Asplenium trichomanes - L.
Maidenhair Spleenwort
Other Common Names: maidenhair spleenwort
Taxonomic Status: Accepted
Related ITIS Name(s): Asplenium trichomanes L. (TSN 17364)
French Common Names: doradille chevelue
Unique Identifier: ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.129841
Element Code: PPASP021K0
Informal Taxonomy: Plants, Vascular - Ferns and relatives
 
Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus
Plantae Filicinophyta Filicopsida Filicales Aspleniaceae Asplenium
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Concept Reference
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Concept Reference: Kartesz, J.T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. 2nd edition. 2 vols. Timber Press, Portland, OR.
Concept Reference Code: B94KAR01HQUS
Name Used in Concept Reference: Asplenium trichomanes
Conservation Status
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NatureServe Status

Global Status: G5
Global Status Last Reviewed: 16May2016
Global Status Last Changed: 09Feb1984
Ranking Methodology Used: Ranked by inspection
Rounded Global Status: G5 - Secure
Reasons: Occasional to locally abundant cosmopolitan species with thousands of occurrences.
Nation: United States
National Status: N5
Nation: Canada
National Status: N5 (25Oct2017)

U.S. & Canada State/Province Status
Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
United States Alabama (S2S3), Alaska (S2S3), Arizona (SNR), Arkansas (SNR), California (SNR), Colorado (SNR), Connecticut (SNR), Delaware (S1.1), District of Columbia (SNR), Florida (SNR), Georgia (S5), Hawaii (SNR), Idaho (S1), Illinois (S2), Indiana (SNR), Kansas (S3), Kentucky (S4), Louisiana (SX), Maine (SNR), Maryland (SNR), Massachusetts (SNR), Michigan (SNR), Minnesota (S2), Mississippi (S1), Missouri (SNR), Montana (SH), Nebraska (SNR), New Hampshire (SNR), New Jersey (SNR), New Mexico (SNR), New York (SNR), North Carolina (S4), Ohio (SNR), Oklahoma (SNR), Oregon (SNR), Pennsylvania (SNR), Rhode Island (S2), South Carolina (S2), South Dakota (S3S4), Tennessee (SNR), Texas (S1), Utah (S1), Vermont (SNR), Virginia (S5), Washington (SNR), West Virginia (S5), Wisconsin (S2S3), Wyoming (S1)
Canada British Columbia (S5), New Brunswick (S2), Newfoundland Island (S1S2), Nova Scotia (S3), Ontario (S4), Quebec (S3)

Other Statuses

NatureServe Global Conservation Status Factors

Range Extent Comments: Interruptedly circumboreal, extending south in America, to Oregon, Arizona, Texas, and Georgia. Apparently absent from California, Nevada, and Utah. Sparse.

Population Size Comments: Locally abundant in appropriate habitat.

Other NatureServe Conservation Status Information

Distribution
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Global Range: Interruptedly circumboreal, extending south in America, to Oregon, Arizona, Texas, and Georgia. Apparently absent from California, Nevada, and Utah. Sparse.

U.S. States and Canadian Provinces

Due to latency between updates made in state, provincial or other NatureServe Network databases and when they appear on NatureServe Explorer, for state or provincial information you may wish to contact the data steward in your jurisdiction to obtain the most current data. Please refer to our Distribution Data Sources to find contact information for your jurisdiction.
Color legend for Distribution Map

U.S. & Canada State/Province Distribution
United States AK, AL, AR, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, HI, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, LAextirpated, MA, MD, ME, MI, MN, MO, MS, MT, NC, NE, NH, NJ, NM, NY, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VA, VT, WA, WI, WV, WY
Canada BC, NB, NF, NS, ON, QC

Range Map
No map available.


