Glossary - I
     
 
   
 

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I

I-Rank: short for Invasive Species Impact Rank; a categorical assessment of a plant taxon's negative impact on native biodiversity within the area of the United States to which it is not native. For more information see Invasive Species Assessment Protocol

I-Rank: Rounded I-Rank: this value uses an algorithm to convert I-Ranks that span two or more categories to a single-category I-Rank. When the I-Rank spans two categories, it is rounded to the category of greater impact (e.g. Medium/Low rounded to Medium); when the I-Rank spans three categories, it is rounded to Unknown.

I-Rank Reasons Summary: summary of factors justifying the Invasive Species Impact Rank (I-Rank)

I-Rank Adjusted?: whether or not the Evaluator has adjusted the I-Rank to something different than the Calculated I-Rank

I-Rank: Calculated I-Rank: the I-Rank that is directly calculated from the Evaluator's responses to the 20 Invasive Species Assessment Protocol questions

I-Rank: Adjustment Justification: a summary of the key information and reasons underlying an Evaluator's adjustment of the I-Rank

I-Rank: Subrank I - Ecological Impact: a categorical assessment of a plant taxon's negative ecological impact on native species, communities, and ecosystems within the area of the United States to which it is not native; one of four Subranks contributing to a taxon's I-Rank

I-Rank: Subrank II - Current Distribution/Abundance: a categorical assessment of a plant taxon's current distribution and abundance within the area of the United States to which it is not native; one of four Subranks contributing to a taxon's I-Rank

I-Rank: Subrank III - Trend in Distribution/Abundance: a categorical assessment of the extent to which a plant taxon's distribution and abundance are increasing or could potentially increase within the area of the United States to which it is not native; one of four Subranks contributing to a taxon's I-Rank

I-Rank: Subrank IV - Management Difficulty: a categorical assessment of the difficulty of managing a plant taxon within the area of the United States to which it is not native; one of four Subranks contributing to a taxon's I-Rank

I-Rank Review Date: date on which the I-Rank was last reviewed (i.e., assigned, reaffirmed, or changed)

I-Rank: Evaluator: name(s) of the person(s) who significantly contributed to the assessment of the current I-Rank

I-Rank: Non-native throughout the U.S.?: whether or not a plant taxon is considered non-native throughout the United States; if "No", the taxon is native in one part of the United States, but is established outside cultivation as a non-native in a different part of the United States

I-Rank: Native Range: a description of the generalized area to which a plant taxon is considered native

I-Rank: S-1. Established outside cultivation as a non-native?: whether or not a plant taxon is currently established outside cultivation as a non-native somewhere within the United States (either present solely as a non-native, or established as a non-native in a portion of the United States different from its native range)

I-Rank: S-2. Present in conservation areas or other native species habitats?: whether or not a plant taxon is known or suspected to be present in conservation areas or other native species habitats (places supporting viable or otherwise long-persisting occurrences of native species) somewhere within the United States

I-Rank: Q01. Impact on Ecosystem Processes and System-wide Parameters: a categorical assessment of the extent to which a plant taxon alters abiotic ecosystem processes and system-wide parameters (e.g. hydrological regime, nutrient dynamics) within the area of the United States to which it is not native

I-Rank: Q02. Impact on Ecological Community Structure: a categorical assessment of the extent to which a plant taxon alters vegetation structure within the area of the United States to which it is not native

I-Rank: Q03. Impact on Ecological Community Composition: a categorical assessment of the extent to which a plant taxon alters the composition of ecological communities (i.e. changes the relative abundance of native species or alters successional patterns) within the area of the United States to which it is not native

I-Rank: Q04. Impact on Individual Native Plant or Animal Species: a categorical assessment of the extent to which a plant taxon disproportionately affects (e.g. by hybridization or parasitism) a particular native species within the area of the United States to which it is not native

