Astragalus iselyi - Welsh
Isely's Milkvetch
Other Common Names: Isely's milkvetch
Taxonomic Status: Accepted
Related ITIS Name(s): Astragalus iselyi Welsh (TSN 25549)
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.132514
Element Code: PDFAB0F4E0
Informal Taxonomy: Plants, Vascular - Flowering Plants - Pea Family
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Plantae Anthophyta Dicotyledoneae Fabales Fabaceae Astragalus
Check this box to expand all report sections:
Concept Reference
Help
Concept Reference: Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.
Concept Reference Code: B94KAR01HQUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Astragalus iselyi
Conservation Status
Help

NatureServe Status

Global Status: G1
Global Status Last Reviewed: 22Sep2011
Global Status Last Changed: 05Mar1994
Rounded Global Status: G1 - Critically Imperiled
Reasons: A narrow endemic of southeastern Utah, known from 3 general areas astride the Grand-San Juan county line; the single Grand County location being disjunct 22.5 km to the northeast. Uranium exploration and mining has occurred within the species' habitat in the past and recent prices have sparked a renewed interest.
Nation: United States
National Status: N1

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
United States Utah (S1)

Other Statuses

Comments on USESA: Formerly a category 2 candidate for listing under the Endangered Species Act 1973, as amended (Vol. 58 Federal Register No. 188).

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent Comments: An extremely narrow Utah endemic found on the west slope of the La Sal Mountains, in Grand (a single location) and San Juan counties.

Area of Occupancy: 26-500 4-km2 grid cells
Area of Occupancy Comments: On the low end of 4-20 sq km (Franklin 2003). It is estimated that the area of occupancy would fit within nine 2x2 km grid cells (NatureServe element occurrence data 2011).

Number of Occurrences: 6 - 20
Number of Occurrences Comments: Following needed remapping, it is suspected that there will be 9 EOs, one of which is based on a questionable collection location.

Population Size Comments: Includes a combination of seedlings and adults (Franklin 2003).

Number of Occurrences with Good Viability/Integrity: Unknown

Overall Threat Impact: Very high - medium
Overall Threat Impact Comments: Area subject to heavy grazing, some mining and recreation use, and ORV activities. The ongoing renewal of mining claims in the uranium rich habitat on which this plant grows is a concern.

Short-term Trend: Unknown
Short-term Trend Comments: No data available.

Long-term Trend: Unknown
Long-term Trend Comments: No data available.

Intrinsic Vulnerability Comments: It is suspected that this taxon is not intrinsically vulnerable.

Environmental Specificity: Narrow to moderate.
Environmental Specificity Comments: A narrow endemic occurring on substrates weathered from the Morrison, Paradox(?) and Mancos formations. Two of these, i.e., the Morrison and Mancos, occur in band along the lower west slope of the La Sal Mountains where they have been pushed up from below as a result of the laccolithic uplift of the range.

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
Help
Global Range: An extremely narrow Utah endemic found on the west slope of the La Sal Mountains, in Grand (a single location) and San Juan counties.

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
Color legend for Distribution Map

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States UT

Range Map
No map available.


U.S. Distribution by County Help
State County Name (FIPS Code)
UT Grand (49019)*, San Juan (49037)
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
U.S. Distribution by Watershed Help
Watershed Region Help Watershed Name (Watershed Code)
14 Upper Dolores (14030002)+*, Lower Dolores (14030004)+*, Upper Colorado-Kane Springs (14030005)+
+ Natural heritage record(s) exist for this watershed
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
Ecology & Life History
Help
Basic Description: A malodorous perennial herb, 8-25 cm tall, with yellowish-white flowers blooming late March to May.
Technical Description: Caulescent perennial, 8-25 cm tall; flowers ochroleucous, concolorous, 17-19 mm long; calyx tube 5.5-6.3 mm long, cylindric, strigulose; leaflets sparsely strigose to glabrate on both sides; pods spreading-declined, inflated, subcylindric, 25-38 mm long, strigose, unilocular.
Diagnostic Characteristics: Similar to A. sabulosus var. sabulosus but differs in the smaller white flowers (17-19 mm long vs. 27-24 mm) and the shorter calyx tube (5.5-6.3 mm long vs. 11-5-14 mm).
Duration: PERENNIAL, Short-lived
Terrestrial Habitat(s): Barrens, Desert, Forest/Woodland, Woodland - Conifer
Habitat Comments: Seleniferous and gypsiferous sandy to gravelly clay slopes of the uranium-rich soils derived from the Morrison (3 locations), Paradox (1 location) and Mancos formations at 1525 to 2010 m elevation in pinyon-juniper and desert scrub communities (Goodrich er al. 1999).
Economic Attributes
Help
Economically Important Genus: Y
Management Summary
Help
Stewardship Overview: Management of this species should include: 1) further documentation of the species' range, status, and trends, 2) revisitation of known sites to confirm status and evaluate impact of threats, 3) consideration of long-term protection for populations most at risk to mining activities, 4) and consideration of barriers to prevent ATVs and damage by other recreational activities and damage by grazers.
Population/Occurrence Delineation Not yet assessed
Help
Population/Occurrence Viability
Help
U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
Help
Authors/Contributors
Help
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Edition Date: 27Jul2007
NatureServe Conservation Status Factors Author: Niese, J. (1994-03-05); rev. B. Franklin (1996); B. Franklin (7/07); rev. A. Treher (2011)
Management Information Edition Date: 18Aug2011
Management Information Edition Author: Treher, A.

