Glossary - S
     
 
   
 

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S

S#S#: NatureServe Subnational Conservation Status Rank (SRank), Range RankSee NatureServe Conservation Status.
S?: NatureServe Subnational Conservation Status Rank (SRank), UnrankedSee NatureServe Conservation Status.
S1: NatureServe Subnational Conservation Status Rank (SRank), Critically ImperiledSee NatureServe Conservation Status.
S2: NatureServe Subnational Conservation Status Rank (SRank), ImperiledSee NatureServe Conservation Status.
S3: NatureServe Subnational Conservation Status Rank (SRank), VulnerableSee NatureServe Conservation Status.
S4: NatureServe Subnational Conservation Status Rank (SRank), Apparently SecureSee NatureServe Conservation Status.
S5: NatureServe Subnational Conservation Status Rank (SRank), SecureSee NatureServe Conservation Status.

Sand/Dune: Open sandy beaches above high tide, barren active dunes, and similar areas of barren, largely unvegetated sand. Does not include stabilized thickly vegetated dunes.

SC: Abbreviation for the state of South Carolina. (United States)

Scientific Name (Association or Ecological System): The name of the Association or Ecological System adopted for use by NatureServe; Association names are based on the scientific names of the dominant and diagnostic species. For more information please see Classification of Ecological Communities.

Scientific Name (Species): The scientific name for an element adopted for use by NatureServe; generally based on standard botanical or major zoological taxonomic references. For more information please see Classification Sources.

SD: Abbreviation for the state of South Dakota. (United States)
Secondary Classifiers: Secondary classifiers used to classify the Ecological Systems.
Separation Barriers: Examples of typical barriers that would separate occurrences of the species, regardless of the actual distance between them. Barriers almost completely prevent movement or dispersal of the species, thereby obstructing or severely limiting gene flow.
Separation Distance for Suitable Habitat: Distance (in kilometers) of intervening suitable habitat not known to be occupied that is great enough to effectively separate occurrences by limiting movement or dispersal of individuals between them. Suitable habitat is habitat capable of supporting reproduction or used regularly for feeding or other essential life history functions; a habitat in which you would expect to find the species (assuming appropriate season and conditions). For most animal species, the recommended minimum separation distance for intervening suitable habitat is 2 km. This is to ensure that occurrences are not separated by unreasonably small distances, which would lead to the identification of unnecessarily fragmented populations as potential targets for conservation planning or action. Note: The separation distances for animals are currently under review and subject to revision.
Separation Distance for Unsuitable Habitat: Distance (in kilometers) of intervening unsuitable habitat that is great enough to effectively separate occurrences by restricting movement or dispersal of individuals between them. In most cases, unsuitable habitat is habitat through which individuals may move, but that does not support reproduction or long-term survival. For most species, the recommended minimum separation distance for intervening unsuitable habitat is 1 km. This is to ensure that occurrences are not separated by unreasonably small distances, which would lead to the identification of unnecessarily fragmented populations as potential targets for conservation planning or action. Note: The separation distances for animals are currently under review and subject to revision.
Separation Justification: Basis for the separation distances designated (e.g., home range, dispersal distance, spatial patterns of occurrence, temporal patterns of occurrence), including citations if available.
SH: NatureServe Subnational Conservation Status Rank (SRank), Possibly ExtirpatedSee NatureServe Conservation Status.

Shallow Water: The littoral zone: characterized by the frequent presence of rooted aquatic plants, disturbance by wave action, and periodic exposure during drawdown (during drought, for example). Some lakes and ponds are all shallow water; in some others, shallow water is restricted to shores and bays.

Short Term Trend: A code indicating the degree of past directional change in population size (for species), extent of occurrence, area of occupancy, number of occurrences, and/or viability or ecological integrity of occurrences in the short-term, considered to be typically within 50 years for ecosystems, or within 10 years or 3 generations, whichever is longer (up to 100 years), for species. For more information see NatureServe Conservation Status.
Short Term Trend Comment: Comments on short-term trends of a species or ecological community from a range-wide perspective.
Similar Association Name: The names of Similar Associations which may be mistaken for this Association OR the names of Similar Ecological Systems which may be mistaken for this Ecological System. Note: Only like Ecological Classification System units are compared.
Similar Association Unique Identifier: The unique identifier of Similar Associations which may be mistaken for this Association OR the unique identifier of Similar Ecological Systems which may be mistaken for this Ecological System. Note: Only like Ecological Classification System units are compared.
Similar Ecological Systems Name: The names of Similar Associations which may be mistaken for this Association OR the names of Similar Ecological Systems which may be mistaken for this Ecological System. Note: Only like Ecological Classification System units are compared.
Similar Ecological Systems Unique Identifier: The unique identifier of Similar Associations which may be mistaken for this Association OR the unique identifier of Similar Ecological Systems which may be mistaken for this Ecological System. Note: Only like Ecological Classification System units are compared.
SK: Abbreviation for the province of Saskatchewan. (Canada)
Small Patch:Ecological systems that form small, discrete areas of vegetation cover typically limited in distribution by localized environmental features. In undisturbed conditions, typical occurrences range from 1-50 ha.
SNA: NatureServe Subnational Conservation Status Rank (SRank), Not ApplicableSee NatureServe Conservation Status.
SNR: NatureServe Subnational Conservation Status Rank (SRank), UnrankedSee NatureServe Conservation Status.