I-Rank: Q05. Conservation Significance of the Communities and Native Species Threatened: a categorical assessment of the extent to which a plant taxon threatens rare or vulnerable native species or ecological communities or outstanding, high quality occurrences of common ecological communities within the area of the United States to which it is not native

I-Rank: Q06. Current Range Size in Nation: of the area within the United States to which a plant taxon is not native, a categorical assessment of the percentage it currently occupies (outside cultivation)

I-Rank: Q07. Proportion of Current Range Where the Species is Negatively Impacting Biodiversity: a categorical assessment of the proportion of its total range in which a plant taxon is causing noticeable negative impacts on native biodiversity, with total range including areas within the United States to which the taxon is not native, but is present outside cultivation.

I-Rank: Q08. Proportion of Nationís Biogeographic Units Invaded: of the ecoregions (as defined by The Nature Conservancy, 2001) within the United States to which a plant taxon is not native, a categorical assessment of the proportion it currently occupies (outside cultivation)

I-Rank: Q09. Diversity of Habitats or Ecological Systems Invaded in Nation: a categorical assessment of the number of distinct habitats or ecological systems currently occupied by a plant taxon within the area of the United States to which it is not native

I-Rank: Q10. Current Trend in Total Range within Nation: a categorical assessment of the degree to which a plant taxon's range is expanding within the area of the United States to which it is not native

I-Rank: Q11. Proportion of Potential Range Currently Occupied: of the area within the United States in which a plant taxon is (1) not native and (2) potentially capable of persistence, a categorical assessment of the percentage it does not currently occupy (outside cultivation)

I-Rank: Q12. Long-distance Dispersal Potential within Nation: a categorical assessment of a plant taxon's potential frequency of long-distance ( > 100 km) dispersal within the area of the United States to which it is not native

I-Rank: Q13. Local Range Expansion or Change in Abundance: a categorical assessment of the degree local expansion at the edges of a plant taxon's range and/or of increase in its total abundance within the area of the United States to which it is not native

I-Rank: Q14. Inherent Ability to Invade Conservation Areas and Other Native Species Habitats: a categorical assessment of a plant taxon's ability to invade well-established, mature natural vegetation within the area of the United States to which it is not native

I-Rank: Q15. Similar Habitats Invaded Elsewhere a categorical assessment of the likelihood that a plant taxon will expand to invade additional habitat types within the area of the United States to which it is not native, based on its behavior in other locations outside its native range

I-Rank: Q16. Reproductive Characteristics: a categorical assessment of the extent to which a plant taxon exhibits aggressive reproductive characteristics within the area of the United States to which it is not native

I-Rank: Q17. General Management Difficulty: a categorical assessment of the human and/or financial resources needed to control an established stand of a plant taxon within the area of the United States to which it is not native

I-Rank: Q18. Minimum Time Commitment: a categorical assessment of the minimum time commitment needed to control a plant taxon (e.g. reduce to acceptable levels which can be maintained with little effort) at a 1-hectare site where it is well established within the area of the United States to which it is not native

I-Rank: Q19. Impacts of Management on Native Species: a categorical assessment of the likelihood that control of a plant taxon will cause significant and persistent reductions in the abundance of native species within the area of the United States to which the taxon is not native

I-Rank: Q20. Accessibility of Invaded Areas: a categorical assessment of the difficulty in accessing areas invaded by a plant taxon within the area of the United States to which it is not native

I-Rank: Other Considerations: information pertaining to a plant taxon's I-Rank that has not been captured elsewhere

IA: Abbreviation for the state of Iowa. (United States)

Ice: Glaciers, snow fields, and ice fields.

ID: Abbreviation for the state of Idaho. (United States)
IL: Abbreviation for the state of Illinois. (United States)

Immature Food Habits: Trophic type which characterizes the food habits of the immature form of the element. Values include: carnivore, piscivore, invertivore, herbivore, granivore, frugivore, nectarivore, detritivore, scavenger, coprophagous, parasitic, nonfeeding, unknown. The trophic type should constitute 90% of the element's seasonal diet for any season of the year.

