Corbicula fluminea - (Muller, 1774)
Asiatic Clam
Taxonomic Status: Accepted
Related ITIS Name(s): Corbicula fluminea (O. F. Müller, 1774) (TSN 81387)
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.109333
Element Code: IMBIV48010
Informal Taxonomy: Animals, Invertebrates - Mollusks - Other Mollusks
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Animalia Mollusca Bivalvia Veneroida Corbiculidae Corbicula
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Concept Reference
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Concept Reference: Turgeon, D.D., J.F. Quinn, Jr., A.E. Bogan, E.V. Coan, F.G. Hochberg, W.G. Lyons, P.M. Mikkelsen, R.J. Neves, C.F.E. Roper, G. Rosenberg, B. Roth, A. Scheltema, F.G. Thompson, M. Vecchione, and J.D. Williams. 1998. Common and scientific names of aquatic invertebrates from the United States and Canada: Mollusks. 2nd Edition. American Fisheries Society Special Publication 26, Bethesda, Maryland: 526 pp.
Concept Reference Code: B98TUR01EHUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Corbicula fluminea
Conservation Status
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NatureServe Status

Global Status: G5
Global Status Last Reviewed: 08Feb2007
Global Status Last Changed: 21Mar2002
Rounded Global Status: G5 - Secure
Reasons: This species is widespread and has invaded many countries globally.
Nation: United States
National Status: NNA (21Oct1991)
Nation: Canada
National Status: NNA (01Aug2017)

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
United States Alabama (SNA), Arkansas (SNA), Colorado (SNA), Connecticut (SNA), Delaware (SNA), District of Columbia (SNA), Georgia (SNA), Hawaii (SNA), Idaho (SNA), Illinois (SNA), Indiana (SNA), Iowa (SNA), Kansas (SNA), Kentucky (SNA), Louisiana (SNA), Maryland (SNA), Massachusetts (SNA), Michigan (SNA), Minnesota (SNA), Mississippi (SNA), Missouri (SNA), Nebraska (SNA), New Jersey (SNA), New York (SNA), North Carolina (SNA), Pennsylvania (SNA), Rhode Island (SNA), South Carolina (SNA), Texas (SNA), Utah (SNA), Vermont (SNA), Virginia (SNA), Washington (SNA), West Virginia (SNA), Wisconsin (SNA)
Canada British Columbia (SNA), Ontario (SNA)

Other Statuses

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent: >2,500,000 square km (greater than 1,000,000 square miles)

Area of Occupancy: >12,500 4-km2 grid cells
Area of Occupancy Comments:  

Number of Occurrences: > 300
Number of Occurrences Comments: One of the farthest northerly records is in the Clinton River in southeastern Michigan from before 1990 (Janech and Hunter, 1995). This species has been documented in Colorado (Cordeiro and MacWilliams, 1999) and is expanding in that state (Sovell and Guralnick, 2005). Recently it has been found in a number of permanent water bodies at the central and western regions of Cuba (Pointier et al., 2005). This species is apparently rare in the Fox River basin in Illinois and Wisconsin as a recent comprehensive survey found it alive at only a single tributary in Illinois (none in Wisconsin portion) (Schanzle et al., 2004). It occurs throughout the Rough River (Green basin), Kentucky (Gordon, 1991). In Alabama it occurs in most of the statre and the Mobile Basin except for the Blackwater, Perdido and Escatawpa Rivers and some direct tributaries of Mobile Bay (Williams et al., 2008; McGregor et al., 1999). Pearce and Evans (2008) documented it in Plummers Island (Middle Potomac River system), Maryland. Lysne and Clark (2009) found it in the Bruneau River (survey area from Snake River confluence upstream to Hot Creek- 41 km) in Idaho.

Population Size: >1,000,000 individuals

Number of Occurrences with Good Viability/Integrity: Very many (>125)

Overall Threat Impact: Low

Short-term Trend: Increase of >10%

Long-term Trend: Increase of >25%

Environmental Specificity: Broad. Generalist or community with all key requirements common.
Environmental Specificity Comments: This species can survive in almost any freshwater environment, including brackish and estuarine waters, that is permanent (Carlton, 1992). In a study of the relationships of 12 environmental variables to density oand biomass of Corbicula fluminea, higher density and biomass were found to be correlated to where substrate was > 40% fine sand, < 45% silt, and < 8% organic content (Cooper, 2007).

