Cymopterus beckii - Welsh & Goodrich
Pinnate Spring-parsley
Other English Common Names: Featherleaf Spring-parsley
Other Common Names: featherleaf springparsley
Taxonomic Status: Accepted
Related ITIS Name(s): Cymopterus beckii Welsh & Goodrich (TSN 501875)
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.153885
Element Code: PDAPI0U130
Informal Taxonomy: Plants, Vascular - Flowering Plants - Carrot Family
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Plantae Anthophyta Dicotyledoneae Apiales Apiaceae Cymopterus
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Concept Reference
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Concept Reference: Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.
Concept Reference Code: B94KAR01HQUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Cymopterus beckii
Conservation Status
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NatureServe Status

Global Status: G2G3
Global Status Last Reviewed: 16Oct2013
Global Status Last Changed: 16Oct2013
Ranking Methodology Used: Ranked by calculator
Rounded Global Status: G2 - Imperiled
Reasons: Found in two disjunct areas of southeastern Utah and one small area in Navajo County, Arizona. According to AZ Grank Review Team (6/27/2012), this plant is common in Utah but rare in Arizona where populations are small. The Utah Native Plant Society reported that recent surveys by the BLM-MPS team have greatly increased the number of known individuals (over 30,000).
Nation: United States
National Status: N2N3

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
United States Arizona (S1), Navajo Nation (S1), Utah (S1)

Other Statuses

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent Comments: In Utah, known from two disjunct areas approximately 75 miles removed from each other; one on the southwest slopes of the Abajo Mountains, San Juan county, and the other in and near Capitol Reef National Park, Wayne county. In Arizona, two populations ranging about 3 sq km, on the Navajo Nation.

Area of Occupancy: 3-25 4-km2 grid cells
Area of Occupancy Comments: Occupies approximately 1.13 sq km in Arizona.

Number of Occurrences: 6 - 20
Number of Occurrences Comments: In Utah, nine survey-based element occurrences, and six collection-based occurrences. In Arizona, two collection based element occurrences on Navajo Nation.

Population Size Comments: Based on surveys conducted between 1999 and 2002, there are estimated to be approximately 30,000-35,000 individuals in the Wayne County, Utah portion of the range (D. Clark, pers. comm., 2011). According to Utah Native Plant Society (Laurenzi and Spence, 2012), "Recent surveys by BLM-MPS team in central UT have greatly increased number of known individuals (over 30,000)." In addition, John Spence reports common in Utah but rare in Arizona. No population estimates available for the two EOs in Arizona that occur on the Navajo Nation.

Number of Occurrences with Good Viability/Integrity: Unknown

Overall Threat Impact: Medium - low
Overall Threat Impact Comments: Possibly some visitor impacts in the form of trampling at Capitol Reef National Park, Utah. The Forest Service EOs in Utah are in little used areas. There are a few reports of disturbance by visitors and grazing but threats appear to be relatively low (Clark 2002; EO data in the NatureServe central database as of July 2011). Threats unknown for the Arizona population; population is located in remote canyons on the Navajo Nation.

Short-term Trend: Relatively Stable (<=10% change)
Short-term Trend Comments: Trend information unknown for both Arizona and Utah populations, but Utah population seems to be stable. In Capitol Reef National Park, trend appears to be fairly stable; after a flash flood, plants in slot canyons came back the following year (D. Clark, pers. comm., 2011).

Long-term Trend: Unknown

Environmental Specificity: Moderate. Generalist or community with some key requirements scarce.
Environmental Specificity Comments: Sand or stony crevices, ledges, and cliffs in canyon bottoms of Navajo sandstone, in pinyon-juniper mountain brush communities. Also found in ponderosa pine-manzanita, conifer-oak, and Douglas fir communities. Elevations between 1952-2012 m (6,400-6,600) feet in Arizona. In Utah, occurs between 1700-2635 m (5,5577-8,645 ft).

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
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Global Range: In Utah, known from two disjunct areas approximately 75 miles removed from each other; one on the southwest slopes of the Abajo Mountains, San Juan county, and the other in and near Capitol Reef National Park, Wayne county. In Arizona, two populations ranging about 3 sq km, on the Navajo Nation.

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
Color legend for Distribution Map

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States AZ, NN, UT

Range Map
No map available.