U.S. Distribution by County Help
State County Name (FIPS Code)
AL Etowah (01055), Jackson (01071)*, Talladega (01121), Tuscaloosa (01125)
CA Del Norte (06015)
DE New Castle (10003)
ID Boundary (16021), Clearwater (16035)*
KS Chautauqua (20019), Franklin (20059)
MN Cook (27031), Goodhue (27049)*, Lake (27075)
MS Tishomingo (28141)
MT Flathead (30029)*
RI Kent (44003), Providence (44007), Washington (44009)
SC Greenville (45045), Oconee (45073), Pickens (45077)
SD Custer (46033), Pennington (46103)
WI Adams (55001), Ashland (55003), Columbia (55021), Door (55029), Iron (55051), Juneau (55057), Marinette (55075), Sauk (55111)
WY Albany (56001), Converse (56009), Natrona (56025)
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
U.S. Distribution by Watershed Help
Watershed Region Help Watershed Name (Watershed Code)
01 Blackstone (01090003)+, Narragansett (01090004)+, Pawcatuck-Wood (01090005)+
02 Brandywine-Christina (02040205)+
03 Saluda (03050109)+, Seneca (03060101)+, Tugaloo (03060102)+, Middle Coosa (03150106)+, Upper Tombigbee (03160101)+*, Upper Black Warrior (03160112)+
04 Baptism-Brule (04010101)+, Beaver-Lester (04010102)+, Bad-Montreal (04010302)+, Door-Kewaunee (04030102)+, Menominee (04030108)+
06 Guntersville Lake (06030001)+*, Bear (06030006)+
07 Cannon (07040002)+*, Castle Rock (07070003)+, Baraboo (07070004)+, Lower Wisconsin (07070005)+
09 Rainy Headwaters (09030001)+
10 Middle Cheyenne-Spring (10120109)+, Sweetwater (10180006)+, Glendo Reservoir (10180008)+, Crow (10190009)+, Upper Marais Des Cygnes (10290101)+
11 Caney (11070106)+
17 Lower Kootenai (17010104)+, Flathead Lake (17010208)+*, South Fork Flathead (17010209)+*, Stillwater (17010210)+*, Upper North Fork Clearwater (17060307)+*
18 Smith (18010101)+
+ Natural heritage record(s) exist for this watershed
* Extirpated/possibly extirpated
Ecology & Life History
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Basic Description: Plant, vascular cryptogam, fern, Aspidiaceae.
General Description: Maidenhair Spleenwort is a perennial with short rhizomes and glabrous, evergreen fronds clustered from the base of the plant. Each frond is 7-35 cm long, and is pinnately divided into numerous pinnae that are arranged alternately on the shiny, reddish-brown central axis (rachis) of the frond. The naked petioles and central axes tend to persist after the pinnae have fallen; each pinna is 5 mm wide and entire-margined below, but shallowly lobed toward the tip. Spores are borne in 1-4 clusters arranged along the veins on the undersides of the pinnae; the spores are partially enfolded by a thin, white tissue, the indusium.
Technical Description: Leaves clustered, spreading, 0.7-3.5 dm long, glabrous, evergreen, the petioles and rachises tending to persist after the leaflets have fallen; petiole short, about 1 mm or less thick, shining reddish-brown, broadly rounded beneath (abaxially) and with a pair of yellowish, cartilaginous ridges or very narrow wings which mark the borders of the flattened upper (adaxial) side; blade elongate and narrow, the rachis of the same form and color as the stipe; pinnae mostly 12-35 opposite or offset pairs, 2.5-9 mm long and 1.5-7 mm wide, with a few rounded teeth, obscurely veined, the distal ones progressivley reduced; sori several, mostly 1.5-2.5 mm long, obviously longer than wide, straight or nearly so, with a conspicuous indusium, or the sori sometimes expanded and confluent at maturity (Hitchcock et al. 1969).
Diagnostic Characteristics: This species can be distinguished from the more common A. VIRIDE by its shiny, reddish-brown leaf stems.
Duration: PERENNIAL, EVERGREEN
Reproduction Comments: Asplenium trichomanes can reproduce asexually by rhizomes (Lellinger 1985).
Terrestrial Habitat(s): Cliff
Habitat Comments: Maidenhair spleenwort occurs in moist, rocky, cliff crevices and talus slopes. Taylor (as cited in Lorain 1989) indicates it prefers calcareous rock. Species commonly found growing with maidenhair spleenwort include a number of mosses and Polypodium hesperium. Nearby it is common to find Oplopanax horridum, Asarum caudatum, Athyrium filix-femina, and Disporum hookeri (Lorain 1989).
Economic Attributes Not yet assessed
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Management Summary Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Delineation Not yet assessed
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Population/Occurrence Viability
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U.S. Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank) Not yet assessed
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Authors/Contributors
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Element Ecology & Life History Edition Date: 05Jan1993
Element Ecology & Life History Author(s): kmh

Botanical data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs), The North Carolina Botanical Garden, and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References
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