Cynanchum laeve - (Michx.) Pers.
Honeyvine
Other Common Names: honeyvine
Synonym(s): Ampelamus albidus (Nutt.) Britt.
Taxonomic Status: Accepted
Related ITIS Name(s): Cynanchum laeve (Michx.) Pers. (TSN 501893)
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.157388
Element Code: PDASC050A0
Informal Taxonomy: Plants, Vascular - Flowering Plants - Dogbane Family
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Plantae Anthophyta Dicotyledoneae Gentianales Apocynaceae Cynanchum
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Concept Reference
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Concept Reference: Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.
Concept Reference Code: B94KAR01HQUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Cynanchum laeve
Conservation Status
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NatureServe Status

Global Status: G5
Global Status Last Reviewed: 13Mar1995
Global Status Last Changed: 11May1985
Rounded Global Status: G5 - Secure
Reasons: Widespread in the United States; often weedy, at least in western portion of its range.
Nation: United States
National Status: N5
Nation: Canada
National Status: NNA (12Oct2016)

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
United States Alabama (SNR), Arkansas (SNR), Delaware (SNA), District of Columbia (SNR), Florida (SNR), Georgia (S3?), Idaho (SNR), Illinois (SNR), Indiana (SNR), Iowa (S3), Kansas (SNR), Kentucky (S5), Louisiana (SNR), Maryland (S5), Mississippi (SNR), Missouri (SNR), Nebraska (SNR), New York (SNA), North Carolina (S1?), Ohio (SNR), Oklahoma (SNR), Pennsylvania (S1), South Carolina (SNR), Tennessee (SNR), Texas (SNR), Virginia (S4S5), West Virginia (S4)
Canada Ontario (SNA)

Other Statuses

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent Comments: Pennsylvania to Indiana, Iowa, eastern Nebraska, south to Georgia, west to Texas.

Number of Occurrences: 81 to >300

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
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Global Range: Pennsylvania to Indiana, Iowa, eastern Nebraska, south to Georgia, west to Texas.

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
Color legend for Distribution Map
NOTE: The distribution shown may be incomplete, particularly for some rapidly spreading exotic species.

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States AL, AR, DC, DEexotic, FL, GA, IA, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MD, MO, MS, NC, NE, NYexotic, OH, OK, PA, SC, TN, TX, VA, WV
Canada ONexotic

Range Map
No map available.