U.S. Distribution by County Help
State County Name (FIPS Code)
AZ Navajo (04017)
UT San Juan (49037), Wayne (49055)
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
U.S. Distribution by Watershed Help
Watershed Region Help Watershed Name (Watershed Code)
14 Upper Colorado-Kane Springs (14030005)+, Fremont (14070003)+, Lower San Juan-Four Corners (14080201)+, Chinle (14080204)+
+ Natural heritage record(s) exist for this watershed
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
Ecology & Life History
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Basic Description: A perennial herb, up to 4 dm tall, producing bright yellow flowers in compact clusters in the spring.
Duration: PERENNIAL
Terrestrial Habitat(s): Bare rock/talus/scree, Forest - Conifer, Forest - Mixed, Forest/Woodland, Woodland - Conifer, Woodland - Mixed
Habitat Comments: Sandy or stony crevices, ledges, and cliff bases on Navajo Sandstone in pinyon-juniper, mountain brush, and ponderosa pine-manzanita conifer-oak, and Douglas fir communities between 1700-2635 m elevation.
Economic Attributes Not yet assessed
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Management Summary
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Stewardship Overview: Revisit sites to confirm status and low level of threats. Survey for undiscovered populations.
Population/Occurrence Delineation
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Minimum Criteria for an Occurrence: A natural occurrence of one or more plants.
Separation Barriers: EOs are separated by either: 1 kilometer or more across unsuitable habitat or altered and unsuitable areas; or 2 kilometers or more across apparently suitable habitat not known to be occupied.
Separation Distance for Unsuitable Habitat: 1 km
Separation Distance for Suitable Habitat: 2 km
Separation Justification: The rationale for this large a separation distance across suitable but apparently unoccupied habitat is that it is likely additional research will find this habitat to be occupied. It can often be assumed that apparently unconnected occurrences will eventually be found to be more closely connected. No information on mobility of pollen and propagules is available on which to base the separation distance for this species.
Date: 08May2002
Author: Ben Franklin
Population/Occurrence Viability
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Excellent Viability: SIZE: 500 or more individuals (based on available EOR data). CONDITION: The occurrence has an excellent likelihood of long-term viability as evidenced by the presence of multiple age classes and evidence of flowering and fruiting, indicating that the reproductive mechanisms are intact. This occurrence should be in a high-quality site with less than 1% cover of exotic plant species and/or no significant anthropogenic disturbance. LANDSCAPE CONTEXT: The occurrence is surrounded by an area that is unfragmented and includes the ecological processes needed to sustain this species.
Good Viability: SIZE: 200 to 499 or more individuals (based on available EOR data). CONDITION: 200 to 499 or more individuals (based on available EOR data). LANDSCAPE CONTEXT: The occurrence should have a good likelihood of long-term viability as evidenced by the presence of multiple age classes and evidence of flowering and fruiting, indicating that the reproductive mechanisms are intact. Anthropogenic disturbance within the occurrence is minimal. If exotic species are present, they comprise less than 10% of the total ground cover.
Fair Viability: SIZE: The surrounding landscape should contain the ecological processes needed to sustain the occurrence but may be fragmented and/or impacted by humans. CONDITION: 20 to 199 individuals (based on available EOR data). LANDSCAPE CONTEXT: The occurrence may be less productive than the above situations, but is still viable, with multiple age classes and evidence of flowering and fruiting, indicating that the reproductive mechanisms are intact. The occupied habitat is somewhat degraded (exotic plant species make up between 10-50% of the total ground cover and/or there is a moderate level of anthropogenic disturbance).
Poor Viability: SIZE: There may be significant human disturbance, but the ecological processes needed to sustain the species are still intact. CONDITION: Less than 20 individuals (based on available EOR data). LANDSCAPE CONTEXT: Little or no evidence of successful reproduction is observed (poor seedling recruitment, no flowering or fruiting observed, or poor age class distribution). Exotic plant species make up greater than 50% of the total ground cover, and/or there is a significant level of human disturbance.
Justification: SIZE: Large populations in high quality sites are presumed to contain a high degree of genetic variability, to have a low susceptibility to the effects of inbreeding depression, and to be relatively resilient. EOs not meeting "C"-rank criteria are likely to have a very high probability of inbreeding depression and extirpation due to natural stochastic processes and/or occur in degraded habitat with low long-term potential for survival. ONDITION: Large populations in high quality sites are presumed to contain a high degree of genetic variability, to have a low susceptibility to the effects of inbreeding depression, and to be relatively resilient. EOs not meeting "C"-rank criteria are likely to have a very high probability of inbreeding depression and extirpation due to natural stochastic processes and/or occur in degraded habitat with low long-term potential for survival. LANDSCAPE CONTEXT: Large populations in high quality sites are presumed to contain a high degree of genetic variability, to have a low susceptibility to the effects of inbreeding depression, and to be relatively resilient. EOs not meeting "C"-rank criteria are likely to have a very high probability of inbreeding depression and extirpation due to natural stochastic processes and/or occur in degraded habitat with low long-term potential for survival.
Key for Ranking Species Element Occurrences Using the Generic Approach (2008).
U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
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Authors/Contributors
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NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Edition Date: 26Jun2012
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Author: B. Franklin, rev. B. Franklin (1996), rev. S Schuetze (2011), rev. S Schuetze (2012)
Management Information Edition Date: 05Aug2011
Management Information Edition Author: Tomaino, A.
Element Ecology & Life History Author(s): rev. S. Schuetze (2011-07-28)

