Caecidotea hobbsi - Maloney, 1939
Hobbs Cave Isopod
Other English Common Names: Hobbs cave isopod
Taxonomic Status: Accepted
Related ITIS Name(s): Caecidotea hobbsi (Maloney, 1939) (TSN 92741)
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.110443
Element Code: ICMAL01110
Informal Taxonomy: Animals, Invertebrates - Crustaceans - Isopods
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Animalia Crustacea Malacostraca Isopoda Asellidae Caecidotea
Genus Size: D - Medium to large genus (21+ species)
Check this box to expand all report sections:
Concept Reference
Help
Concept Reference: Maloney, J.O. 1939. A new cave isopod from Florida. Proceedings of the United States National Museum, 86(3057): 457-459.
Concept Reference Code: A39MAL01EHUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Caecidotea hobbsi
Conservation Status
Help

NatureServe Status

Global Status: G2G3
Global Status Last Reviewed: 16Apr2014
Global Status Last Changed: 08Aug2007
Rounded Global Status: G2 - Imperiled
Reasons: This species has a mall range and relatively few known occurrences. As a cave species, it is probably quite fragile and sensitive to changes in habitat, especially water quality.
Nation: United States
National Status: N2N3 (08Aug2007)

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
United States Florida (S2), Georgia (SNR)

Other Statuses

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent: 250-20,000 square km (about 100-8000 square miles)
Range Extent Comments: Reported from aquatic caves in Alachua and Marion counties in the northern peninsula, and from caves along the Chipola and Choctawhatchee river systems in the Panhandle of Florida, USA (assuming correct species assignment); also known from a crayfish burrow in Calhoun County, Florida, and from a spring at Emory University, DeKalb County, Georgia, USA. Unstudied cave asselids, possibly of this species, are known from several other counties in Florida.

Area of Occupancy: 26-12,500 4-km2 grid cells
Area of Occupancy Comments:  

Number of Occurrences: 1 - 20
Number of Occurrences Comments: Known from more than a dozen sites, although this assumes that records along the Chipola and Choctawhatchee river systems represent this species. One record is from Georgia, and the remainder are from northern Florida, USA.

Population Size: 1000 to >1,000,000 individuals
Population Size Comments: Not known to be common anywhere.

Number of Occurrences with Good Viability/Integrity: None to few (0-12)
Viability/Integrity Comments: Because long-term and quantitative data are minimal or non-existent for most troglobitic crustaceans such as this species, there are no specific criteria by which to define a good element occurrence. In lieu of such measures, an occurrence that is observed persistently across many years, that seems to support a large population based on sightings, and that inhabits a site facing no immediate threats will be considered good.

Overall Threat Impact Comments: Presumably sensitive to degradation of aquifers (pollution), alteration (especially reduction) of detrital flow, and saltwater intrusion that may accompany excessive water withdrawal (for agriculture, industry, and human consumption) or sea level rise.

Short-term Trend: Unknown

Long-term Trend: Unknown

Intrinsic Vulnerability: Highly vulnerable
Intrinsic Vulnerability Comments: As a cave species dependent upon detrital flow as well as the quantity and quality of water in the aquifer, it is presumably delicate.

Environmental Specificity: Very narrow. Specialist or community with key requirements scarce.

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Inventory Needs: General inventory of populations range-wide. For each population, record geographic extent, population demographics and densities, types and levels of threats, and kind and degree of protection if any.

Protection Needs: Legal protection (by acquisition and/or perpetual conservation easement) of at least some occurrences, including substantial buffer areas. Consider state and potentially federal listing.

Distribution
Help
Global Range: (250-20,000 square km (about 100-8000 square miles)) Reported from aquatic caves in Alachua and Marion counties in the northern peninsula, and from caves along the Chipola and Choctawhatchee river systems in the Panhandle of Florida, USA (assuming correct species assignment); also known from a crayfish burrow in Calhoun County, Florida, and from a spring at Emory University, DeKalb County, Georgia, USA. Unstudied cave asselids, possibly of this species, are known from several other counties in Florida.

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces
Color legend for Distribution Map
Endemism: endemic to a single nation

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States FL, GA

Range Map
No map available.