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
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Global Range: (>2,500,000 square km (greater than 1,000,000 square miles))  

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.

Map unavailable!:
Distribution data for U.S. states and Canadian provinces is known to be incomplete or has not been reviewed for this taxon.
Endemism: occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States ALexotic, ARexotic, COexotic, CTexotic, DCexotic, DEexotic, GAexotic, HIexotic, IAexotic, IDexotic, ILexotic, INexotic, KSexotic, KYexotic, LAexotic, MAexotic, MDexotic, MIexotic, MNexotic, MOexotic, MSexotic, NCexotic, NEexotic, NJexotic, NYexotic, PAexotic, RIexotic, SCexotic, TXexotic, UTexotic, VAexotic, VTexotic, WAexotic, WIexotic, WVexotic
Canada BCexotic, ONexotic

Range Map
No map available.


U.S. Distribution by County Help
State County Name (FIPS Code)
ID Elmore (16039), Gooding (16047), Idaho (16049), Nez Perce (16069), Owyhee (16073)
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
U.S. Distribution by Watershed Help
Watershed Region Help Watershed Name (Watershed Code)
17 Upper Snake-Rock (17040212)+, C. J. Idaho (17050101)+, Hells Canyon (17060101)+, Lower Snake-Asotin (17060103)+
+ Natural heritage record(s) exist for this watershed
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
Ecology & Life History
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Habitat Type: Freshwater
Non-Migrant: N
Locally Migrant: N
Long Distance Migrant: N
Estuarine Habitat(s): Bay/sound, River mouth/tidal river
Riverine Habitat(s): BIG RIVER, CREEK, High gradient, Low gradient, MEDIUM RIVER, Moderate gradient
Lacustrine Habitat(s): Shallow water
Special Habitat Factors: Benthic
Habitat Comments: This species can survive in almost any freshwater environment, including brackish and estuarine waters, that is permanent (Carlton, 1992). In a study of the relationships of 12 environmental variables to density oand biomass of Corbicula fluminea, higher density and biomass were found to be correlated to where substrate was > 40% fine sand, < 45% silt, and < 8% organic content (Cooper, 2007).
Economic Attributes Not yet assessed
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Management Summary Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Delineation Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Viability
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U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
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Authors/Contributors
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NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Edition Date: 22Oct2007
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Author: Cordeiro, J.
Element Ecology & Life History Edition Date: 22Oct2007
Element Ecology & Life History Author(s): Cordeiro, J.

Zoological data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs) and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References
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  • Becker, A.J., R. Gauza, and J.A. Smith. 2006. A summary of Freshwater Mussel data collected by the Maryland Biological Stream Survey 1995-2006. MD DNR-MBSS, Annapolis. 28 pp.

  • Burch, T.A. 1995. Corbicula fluminea Muller (Mollusca: Bivalvia) established on Oahu. Bishop Musuem Occasional Papers, 42: 58.

  • Carlton, J.T. 1992. Introduced marine and estuarine mollusks of North America: and end-of-the-20th century perspective. Journal of Shellfish Research 11(2):489-505.

  • Cooper, J.E. 2007. Corbicula fluminea (Asian clam) in the Roanoke River, North Carolina: a stressed population? Southeastern Naturalist, 6(3): 413-434.

  • Cordeiro, J.R. and S. MacWilliams. 1999. Occurrence of the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea (Muller, 1774) (Bivalvia; Sphaeriacea; Corbiculidae) in Colorado. The Veliger, 42(3): 278-288.

  • Gordon, M.E. 1985. Mollusca of Frog Bayou, Arkansas. The Nautilus, 99(1): 6-9.

  • Gordon, M.E. 1991. Aquatic mollusca of the Rough River in the vicinity of the Fort Hartford Mine site, Ohio County, Kentucky. Unpublished final report for Environmental and Safety Designs, Memphis, Tennessee, 6 July 1991. 10 pp.

