Bombus vosnesenskii - Radoszkowski, 1862
Vosnesensky's Bumble Bee
Other English Common Names: Yellow-faced Bumble Bee
Synonym(s): Bombus (Pyrobombus) vosnesenskii Radoszkowski, 1862
Taxonomic Status: Accepted
Related ITIS Name(s): Bombus vosnesenskii Radoszkowski, 1862 (TSN 714848)
French Common Names: Bourdon ā face jaune
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.819691
Element Code: IIHYM24400
Informal Taxonomy: Animals, Invertebrates - Insects - Bumble Bees
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Animalia Mandibulata Insecta Hymenoptera Apidae Bombus
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Concept Reference
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Concept Reference: Williams, P. H. 2008a. Bombus, bumblebees of the world. Web pages based on Williams, P.H. 1998. An annotated checklist of bumblebees with an analysis of patterns of description (Hymenoptera: Apidae, Bombini). Bulletin of the Natural History Museum (Entomology) 67:79-152. Online. Available: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/research/projects/bombus/index.html. Accessed 2008-Oct.
Concept Reference Code: W08WIL01EHUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Bombus (Pyrobombus) vosnesenskii
Taxonomic Comments: Subgenus: Pyrobombus.
Conservation Status
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NatureServe Status

Global Status: G5
Global Status Last Reviewed: 19Mar2018
Global Status Last Changed: 27Apr2010
Ranking Methodology Used: Ranked by calculator
Rounded Global Status: G5 - Secure
Reasons: Although it has a somewhat modest West Coast range, this is a very common bumble bee in many areas. Although there is a long-term decline in relative abundance, it appears to be increasing in some part of its range. It seems to benefit from urbanization since it does well in urban parks and gardens and thrives in some agricultural systems. It is often the most common bumble bee in such places and may exclude other species. It also occurs in more natural systems but is not as dominant in these.
Nation: United States
National Status: N5 (21Jun2010)
Nation: Canada
National Status: N5 (15Jun2017)

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
United States California (SNR), Idaho (S4), Nevada (SNR), Oregon (SNR), Washington (S5?)
Canada British Columbia (S5)

Other Statuses

IUCN Red List Category: LC - Least concern

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent: >2,500,000 square km (greater than 1,000,000 square miles)
Range Extent Comments: Occurs in the mountain west, from southern British Columbia south to California, western Nevada, and Baja California Norte, Mexico (Williams et al. 2014). Fraser et al. (2012) note that the range in British Columbia has increased rapidly since 2000, expanding north in the Okanagan Valley, west to the Similkameen Valley and has become firmly established in south coastal regions of the province, including Vancouver Island.

The historical range extent of this species is estimated at 1,136,373 kmē, and the extent of current (2008-2017) observations is 3,741,555 kmē. Controlling for larger historical sample size, the range of this species has increased by an estimated 238%.

Area of Occupancy: 501-2,500 4-km2 grid cells
Area of Occupancy Comments: Considering all available historical data, the historical (i.e., observations before 2008) Area of Occupancy for this species was 8,256 kmē. The recent period AOO is 3,284 kmē, an increase of 49% when controlling for larger historical sample size.

Number of Occurrences: 81 - 300
Number of Occurrences Comments: In the recent period (2008-2017), 300 occurrences (i.e., observations separated from others by >5 km) of this species have been reported, a 45% decline over historical occurrences when controlling for larger historical sample size.

Overall Threat Impact: Low
Overall Threat Impact Comments: This species has been reported to be in local decline in areas of coastal California due to competition from honey bees and drought-associated limitation of nectar and pollen sources (Thomson 2016). No other specific threats have been identified as currently impacting this relatively common and abundant species and it apparently benefits from many forms of habitat conversion, e.g. urbanization and some forms of agriculture which seem to give it an advantage over related species. However, the current development of this species for use as a commercial bumble bee may pose future threats to this species, since bumble bees reared in facilities can harbor high levels of diseases, including novel diseases, that can spread to wild bee populations in areas where the commercial bees are released (see Colla et al. 2006). This species may have lower susceptibility to Nosema bombi than other bumble bees (see Cameron et al. 2011).

Short-term Trend: Unknown
Short-term Trend Comments: The available collections and observational data do not allow us to estimate short-term (2008-2017) trends for this species. However, it appears to have increased in some urban areas, for example around San Francisco.

Long-term Trend: Decline of 50-70%
Long-term Trend Comments: Since about 1940, this species has shown a consistent decrease in relative abundance. Overall, relative abundance in recent collections (2008-2017) has declined 68% from historic highs, or 39% when compared to its historical average.

Intrinsic Vulnerability: Not intrinsically vulnerable

Environmental Specificity: Broad. Generalist or community with all key requirements common.

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
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Global Range: (>2,500,000 square km (greater than 1,000,000 square miles)) Occurs in the mountain west, from southern British Columbia south to California, western Nevada, and Baja California Norte, Mexico (Williams et al. 2014). Fraser et al. (2012) note that the range in British Columbia has increased rapidly since 2000, expanding north in the Okanagan Valley, west to the Similkameen Valley and has become firmly established in south coastal regions of the province, including Vancouver Island.

The historical range extent of this species is estimated at 1,136,373 kmē, and the extent of current (2008-2017) observations is 3,741,555 kmē. Controlling for larger historical sample size, the range of this species has increased by an estimated 238%.

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
Color legend for Distribution Map
Endemism: occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States CA, ID, NV, OR, WA
Canada BC

Range Map
No map available.

Ecology & Life History
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Reproduction Comments: Nests below ground. Males patrol in circuits in search of mates (Williams et al. 2014).
Habitat Type: Terrestrial
Non-Migrant: N
Locally Migrant: N
Long Distance Migrant: N
Terrestrial Habitat(s): Grassland/herbaceous, Shrubland/chaparral, Suburban/orchard, Urban/edificarian
Habitat Comments: Inhabits open grassy areas, urban parks and gardens, chaparral and shrub areas, and mountain meadows (Williams et al. 2014).
Food Comments: Example food plants include Arctostaphylos, Ceanothus, Chrysothamnus, Cirsium, Eriogonum, Eschscholzia, Lupinus, Phacelia, Rhododendron, Ribes, Vicia, Ericameria, Clarkia and Grindelia (Williams et al. 2014).
Phenology Comments: It is an early emerging, dominant species that can out-compete other bumble bees in some areas, and may be attributed to apparent declines in some bees, such as Bombus sitkensis, which also uses rodent holes as nest sites (McFrederick and LeBuhn 2006).
Colonial Breeder: Y
Economic Attributes
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Economic Comments: It is a potentially useful species for commercial pollination projects.
Management Summary Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Delineation Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Viability
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U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
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Authors/Contributors
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NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Edition Date: 07Apr2018
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Author: Schweitzer, D. F. (2010), Ormes, M. and Sears, N. (2018)

Zoological data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs) and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

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