U.S. Distribution by County Help
State County Name (FIPS Code)
FL Alachua (12001), Calhoun (12013), Jackson (12063), Washington (12133)
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
U.S. Distribution by Watershed Help
Watershed Region Help Watershed Name (Watershed Code)
03 Oklawaha (03080102)+, Waccasassa (03110101)+, Chipola (03130012)+, Lower Choctawhatchee (03140203)+
+ Natural heritage record(s) exist for this watershed
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
Ecology & Life History
Help
Basic Description: Hobbs' cave isopod
Habitat Type: Freshwater
Non-Migrant: N
Locally Migrant: N
Long Distance Migrant: N
Subterranean Habitat(s): Subaquatic
Special Habitat Factors: Subterranean obligate
Habitat Comments: Phreatobitic, living in fresh water that is held in interstitial spaces between particles of soil or rock. Most records are from subterranean waters, either cave pools or wells that intersect caves. At one location, occupied shallow (1m) water on decaying wood near sinkhole entrances. One specimen taken from a crayfish burrow.
Economic Attributes Not yet assessed
Help
Management Summary
Help
Biological Research Needs: Most aspects of its biology require study. Studies of life history, fecundity, and precise environmental needs would be valuable. Determine population responses to disturbances such as pollution of groundwater and alterations in surface water and detrital flow. Systematic studies of cave isopods from elsewhere in Florida to determine if these represent the same or different species.
Population/Occurrence Delineation Not yet assessed
Help
Population/Occurrence Viability
Help
Justification: Use the Generic Element Occurrence Rank Specifications (2008).
Key for Ranking Species Element Occurrences Using the Generic Approach (2008).
U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
Help
Authors/Contributors
Help
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Edition Date: 16Apr2014
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Author: Jackson, D. R. (2014, 2006)
Element Ecology & Life History Edition Date: 09Apr1999

Zoological data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs) and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References
Help
  • Deyrup, M. and R. Franz. 1994. Rare and Endangered Biota of Florida, Volume IV. Invertebrates. University Press of Florida: Gainesville, Florida. 798 pp.

  • Franz, R., J. Bauer, and T. Morris. 1994. Review of biologically significant caves and their faunas in Florida and south Georgia. Brimleyana 20:1-109.

  • Maloney, J.O. 1939. A new cave isopod from Florida. Proceedings of the United States National Museum, 86(3057): 457-459.

  • McLaughlin, P.A., D.K. Camp, M.V. Angel, E.L. Bousfield, P. Brunel, R.C. Brusca, D. Cadien, A.C. Cohen, K. Conlan, L.G. Eldredge, D.L. Felder, J.W. Goy, T. Haney, B. Hann, R.W. Heard, E.A. Hendrycks, H.H. Hobbs III, J.R. Holsinger, B. Kensley, D.R. Laubitz, S.E. LeCroy, R. Lemaitre, R.F. Maddocks, J.W. Martin, P. Mikkelsen, E. Nelson, W.A. Newman, R.M. Overstreet, W.J. Poly, W.W. Price, J.W. Reid, A. Robertson, D.C. Rogers, A. Ross, M. Schotte, F. Schram, C. Shih, L. Watling, G.D.F. Wilson, and D.D. Turgeon. 2005. Common and scientific names of aquatic invertebrates from the United States and Canada: Crustaceans. American Fisheries Society Special Publication 31: 545 pp.

  • Walsh, S.J. 2001. Freshwater macrofauna of Florida karst habitats. Pages 78-88 in E. Kuniansky (ed.). U.S. Geological Survey Karst Interest Group Proceedings, St. Petersburg, Florida, February 13-16, 2001, USGS Water-Resources Investigations Report 01-4011.

Use Guidelines & Citation

Use Guidelines and Citation

The Small Print: Trademark, Copyright, Citation Guidelines, Restrictions on Use, and Information Disclaimer.

Note: All species and ecological community data presented in NatureServe Explorer at http://explorer.natureserve.org were updated to be current with NatureServe's central databases as of November 2016.
Note: This report was printed on

Trademark Notice: "NatureServe", NatureServe Explorer, The NatureServe logo, and all other names of NatureServe programs referenced herein are trademarks of NatureServe. Any other product or company names mentioned herein are the trademarks of their respective owners.

Copyright Notice: Copyright © 2017 NatureServe, 4600 N. Fairfax Dr., 7th Floor, Arlington Virginia 22203, U.S.A. All Rights Reserved. Each document delivered from this server or web site may contain other proprietary notices and copyright information relating to that document. The following citation should be used in any published materials which reference the web site.