U.S. Distribution by County Help
State County Name (FIPS Code)
PA Lancaster (42071), York (42133)*
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
U.S. Distribution by Watershed Help
Watershed Region Help Watershed Name (Watershed Code)
02 Lower Susquehanna (02050306)+
+ Natural heritage record(s) exist for this watershed
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
Ecology & Life History
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Basic Description: A twining perennial vine of the milkweed family, with milky sap, heart-shaped leaves, and rather bell-shaped whitish flowers.
Technical Description: Vine slender, to 3 m long or more, pubescent in longitudinal strips. Leaves opposite, petiolate, petioles (1-) 3-5 cm long, usually pubescent on one side, blades cordate-ovate, acuminate or acute apically, 2.5-5 (-8) cm long and 2-5 cm across the base, margins entire, surfaces glabrous or, more frequently, short-pubescent along the veins. Flowers in axillary umbels or short racemes, the umbel a little shorter than to a little longer than the petioles; stalks of the umbel and the flower stalks pubescent. Sepals triangular-acute, about 2 mm long, pale along their margins, pubescent at least proximally. Corolla campanulate, white, about 6 mm long, deeply parted, lobes erect at anthesis; corona of 5 membranous, lanceolate, erect segments surpassing the gynostegium and about equaling the corolla lobes, each segment divided to the middle into 2 linear lobes. Follicle lance-attenutate in outline, 5-15 cm long and to 3 cm broad a little above the base. (Godfrey and Wooten 1981).
Diagnostic Characteristics: The cordate leaves distinguish it from C. angustifolium (= C. palustre) and C. scoparium, which have sessile or short-petiolate, linear leaves. The distinctive corona (5-lobed, appearing 10-lobed as each lobe is divided) separates it from C. louiseae (= C. nigrum or Vincetoxicum nigrum), C. rossicum (= C. medium, Vincetoxicum medium, V. hirundinaria), and C. vincetoxicum (= Vincetoxicum hirundinaria), which have the corona with 5 inconspicuous to prominent lobes that are not themselves divided. Distinguished from Matelea spp. by flower color (maroon to yellow-green in Matelea). (Gleason and Cronquist 1991, Godfrey and Wooten 1981, Radford et al. 1968)
Duration: PERENNIAL
Ecology Comments: Often found in disturbed areas (see habitat description).
Terrestrial Habitat(s): Cropland/hedgerow, Forest/Woodland, Grassland/herbaceous, Old field, Woodland - Hardwood
Habitat Comments: Low moist woods; forest margins; thickets; alluvial thickets, woods, and swales; stream banks; riverside thickets; floodplain woods; cultivated fields; roadsides; fence rows; along railroads; disturbed areas. Often weedy. (Correll and Johnston 1970, Fernald 1950, Gleason and Cronquist 1991, Godfrey and Wooten 1981, Great Plains Flora Association 1986, Johnson 1983, Radford et al. 1968, Steyermark 1963) Soils: "silty clay or sand" (Correll and Johnson 1970); sandy, clayey, or rocky calcareous soils" (Great Plains Flora Association 1986).
Economic Attributes
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Economic Uses: FOOD, Honey
Economic Comments: "The plant has been recommended by beekeepers as an excellent honey plant. It is likely to become well established and later behave as a weed, making it difficult to eradicate. In areas where it infests fields, it interferes with crop yields and is considered a more vicious pest than bindweed, and more difficult to get rid of." (Steyermark 1963)
Management Summary Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Delineation Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Viability
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U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
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Authors/Contributors
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NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Edition Date: 13Mar1995
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Author: M.E. Stover, TNC-HO
Element Ecology & Life History Edition Date: 13Mar1995
Element Ecology & Life History Author(s): M.E. STOVER, TNC-HO

Botanical data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs), The North Carolina Botanical Garden, and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References
Help
  • Correll, D.S., and M.C. Johnston. 1970. Manual of the vascular plants of Texas. Texas Research Foundation, Renner. 1881 pp.

  • Deam, C. C. 1940. Flora of Indiana. Division of Forestry, Dept. of Conservation, Indianapolis, Indiana. 1236 pp.

  • Fernald, M. L. 1950. Gray's manual of botany. 8th edition. Corrected printing (1970). D. Van Nostrand Company, New York. 1632 pp.

  • Gleason, H.A., and A. Cronquist. 1991. Manual of vascular plants of northeastern United States and adjacent Canada. New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, New York. 910 pp.

  • Godfrey, R.K., and J.W. Wooten. 1981. Aquatic and wetland plants of southeastern United States: Dicotyledons. Univ. Georgia Press, Athens. 933 pp.

  • Great Plains Flora Association (R.L. McGregor, coordinator; T.M. Barkley, ed., R.E. Brooks and E.K. Schofield, associate eds.). 1986. Flora of the Great Plains. University Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 1392 pp.

  • Johnson, M. F. 1983. Studies in the Flora of Virginia: Asclepiadaceae. Castanea, 48(4): 259-271.

  • Kartesz, J. T., and C. Meacham. 1999. Unpublished review draft of Floristic Synthesis, 10Jun99 and/or 16Jun99. North Carolina Botanical Garden, Chapel Hill.

  • Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.

  • Kartesz, J.T. 1996. Species distribution data at state and province level for vascular plant taxa of the United States, Canada, and Greenland (accepted records), from unpublished data files at the North Carolina Botanical Garden, December, 1996.

  • Radford, A.E., H.E. Ahles, and C.R. Bell. 1968. Manual of the vascular flora of the Carolinas. Univ. North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, NC. 1183 pp.

  • Steyermark, J.A. 1963. Flora of Missouri. Iowa State Univ. Press, Ames. 1728 pp.

  • Swink, F., and G. Wilhelm. 1994. Plants of the Chicago Region. Morton Arboretum. Lisle, Illinois.

  • Zaremba, Robert E. 1991. Corrections to phenology list of April 9, 1991.

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