  • Howells, R.G., J.B. Wise, A.Y. Karatayev, and L.E. Burlakova. 2004. New "old records" of Asian clam Corbicula fluminea in Texas. Ellipsaria 6(3): 11-12.

  • Janech, M.. and R.D. Hunter. 1995. Corbicula fluminea in a Michigan river: implications for low temperature tolerance. Malacological Review, 28: 119-124.

  • Karatayev, A.Y., R.G. Howells, L.E. Burlakova, and B.D. Sewell. 2005. History of spread and current distribution of Corbicula fluminea (Muller) in Texas. Journal of Shellfish Research 24(2): 553-559.

  • Long, S. J., and S. Bunnett, eds. 1985. Suggested draft list of common names for mollusks occurring from America north of Mexico, American Malacological Union. Shells and Sea Life 17(2):48-85.

  • Lysne, S.J. and W.H. Clark. 2009. Mollusc survey of the lower Bruneau River, Owyhee County, Idaho, U.S.A. American Malacological Bulletin 27:167-172.

  • MACIVOR, L. ET AL. 1995. FRESHWATER MUSSEL SURVEYS OF THE C& O CANAL NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK AND POTOMAC RIVER IN WASHINGTON, FREDERICK, AND MONTGOMERY COUNTIES IN MARYLAND. MARYLAND NATURAL HERITAGE PROGRAM.

  • Mackie, G. 2014. General Status rank assessment of freshwater molluscs of British Columbia. Prepared for Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada. Gatineau, PQ.

  • McGregor, S.W., T.E. Shepard, T.D. Richardson, and J.F. Fitzpatrick, Jr. 1999. A survey of the primary tributaries of the Alabama and Lower Tombigbee rivers for freshwater mussels, snails, and crayfish. Geological Survey of Alabama, Circular 196. 29 pp.

  • Pearce, T.A. and R. Evans. 2008. Freshwater Mollusca of Plummers Island, Maryland. Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington, 15: 20-30.

  • Pointier, J.-P., M. Yong, and A. Gutierrez. 2005. Guide to the Freshwater Molluscs of Cuba. ConchBooks: Hackenheim, Germany. 120 pp.

  • Schanzle, R.W., G.W. Kruse, J.A. Kath, R.A. Klocek, and K.S. Cummings. 2004. The freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionidae) of the Fox River basin, Illinois and Wisconsin. Illinois Natural History Biological Notes, 141: 1-35.

  • Sovell, J.R. and R. Guralnick. 2005. Montane mollusc and crustacean survey of western Colorado. Final report to the Colorado Division of Wildlife, Colorado. 65 pp.

  • Tiemann, J.S.. 2006. Freshwater mussel (Bivalvia: Unionidae) survey of the Wakurusa River basin, Kansas. Transaction of the Kansas Academy of Science, 109(3/4): 221-230.

  • Turgeon, D.D., J.F. Quinn, Jr., A.E. Bogan, E.V. Coan, F.G. Hochberg, W.G. Lyons, P.M. Mikkelsen, R.J. Neves, C.F.E. Roper, G. Rosenberg, B. Roth, A. Scheltema, F.G. Thompson, M. Vecchione, and J.D. Williams. 1998. Common and scientific names of aquatic invertebrates from the United States and Canada: Mollusks. 2nd Edition. American Fisheries Society Special Publication 26, Bethesda, Maryland: 526 pp.

  • Vaughn, C.C. and C.C. Hakenkamp. 2001. The functional role of burrowing bivalves in freshwater ecosystems. Freshwater Biology, 46: 1431-1446.

  • Werner, S. and K.-O. Rothhaupt. 2007. Effects of the invasive bivalve Corbicula fluminea on settleing juveniles and other benthic taxa. Journal of the North American Benthological Society, 26(4): 673-680.

  • Williams, J. D., A. E. Bogan, and J. T Garner. 2008. Freshwater mussels of Alabama & the Mobile Basin in Georgia, Mississippi, & Tennessee. University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa, Alabama. 908 pages.

  • Williams, J.D., A.E. Bogan, and J.T. Garner. 2008. Freshwater Mussels of Alabama & the Mobile Basin in Georgia, Mississippi & Tennessee. University of Alabama Press: Tuscaloosa, Alabama. 908 pp.

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