Botanical data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs), The North Carolina Botanical Garden, and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References
Help
  • Albee, B.J., L.M. Shultz, and S. Goodrich. 1988. Atlas of the vascular plants of Utah. Utah Museum Natural History Occasional Publication 7, Salt Lake City, Utah. 670 pp.

  • Anderson, J. 1987. From the files of John Anderson, USFWS, Salt Lake City, Nov. 18, 1987.

  • Anderson, John L. 1986. Memorandum - 1985 data on candidate T/E plants in Capitol Reef National Park. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Office.

  • Anonymous. 19??. Photocopy of 1:62500 scale map - Capitol Reef National Monument, Waterpocket Fold and Fruita area.

  • Anonymous. No Date. List of collections of sensitive species in Bureau of Land Management Moab District.

  • Clark, D. 1997. Progress report-July 1997: "Expedition Into The Parks" rare plant survey at Capitol Reef National Park.

  • Clark, D. 1999. Rare plant observation accounts for Hymenoxys acaulis var. nana, Erigeron maguirei, Townsendia aprica, Gilia caespitosa, Thelesperma subnudum var. alpinum, Cymopterus beckii, Schoenocrambe [sic] barnebyi, Salix arizonica, and Pediocactus winkleri/Pediocactus despainii. Dated April 15, 1999 to August 27 1999.

  • Clark, D.J. 1998. 1998 field survey results for Winkler and San Rafael Cactus. Capitol Reef National Park & Bureau of Land Management.

  • Franklin, M. A. 1991. Report for 1990 Challenge Cost Share Project, Manti-LaSal National Forest. Target species: Cymopterus beckii Welsh & Goodrich (pinnate parsley) and Erigeron kachinensis Welsh & Moore (kachina daisy). Utah Natural Heritage Program, Department of Natural Resources. Unpublished report on file Utah Natural Heritage Program, Salt Lake City, Utah. Pp. 1-9 + appendices.

  • Franklin, M. A. 1993. Survey report on Cymopterus beckii Welsh & Goodrich and Erigeron kachinensis Welsh & Moore. Prepared by Utah Natural Heritage Program, Department of Natural Resources. Unpublished report on file Utah Natural Heritage Program, Salt Lake City, Utah. Pp. 1-9 + appendices.

  • Franklin, M.A. 1992. Survey report on Cymopterus beckii Welsh & Goodrich and Erigeron kachinensis Welsh & Moore. 1992 Challenge Cost Share Project, Utah Natural Heritage Program and Manti-La Sal National Forest, U.S. Forest Service. Unpublished report on file Utah Natural Heritage Program, Salt Lake City. 10 pp. + appendices.

  • Heil, K. 1989. Endangered, threatened, rare and other plants of concern at Capitol Reef National Park, Utah.

  • Heil, K. D. 1987. A vegetation study of Capitol Reef National Park, conducted for the National Park Service. Final progress report for 1986. San Juan College, Farmington, New Mexico. 9 pp.

  • Heil, K. D., D. Hyder, R. Melton, and R. Fleming. 1991. The threatened/endangered flora of the San Juan Resource Area. Contract #J910C10022. Pp. 1-36 + appendices.

  • Heil, K. D., J. M. Porter, R. Fleming, and W. H. Romme. 1993. Vascular flora and vegetation of Capitol Reef National Park. Technical report NPS/NAUCARE/NRTR-93/01. 82 pp.

  • Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.

  • Thompson, B. 1991. Information on sensitive species of the Manti La-Sal National Forest and elsewhere.

  • Tuhy, J and B. Franklin. 1992. Work Plan for 1992 Challenge Cost Share Project Manti-LaSal National Forest. Target species - Cymopterus beckii. Utah Natural Heritage Program.

  • Wells, T. 1981. Population ecology of terrestrial orchids. In H. Synge, editor, The biological aspects of rare plant conservation. John Wiley and Sons, New York, NY. 181-195 p.

  • Welsh, S. L. 1981. New taxa of western plants-in tribute. Brittonia 33(3): 294-303.

  • Welsh, S.L., N.D. Atwood, S. Goodrich, and L.C. Higgins (eds.) 1993. A Utah flora. 2nd edition. Brigham Young Univ., Provo, Utah. 986 pp.

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