Botanical data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs), The North Carolina Botanical Garden, and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References
Help
  • Anonymous. No Date. List of collections of sensitive species in Bureau of Land Management Moab District.

  • Barneby, R.C. 1989. Fabales. In A. Cronquist, A.H. Holmgren, N.H. Holmgren, J.L. Reveal, and P.K. Holmgren (eds.). Intermountain flora: Vascular plants of the Intermountain West, U.S.A. Vol. 3, Part B. New York Botanical Garden, Bronx. 279 pp.

  • Debacon, M. and J.M. Porter. 1996. DRAFT - Isozyme, nrDNA Sequence, and cpDNA noncoding sequence variation associated with Astragalus equisolensis, A. isleyi and A. sabulosus (Fabaceae). 12 pp. + tables and figures.

  • Franklin, B. 2003. Data from the Utah Natural Heritage Program.

  • Franklin, M.A. 2005. Plant information compiled by the Utah Natural Heritage Program: A progress report. Publication Number 05-40. Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, Salt Lake City, Utah. 341 pp. [http://dwrcdc.nr.utah.gov/ucdc/ViewReports/plantrpt.htm]

  • Goodrich, S., L. Armstrong, and R.Thompson. 1999. Endemic and endangered plants of Pinyon Juniper communities. USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-9 260-268.

  • Heil, K. D., D. Hyder, R. Melton, and R. Fleming. 1991. The threatened/endangered flora of the San Juan Resource Area. Contract #J910C10022. Pp. 1-36 + appendices.

  • Hreha, Alyce M. 1982. Status report on Astragalus iselyi. Meiiji Resource Consultants. 23 pp.

  • Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.

  • Spahr, R., L. Armstrong, D. Atwood, and M. Rath. 1991. Threatened, endangered, and sensitive species of the Intermountain Region. U.S. Forest Service, Ogden, Utah.

  • Thompson, B. 1991. Information on sensitive species of the Manti La-Sal National Forest and elsewhere.

  • Thompson, Bob. 1987. Astragalus iselyi status report. 3 pp. + appendix.

  • Welsh, S. L. 1974. Utah plant novelties in Astragalus and Yucca. Great Basin Naturalist 34: 305-310.

  • Welsh, S. L. 1978. Endangered and threatened plants of Utah: a reevaluation. Great Basin Naturalist 38(1): 1-18.

  • Welsh, S. L. 1978. Status report: Astragalus iselyi. Unpublished report prepared for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  • Welsh, S. L. 1983. Collection data - rare plants of Utah. Prepared by Endangered Plant Studies, Inc. 129 North 1000 East, Orem, UT 84057. Report from Larry England, US Fish and Wildlife Service, T & E Species.

  • Welsh, S. L., N. D. Atwood, and J. L. Reveal. 1975 [1976]. Endangered, threatened, extinct, endemic, and rare or restricted Utah vascular plants. Great Basin Naturalist 35(4): 327-376.

  • Welsh, S.L., N.D. Atwood, L.C. Higgins, and S. Goodrich, eds. 1987. A Utah Flora. Great Basin Naturalist Memoir 9, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah. 894 pp.

Use Guidelines & Citation

Use Guidelines and Citation

The Small Print: Trademark, Copyright, Citation Guidelines, Restrictions on Use, and Information Disclaimer.

Note: All species and ecological community data presented in NatureServe Explorer at http://explorer.natureserve.org were updated to be current with NatureServe's central databases as of March 2018.
Note: This report was printed on

Trademark Notice: "NatureServe", NatureServe Explorer, The NatureServe logo, and all other names of NatureServe programs referenced herein are trademarks of NatureServe. Any other product or company names mentioned herein are the trademarks of their respective owners.

Copyright Notice: Copyright © 2018 NatureServe, 4600 N. Fairfax Dr., 7th Floor, Arlington Virginia 22203, U.S.A. All Rights Reserved. Each document delivered from this server or web site may contain other proprietary notices and copyright information relating to that document. The following citation should be used in any published materials which reference the web site.