Society of American Foresters Cover Types: Society of American foresters (SAF) cover type names. Cover types are a finer scale of resolution within the SAF regions.

Society of American Foresters Region Names: Society of American Foresters region name(s). Values include: EAST - boreal forest, northern forest, central forest, southern forest, tropical forest; WEST - northern interior (boreal), high elevations, middle elevations interior, north pacific, low elevations interior, south pacific.

Spatial Scale and Pattern (See Matrix, Large Patch, Small Patch, Linear): In principle, ecosystems can be defined at any geographic scale, from a rotting log or vernal pond to the entire biosphere. Our decision was to focus on meso-scale ecological system units, which includes temporal and geographic scales intermediate between stand and landscape-scale analyses. These \"meso-scales\" constrain the definition of system types to scales that are of prime interest for conservation and resource managers who are managing landscapes in the context of a region or state.

There are four categories for spatial patterns that encompass all types of terrestrial ecological systems. In each of these instances, an expected spatial scale is included as initial guidance for defined ecological systems within a given area. Review of broadscale ecological pattern for a given region should result in an initial suite of system types that would fall into each of these categories. For example, matrix-forming forests may predominate a given area. Knowledge of compositional variation can be used to initially characterize system types that typically occur in patches ranging from 2,000 on up to 100,000 hectares. Both large patch and small patch systems tend to appear nested within matrix system types, while linear system types occur along riverine corridors, coastal areas, and major physiographic breaks (e.g. cliff faces). While in most instances, the spatial pattern categories are mutually exclusive, there may be instances where the same ecological system type forms the matrix in one part of its range, while occurring as a large patch type elsewhere.

Special Habitat Factors: Indicate(s) the special habitat factor(s) that contribute significantly to the survival or reproduction of the species. Values include: standing snag/hollow tree, fallen log/debris, burrowing in or using soil, benthic, subterranean obligate.

Species Name ( Alliance Floristic Composition)
The scientific name(s) of notable component plant species for the Alliance.

Species Name (Association Floristic Composition) The scientific name(s) of notable component species for the Association. For more information see Classification of Ecological Communities.

Species Impacts: Comments that describe the impacts of this species on other species, especially if this species is a pest, weed, or exotic.

Spring/Spring Brook: Points of concentrated groundwater discharge, either concentrated (at a distinct orifice) or diffuse (at a seep). The outflow channel is classified as a spring brook as far downstream as the spring waters' characteristics (relatively constant temperature, nutrient-poor) are maintained.

Stewardship Overview: A general stewardship summary of the management concerns for this species. Also, indicates whether the species is at risk, or whether it is a pest or weed.

Strictly Isolated Wetlands:These types are defined where >80% of all known occurrences have very infrequent interchange of both surface water and ground water between the wetland and regulated (potentially navigable) water bodies. This condition may be inferred where occurrences are geographically isolated and near-impermeable substrates are characteristic.

NOTE: These definitions were developed solely to facilitate the generation of a classification of isolated wetland ecological system types from NatureServe\'s databases, to create linkages to rare species, and to allow documentation of scientific methodology. They are NOT intended to be a guide for defining individual on-the-ground occurrences of isolated wetlands for regulatory or other purposes. These definitions do not represent an endorsement by NatureServe (a non-advocacy organization) of any particular regulatory or other use by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Army Corps of Engineers, or other federal and state agencies.

SU: NatureServe Subnational Conservation Status Rank (SRank), UnrankableSee NatureServe Conservation Status.

Subaquatic: Subterranean aquatic. Underground waters, above and below the water table.

Subnational Status: The conservation status of a species or community from a state or province perspective, characterizing the relative rarity or imperilment of the element. Developed by NatureServe and its natural heritage member programs. For more information see NatureServe Conservation Status.

Subnational Rank (NatureServe Subnational Conservation Status) For more information see NatureServe Conservation Status.

Subterranean Habitat(s): Subterranean habitat(s) where the element is found. Values include: subterrestrial, subaquatic.

Subterrestrial: Subterranean terrestrial (air-filled) habitats, ranging from large caves to interstitial crevices below soil horizons.

Subtypes: List of any widely used labels describing typical occurrences of the species (e.g., nest, den, old growth).

Suburban/Orchard: Human-maintained habitats, generally characterized by open-grown trees, lawns, and small buildings. Does not include rural residential areas where human dwellings are scattered within or widely adjacent to more or less natural ecosystems or cropland.

Summary: A summary of the geographic range, structure, composition, environmental setting, and distinguishing features of the association or alliance.

Synonyms: Other related names, especially those that programs in the Natural Heritage Network, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, or Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada use for species names, including author. Animals Author: The authority who published the original description for a particular scientific name and the year of the author's publication. Plants Author: The name(s) or conventional abbreviation(s) of the author(s) of the scientific name. Note: Plants: Authors not edited for standardized abbreviations. Animals: Names (and authors) related to names accepted by NatureServe are not maintained for standardness, completeness, or accuracy.

SX: NatureServe Subnational Conservation Status Rank (SRank), Presumed ExtirpatedSee NatureServe Conservation Status.

Ecological Community: For more information see Classification of Ecological Communities.

 

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