concept Reference
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Concept Reference: Lafontaine, J. D. 1987. Noctuoidea, Noctuidae (Part): Fascicle 27.2: Noctuinae (Part-Euxoa). The Moths of America North of Mexico (Lepidoptera). E. W. Classey Ltd. and R. B. D. Publications, London, England. 237 pp.
Concept Reference Code: B87LAF01EHUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Euxoa macleani chimoensis
Taxonomic Comments: Revised status from Lafontaine and Troubridge (2010). Lafontaine (1987) placed chimoensis as a subspecies of E. macleani.
Conservation Status
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NatureServe Status

Global Status: GU
Global Status Last Reviewed: 17Nov2016
Global Status Last Changed: 17Nov2016
Ranking Methodology Used: Ranked by inspection
Rounded Global Status: GU - Unrankable
Nation: Canada
National Status: NU (17Nov2016)

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
Canada Labrador (SU)

Other Statuses

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent: Unknown
Range Extent Comments: Known only from three specimens from Ft. Chimo in extreme northern Quebec and northern Labrador. Also reported from Manitoba.

Short-term Trend: Unknown

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
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Global Range: (Unknown) Known only from three specimens from Ft. Chimo in extreme northern Quebec and northern Labrador. Also reported from Manitoba.

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.

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Distribution data for U.S. states and Canadian provinces is known to be incomplete or has not been reviewed for this taxon.
Endemism: endemic to a single nation

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
Canada LB

Range Map
No map available.

Ecology & Life History
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General Description: A rather dull pale brown noctuid with typical pattern for genus.Superficially somewhat like the common Euxoa detersa but browner.
Diagnostic Characteristics: All identifications must be confirmed by an expert such as Dr. David Hardwick (who named the taxon) or Dr. J.D. LaFontaine. There is a good illustration of one of the three known specimens in Rockburn and Lafontaine (1976) fig. 82.
Non-Migrant: N
Locally Migrant: N
Long Distance Migrant: N
Habitat Comments: Habitat is completely unknown, but obviously terrestrial. Species of this genus are often limited to specific moisture situations (usually dry) or to specific soil types or edaphic situations (usually sand, sometimes rock outcrops). The later instars usually hide in the soil when not feeding.
Adult Food Habits: Nectarivore
Immature Food Habits: Herbivore
Food Comments: Adults probably take nectar from flowers and may also sip moist soil. Larvae almost certainly eat leaves, and are probably polyphagous. Virtually all EUXOA feed on a variety of plants, although some prefer grasses.
Adult Phenology: Circadian, Nocturnal
Immature Phenology: Crepuscular, Hibernates/aestivates, Nocturnal
Phenology Comments: Only actual information is that both adults were collected in late July. The rest of the account below follows from this and from general knowledge of the genus. The appearance of the species strongly suggests it is nocturnal or crepuscular as an adult. Hibernation is probably as a young larva, but might be in the egg. Either way hibernation would almost certainly be in or at the surface of the soil. Presumably larvae then feed the following year. They probably pupate about early July. It is possible, but does not seem likely, that the larval stage takes two seasons in which case the second winter would be passed in one of the later instars.
Economic Attributes Not yet assessed
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Management Summary Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Delineation
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Group Name: Noctuid Moths (Default)

Use Class: Not applicable
Minimum Criteria for an Occurrence: A location where the species occurs, or has occurred, where there is potential for persistence or regular recurrence. For almost all species the minimum criteria would be an actual specimen associated with suitable habitat, which includes a substantial amount of one or more larval foodplants. For almost all species an occurrence ranked higher than D should contain a persistent viable population or metapopulation.
Mapping Guidance: If the habitat corresponds to a mappable natural community or other feature consider the boundaries of this feature the EO boundaries. In general EOs need not include more than the breeding habitat and a minimum amount of buffer. In general the larval foodplant should be present on most hectares of the habitat treated as suitable. If this is not approximately true then greater care may need to be taken in defining suitable habitat and actual foodplant stands may need to be considered.
Separation Barriers: Unknown, and probably varies with species.
Separation Distance for Unsuitable Habitat: 2 km
Separation Distance for Suitable Habitat: 10 km
Separation Justification: Most noctuids are strong fliers and except for a few bog and other wetland species (not included here) almost all can be collected occasionally one to several kilometers out of habitat, although some average sized species are long distance migrants. Nevertheless most adults probably stay in habitat most or all of their lives. Two kilometers should generally provide some degree of separation but not create a complete lack of gene flow. If the intervening habitat is mostly suitable there is almost no chance (or even known mechanism by which) two collections a few kilometers apart would represent separate populations but some arbitrary figure is needed. Marginal habitat, for example where the foodplant is relatively scarce (but not absent) should generally be treated as suitable habitat in terms of separation distances.
Inferred Minimum Extent of Habitat Use (when actual extent is unknown): 1 km
Inferred Minimum Extent Justification: In practice for species in this group the inferred extent is usually all contiguous or nearly contiguous habitat which will usually be a few tens to hundreds of hectares. Occurrences are always based on populations which will at least over time occupy available habitat and generally will in any given year. However some arbitrary upper limit is needed with species that typically occupy large habitats. Therefore it is suggested that with really large habitats (usually forests, woodland, brushland) IE be capped at 1 km radius. The resulting 400 hectare area would be a fairly small occurrence for most forest or woodland species. Presence should be inferred only in suitable habitat within this radius.
Date: 31Aug2001
Author: Schweitzer, Dale F.
Notes: These Specs should generally be applied to non-forest trifid subfamilies, non-migratory Plusiinae, and many Catocalinae whose larvae are either generalists or feed on one or several widely distributed plants. A few other apparently wide ranging species are included.
Population/Occurrence Viability
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U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
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Authors/Contributors
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NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Edition Date: 31Aug1999
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Author: Schweitzer, D.f.
Element Ecology & Life History Edition Date: 10Oct1995
Element Ecology & Life History Author(s): SCHWEITZER, D.F.

Zoological data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs) and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References
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  • Lafontaine, J. D. 1987. Noctuoidea, Noctuidae (Part): Fascicle 27.2: Noctuinae (Part-Euxoa). The Moths of America North of Mexico (Lepidoptera). E. W. Classey Ltd. and R. B. D. Publications, London, England. 237 pp.

  • Lafontaine, J. D. and J. T. Troubridge. 2010. Two new species of the Euxoa westermanni species-group from Canada (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Noctuinae).  In: B.C. Schmidt  and J.D. Lafontaine (Eds), Contributions to the systematics of New World macro-moths II. ZooKeys 264: 85?123 ZooKeys 39:255-262.

  • Lafontaine, J.D. and B. C. Schmidt. 2010. Annotated check list of the Noctuoidea (Insecta, Lepidoptera) of North America north of Mexico. ZooKeys 40:1-239.

  • Rockburne, E. W., and J. D. LaFontaine. 1976. The cutworm moths of Ontario and Quebec. Research Branch, Canada Department of Agriculture. Publication 1593. 164 pp.

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