Citation for data on website including State Distribution, Watershed, and Reptile Range maps:
NatureServe. 2018. NatureServe Explorer: An online encyclopedia of life [web application]. Version 7.1. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia. Available http://explorer.natureserve.org. (Accessed:

Citation for Bird Range Maps of North America:
Ridgely, R.S., T.F. Allnutt, T. Brooks, D.K. McNicol, D.W. Mehlman, B.E. Young, and J.R. Zook. 2003. Digital Distribution Maps of the Birds of the Western Hemisphere, version 1.0. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Acknowledgement Statement for Bird Range Maps of North America:
"Data provided by NatureServe in collaboration with Robert Ridgely, James Zook, The Nature Conservancy - Migratory Bird Program, Conservation International - CABS, World Wildlife Fund - US, and Environment Canada - WILDSPACE."

Citation for Mammal Range Maps of North America:
Patterson, B.D., G. Ceballos, W. Sechrest, M.F. Tognelli, T. Brooks, L. Luna, P. Ortega, I. Salazar, and B.E. Young. 2003. Digital Distribution Maps of the Mammals of the Western Hemisphere, version 1.0. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Acknowledgement Statement for Mammal Range Maps of North America:
"Data provided by NatureServe in collaboration with Bruce Patterson, Wes Sechrest, Marcelo Tognelli, Gerardo Ceballos, The Nature Conservancy-Migratory Bird Program, Conservation International-CABS, World Wildlife Fund-US, and Environment Canada-WILDSPACE."

Citation for Amphibian Range Maps of the Western Hemisphere:
IUCN, Conservation International, and NatureServe. 2004. Global Amphibian Assessment. IUCN, Conservation International, and NatureServe, Washington, DC and Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Acknowledgement Statement for Amphibian Range Maps of the Western Hemisphere:
"Data developed as part of the Global Amphibian Assessment and provided by IUCN-World Conservation Union, Conservation International and NatureServe."

NOTE: Full metadata for the Bird Range Maps of North America is available at:
http://www.natureserve.org/library/birdDistributionmapsmetadatav1.pdf.

Full metadata for the Mammal Range Maps of North America is available at:
http://www.natureserve.org/library/mammalsDistributionmetadatav1.pdf.

Restrictions on Use: Permission to use, copy and distribute documents delivered from this server is hereby granted under the following conditions:
  1. The above copyright notice must appear in all copies;
  2. Any use of the documents available from this server must be for informational purposes only and in no instance for commercial purposes;
  3. Some data may be downloaded to files and altered in format for analytical purposes, however the data should still be referenced using the citation above;
  4. No graphics available from this server can be used, copied or distributed separate from the accompanying text. Any rights not expressly granted herein are reserved by NatureServe. Nothing contained herein shall be construed as conferring by implication, estoppel, or otherwise any license or right under any trademark of NatureServe. No trademark owned by NatureServe may be used in advertising or promotion pertaining to the distribution of documents delivered from this server without specific advance permission from NatureServe. Except as expressly provided above, nothing contained herein shall be construed as conferring any license or right under any NatureServe copyright.
Information Warranty Disclaimer: All documents and related graphics provided by this server and any other documents which are referenced by or linked to this server are provided "as is" without warranty as to the currentness, completeness, or accuracy of any specific data. NatureServe hereby disclaims all warranties and conditions with regard to any documents provided by this server or any other documents which are referenced by or linked to this server, including but not limited to all implied warranties and conditions of merchantibility, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement. NatureServe makes no representations about the suitability of the information delivered from this server or any other documents that are referenced to or linked to this server. In no event shall NatureServe be liable for any special, indirect, incidental, consequential damages, or for damages of any kind arising out of or in connection with the use or performance of information contained in any documents provided by this server or in any other documents which are referenced by or linked to this server, under any theory of liability used. NatureServe may update or make changes to the documents provided by this server at any time without notice; however, NatureServe makes no commitment to update the information contained herein. Since the data in the central databases are continually being updated, it is advisable to refresh data retrieved at least once a year after its receipt. The data provided is for planning, assessment, and informational purposes. Site specific projects or activities should be reviewed for potential environmental impacts with appropriate regulatory agencies. If ground-disturbing activities are proposed on a site, the appropriate state natural heritage program(s) or conservation data center can be contacted for a site-specific review of the project area (see Visit Local Programs).

Feedback Request: NatureServe encourages users to let us know of any errors or significant omissions that you find in the data through (see Contact Us). Your comments will be very valuable in improving the overall quality of our databases for the benefit of all users.