Immature Phenology: Phenology type(s) of the element during its immature stage. Values include: hibernates/estivates, circadian, diurnal, nocturnal, crepuscular.

Implied Status Under the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada: The current status of the taxon according to the at-risk categories developed by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) as interpreted by NatureServe. For more inforamtion see COSEWIC.

Implied Status Under the U.S. Endangered Species Act: The current status of the taxon under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (USESA) as interpreted by NatureServe. Interpreted status is determined from the taxonomic relationship of the Element to a taxon having USESA status, or its relationship to geopolitical or administratively defined members of a taxon having USESA status. For more information see U.S. ESA.

IN: Abbreviation for the state of Indiana. (United States)
Inferred Minimum Extent of Habitat Use (when actual extent is unknown): For certain animals, the distance (in kilometers) that the underlying mapped component(s) of an occurrence may be buffered in order to create a separate inferred extent feature that might better represent the area likely utilized by the species at that location, which may be useful for conservation planning purposes. The inferred extent distance is essentially an approximate spatial requirement for certain species, typically based on the average home range.

Informal Taxonomy: Informal taxonomic classification using common names for familiar groupings such as birds (Aves) or flowering plants (Anthophyta).

Imperiled Minimum Extent Justification — Notes related to the inferred extent distance specified for some animals.

Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS): A partnership of Federal agencies from the U.S. and Canada formed to improve the organization of and access to standardized nomenclature. The goal of ITIS is to create and maintain an easily accessible data system of species names and their hierarchical classification of flora and fauna from both aquatic and terrestrial habitats.

Intrinsic Vulnerability: Coded value indicating the degree to which intrinsic or inherent characteristics, such as life history or behavior patterns for species, or likelihood of regeneration or recolonization for ecosystems, make it susceptible or resilient to natural or anthropogenic stresses or catastrophes. For more information see NatureServe Conservation Status

Intrinsic Vulnerability Comments: Description of the reasons for value selected to indicate intrinsic vulnerability.

Inventory Needs: Description of inventory work that needs to be done in order to better determine the Conservation Status.

Invertebrates: For more information see Classification of Vertebrates and Invertebrates

Invertivore: Taxa that eat invertebrates.

Isolated Wetlands: Systems that are natural wetland types where >80% of all known occurrences are completely surrounded by uplands and there are no apparent surface water inlets and or outlets.

Because all common isolated wetland definitions really apply to individual wetland occurrences, an additional criterion must account for variation among occurrences of a given wetland type. Therefore, our rule was that if >80% of all occurrences of a given wetland type meet the above definition it will be considered an \'isolated wetland\' type. While one could likely identify \'isolated\' occurrences for nearly all types of wetlands, this additional criterion provides focus on a subset of wetland types where the \'isolated\' condition is characteristic.

NOTE: These definitions were developed solely to facilitate the generation of a classification of isolated wetland ecological system types from NatureServe\'s databases, to create linkages to rare species, and to allow documentation of scientific methodology. They are NOT intended to be a guide for defining individual on-the-ground occurrences of isolated wetlands for regulatory or other purposes. These definitions do not represent an endorsement by NatureServe (a non-advocacy organization) of any particular regulatory or other use by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Army Corps of Engineers, or other federal and state agencies.

ITIS Names: see Related ITIS Names

IUCN Red List Category: Code for the Endangerment status according to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Values include: EX = extinct, EW = extinct in wild, CR = critically endangered, EN = endangered, VU = vulnerable, LR = lower risk, DD = data deficient, NE = not evaluated, CD = conservation dependent, NT = near threatened, LC = least concern.

IUCN-CMP Classification of Threats: A threats classification scheme consisting of 11 broad (“level 1”) categories of threats. Each of these level 1 threats includes 3-6 more specific, finer (“level 2”) threats.

 

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