Citation for data on website including State Distribution, Watershed, and Reptile Range maps:
NatureServe. 2017. NatureServe Explorer: An online encyclopedia of life [web application]. Version 7.1. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia. Available http://explorer.natureserve.org. (Accessed:

Citation for Bird Range Maps of North America:
Ridgely, R.S., T.F. Allnutt, T. Brooks, D.K. McNicol, D.W. Mehlman, B.E. Young, and J.R. Zook. 2003. Digital Distribution Maps of the Birds of the Western Hemisphere, version 1.0. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Acknowledgement Statement for Bird Range Maps of North America:
"Data provided by NatureServe in collaboration with Robert Ridgely, James Zook, The Nature Conservancy - Migratory Bird Program, Conservation International - CABS, World Wildlife Fund - US, and Environment Canada - WILDSPACE."

Citation for Mammal Range Maps of North America:
Patterson, B.D., G. Ceballos, W. Sechrest, M.F. Tognelli, T. Brooks, L. Luna, P. Ortega, I. Salazar, and B.E. Young. 2003. Digital Distribution Maps of the Mammals of the Western Hemisphere, version 1.0. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Acknowledgement Statement for Mammal Range Maps of North America:
"Data provided by NatureServe in collaboration with Bruce Patterson, Wes Sechrest, Marcelo Tognelli, Gerardo Ceballos, The Nature Conservancy-Migratory Bird Program, Conservation International-CABS, World Wildlife Fund-US, and Environment Canada-WILDSPACE."

Citation for Amphibian Range Maps of the Western Hemisphere:
IUCN, Conservation International, and NatureServe. 2004. Global Amphibian Assessment. IUCN, Conservation International, and NatureServe, Washington, DC and Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Acknowledgement Statement for Amphibian Range Maps of the Western Hemisphere:
"Data developed as part of the Global Amphibian Assessment and provided by IUCN-World Conservation Union, Conservation International and NatureServe."

NOTE: Full metadata for the Bird Range Maps of North America is available at:
http://www.natureserve.org/library/birdDistributionmapsmetadatav1.pdf.

Full metadata for the Mammal Range Maps of North America is available at:
http://www.natureserve.org/library/mammalsDistributionmetadatav1.pdf.

Restrictions on Use: Permission to use, copy and distribute documents delivered from this server is hereby granted under the following conditions:
  1. The above copyright notice must appear in all copies;
  2. Any use of the documents available from this server must be for informational purposes only and in no instance for commercial purposes;
  3. Some data may be downloaded to files and altered in format for analytical purposes, however the data should still be referenced using the citation above;
  4. No graphics available from this server can be used, copied or distributed separate from the accompanying text. Any rights not expressly granted herein are reserved by NatureServe. Nothing contained herein shall be construed as conferring by implication, estoppel, or otherwise any license or right under any trademark of NatureServe. No trademark owned by NatureServe may be used in advertising or promotion pertaining to the distribution of documents delivered from this server without specific advance permission from NatureServe. Except as expressly provided above, nothing contained herein shall be construed as conferring any license or right under any NatureServe copyright.
Information Warranty Disclaimer: All documents and related graphics provided by this server and any other documents which are referenced by or linked to this server are provided "as is" without warranty as to the currentness, completeness, or accuracy of any specific data. NatureServe hereby disclaims all warranties and conditions with regard to any documents provided by this server or any other documents which are referenced by or linked to this server, including but not limited to all implied warranties and conditions of merchantibility, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement. NatureServe makes no representations about the suitability of the information delivered from this server or any other documents that are referenced to or linked to this server. In no event shall NatureServe be liable for any special, indirect, incidental, consequential damages, or for damages of any kind arising out of or in connection with the use or performance of information contained in any documents provided by this server or in any other documents which are referenced by or linked to this server, under any theory of liability used. NatureServe may update or make changes to the documents provided by this server at any time without notice; however, NatureServe makes no commitment to update the information contained herein. Since the data in the central databases are continually being updated, it is advisable to refresh data retrieved at least once a year after its receipt. The data provided is for planning, assessment, and informational purposes. Site specific projects or activities should be reviewed for potential environmental impacts with appropriate regulatory agencies. If ground-disturbing activities are proposed on a site, the appropriate state natural heritage program(s) or conservation data center can be contacted for a site-specific review of the project area (see Visit Local Programs).

Feedback Request: NatureServe encourages users to let us know of any errors or significant omissions that you find in the data through (see Contact Us). Your comments will be very valuable in improving the overall quality of our databases for the benefit of all users.